Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 46 to 54 of 54
  1. #46
    Registered User offog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Spokane, Washington
    Posts
    39
    A lot of my favorite ideas have come from short stories of which I've read a lot more in the last couple of years.


    Apocalyptic

    Pesthouse - Jim Crace
    "The End of the World as We Know It - Dale Bailey
    "Speech Sound" - Octavia E. Butler
    "The People of Sand and Slag" - Paolo Bacigalupi

    Singularity/post-human

    Counting Heads - David Marusek
    "Wang's Carpets" - Greg Egan

    Bio-engineering

    "Blood Music" - Greg Bear

    Enhanced Intelligence

    "Flowers for Algernon" - Daniel Keyes
    "Understand" - Ted Chiang

  2. #47
    Registered Uber megaphage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by Ropie View Post
    Have you read Schild's Ladder?
    no, I'm intrigued by the descriptions I've read of it though. It sounds like I might enjoy it. I read this on Amazon...

    Building up from ideas of human intelligence in disembodied storage or artificial bodies, Egan finally takes his lead characters on a mind-boggling joyride through novo-vacuum, mapping them into a space where a tense eight-hour flight from deadly predators covers just one millimetre. There's a lot of room in there.
    Does this feature much in the story?

    On the list
    thanks

  3. #48
    Member of the Month™ Ropie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,721
    Quote Originally Posted by megaphage View Post
    Does this feature much in the story?
    As I remember it makes up most of the last third of the book. It was a strange novel - partly Egan tried hard with characterisation and background. I don't know if that's how he normally writes but it almost worked, though I found it a bit schmaltzy in places. The rest of it was pretty hard-concept stuff and genuinely complex (to me at any rate). Overall I'd say it was definitely worth reading.

  4. #49
    Live Long & Suffer psikeyhackr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Sol III
    Posts
    2,869
    Newtonian Physics!

    Authors that mention things involving that but then get it wrong are really annoying. It os only 300 years old.

    psik

  5. #50
    Live Long & Suffer psikeyhackr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Sol III
    Posts
    2,869
    Science Fiction will not be televised!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhQbjoDx0p8

    psik

  6. #51
    My favourite is about struggle to escape the gravity wells of a planet, against local government policy and society's popular ideas. Ben Bova's return to Mars is an example. Generally, I tend to enjoy stories about science advancement, about how people keep going despite of public scorn, limited budget, and many more challenges.

  7. #52
    _ amenhotepi noori noori's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    saudi arabia.
    Posts
    34
    Blog Entries
    21

    h g wells's Time Machine

    i think the concept of a time-machine, like h g wells's 'time machine' is one of my favorite SF Concepts. the cover-picture of the book i read years-ago there was like a contraption that has always reminded me of: a car ! SO as i love Saucers, a car fits my idea for my favorite SF Concept _



    ..


  8. #53
    Registered Uber megaphage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by Ropie View Post
    Have you read Schild's Ladder?
    As I remember it makes up most of the last third of the book. It was a strange novel - partly Egan tried hard with characterisation and background. I don't know if that's how he normally writes but it almost worked, though I found it a bit schmaltzy in places. The rest of it was pretty hard-concept stuff and genuinely complex (to me at any rate). Overall I'd say it was definitely worth reading.
    Thanks for the recommendation...

    I managed to get hold of it and I finished it yesterday. I enjoyed it... interesting concept and some intriguing fresh ideas. Squeezing decent characters into this was always going to be difficult, but I thought Egan had it about right to generate a bit of human interest and a setting that the reader can relate to.

    He'd obviously put a lot of thought into the physics and stuff but I did find some of that difficult to follow and I had to get on with it and accept I wouldn't be able to understand it exactly.

    I would have liked a more conclusive ending.

    Anachronauts are awesome!

  9. #54
    I like SF. SF is cool. Steven L Jordan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Germantown, Md.
    Posts
    456
    I'm most fascinated by the next stage of civilization: How we will develop beyond today's over-populated, environmentally-insensitive, resource-imbalanced, Manifest Destiny-obsessed culture.

    Concurrent with that, I love examples of living in these environments of tomorrow, including spaceships and orbital habitats, arcocities and post-collapse remnants. (My own novels reflect these interests as well.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •