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  1. #121
    Would you mind elaborating a little bit on what "typically Elizabeth Bear" means? I've been looking at All the Windwracked Stars too, but I've never read any Bear and I'm not really sure what to expect from her in terms of style, theme and characterization. I think we've had similar tastes in a couple of other threads, so I'm curious what you thought of this one (taking into account that you didn't read the whole book).

  2. #122
    Off Amazon, about The Ghost in Love by Jonathan Carroll:
    From Publishers Weekly Death is not the end but rather the start of a series of madcap and sometimes moving adventures for characters in this spry novel about the un-afterlife. Events begin on a wintry day in Connecticut when Ben Gould slips and hits his head on a curb. He should have died, but owing to a virus in heaven's computer system, Ben's body lives on. Soon, Ben and others in his life—including his talking dog, Pilot, and his own ghost (named Ling)—find themselves endowed with extraordinary and unpredictable talents, including time traveling, the ability to hobnob with multiple incarnations of their younger selves, and a capacity to see otherwise invisible forces of fate manifested in bizarre physical forms. Carroll (Glass Soup) tethers the series of loopy incidents that ensues and their shaggy-dog explanation to incisive and poignant observations about the wondrous possibilities of everyday life that are the hallmark of his flippant style of fantasy. Carroll fans will best appreciate this jeu d'esprit. (Oct.)
    Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    Review

    "In The Ghost In Love Jonathan Carroll deepens his art, diving into his own obsessions with love and fate, without letting go of an ounce of the uncanny effervescent quality that has always caused readers to crave his narratives like an illegal substance. He's created a version of the world that shines like a beacon into our own." —Jonathan Lethem, author of You Don’t Love Me Yet

    "With The Ghost In Love, Jonathan Carroll is at the peak of his powers. An acknowledged master." —Bruce Wagner, author of Memorial
    Carroll is a favorite of mine, often shelved in the literature or mainstream fiction sections of bookstores rather than in the sf/f section.

    Randy M.
    Last edited by Randy M.; November 3rd, 2008 at 10:48 AM.

  3. #123
    Lord of the Wild Hunt Mithfânion's Avatar
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    CH:

    If you go here:

    http://www.amazon.com/All-Windwracke...5730625&sr=1-1

    Or here:

    http://www.elizabethbear.com/eddas.html

    You can read some chapters from the book, which is probably the best way of telling if you like it or not.

  4. #124
    You know, a lot of people (especially Rob ) are disliking Karen Miller's Empress but I actually liked it. You are supposed to feel uncomfortable by Hekat. You are supposed to root for her in the beginning, and then start to feel uncomfortable by her religious fanaticism, her contant reaffirmation to herself that her God is right. You are supposed to pull back from her as she does terrible things in her name of her God.

    Read the second book of the trilogy, the Riven Kingdom. I don`t want to spoil anything, but the second book of the trilogy was a good read (don`t worry, Hekat isn`t the central character this time), and you see why Karen Miller started off as she did.

    I am very much looking forward to the third book to see how Karen Miller wraps this trilogy up, because the worlds presented in the first two books are very different.

  5. #125
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aurian View Post
    You are supposed to root for her in the beginning, and then start to feel uncomfortable by her religious fanaticism, her contant reaffirmation to herself that her God is right. You are supposed to pull back from her as she does terrible things in her name of her God.
    I got that Miller turned the tables on what we were supposed to think and feel about Hekat I just thought the execution was lacking. I felt very browbeaten with the fact that Hekat was a religious fanatic and thought it came across as somewhat ham-handed.

    Conversely, take a character like Thomas Covenant. Throughout the Lord Foul's Bane he is an angry and bitter man who eventually becomes a rapist. Donaldson, while not forgiving his character, manages to make the read engrossing without the browbeating of the bad things about Covenant.

  6. #126
    Thanks for the link, Mith.

    I actually like the sample chapters a lot -- to me it feels like impressionism in prose. I don't know how that's going to hold up over a novel-length work, but in the small dose of the excerpt it works pretty well. I'll keep an eye out for this one when it hits the shelves in paperback.

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