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  1. #16
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    Trantor was one of the first, wasn't it?

    For me there's also William Gibson's Japanese Chiba City, which strangely always reminds me of Blade Runner's Los Angeles. (That one really has set the visual standard for so many, hasn't it?)

    I think my favourite though has to be Arthur C Clarke's Diaspar and Lys from Against the Fall of Night/The City and the Stars. They were two of the first I encountered, before Trantor, I think. Two cities together - one belowground and deserted, the other a modern dome city so beloved of SF.

    Guess that also means I should mention James Blish's New York from Cities in Flight too, with the iconic Analog cover:




    Mark.
    Last edited by Hobbit; July 23rd, 2009 at 11:57 AM. Reason: Typo!
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  2. #17
    Registered User Werthead's Avatar
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    Trantor and Coruscant are way too silly. You can't have a city covering a whole planet, the population would be in the hundreds of trillions or even quadrillions (in both cases the creators actually said it was around 1 trillion). You'd need hundreds of millions of giant spaceships flying in food and supplies daily. When Thrawn blockaded Coruscant in The Last Command the planet should have starved in days at best.

    That said, the Fall of Coruscant in Star by Star was pretty cool.

  3. #18
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    Trantor and Coruscant are way too silly.
    Ah, but who said in the thread that the place had to make sense? Some might say New York flying to the stars is silly (and others might just hope it would happen ) but I must admit, silly or not, I like the idea.

    Mind you, same goes for those huge mile-long spaceships and those ribbon walkways...

    Mark
    Mark

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Werthead View Post
    Trantor and Coruscant are way too silly. You can't have a city covering a whole planet, the population would be in the hundreds of trillions or even quadrillions (in both cases the creators actually said it was around 1 trillion). You'd need hundreds of millions of giant spaceships flying in food and supplies daily. When Thrawn blockaded Coruscant in The Last Command the planet should have starved in days at best.

    That said, the Fall of Coruscant in Star by Star was pretty cool.
    Actually Trantor is described as having a population of only around 40-45 billions IIRC. Which is still silly, but for a different reason - way too low population density for a city.

  5. #20
    Rogue Warrior
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Ekdahl View Post
    Yeah, it looks nice. A mixture between Dubai and London in fantasy setting.
    Yeah, It's similar to Venice, based loosely I guess you'd say on it. Canals, etc.

  6. #21
    Naaghabrother Martin Ekdahl's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbit View Post
    Guess that also means I should mention James Blish's New York from Cities in Flight too, with the iconic Analog cover:




    Mark.
    Oh, it reminds me of Atlantis in Stargate Atlantis a little bit.

  7. #22
    Naaghabrother Martin Ekdahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kazz Wylde View Post
    Yeah, It's similar to Venice, based loosely I guess you'd say on it. Canals, etc.
    A Venetian super city that is.

  8. #23
    Rogue Warrior
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Ekdahl View Post
    A Venetian super city that is.
    Right on

  9. #24
    trolling > dissertation nquixote's Avatar
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    There are tons of cool mega-cities in sci-fi literature, but I think they need a visual medium to truly do them justice. Mega-cities in Japanese cartoons are often excellent, because they have the real-life examples of Tokyo and Osaka to draw upon...

    Speaking of which, I'm headed to Tokyo in a few days to make a sort of mega-city documentary...

  10. #25
    Naaghabrother Martin Ekdahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nquixote View Post
    There are tons of cool mega-cities in sci-fi literature, but I think they need a visual medium to truly do them justice. Mega-cities in Japanese cartoons are often excellent, because they have the real-life examples of Tokyo and Osaka to draw upon...

    Speaking of which, I'm headed to Tokyo in a few days to make a sort of mega-city documentary...
    I envy you!

  11. #26
    Registered User JML's Avatar
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    Depending on how far is it possible to strecth the concept of a megacity, I nominate The City from Blame!. A structure the size of Jupiter's orbit maintaining life within. And lovely, murderous killermachines. Swarms of them.

    While keeping in the subject, Coruscant is too... happy. Love the discord, chaos and overall misery of Judge Dredd's megolopolises and the darkness of the cities of Blade Runner.

  12. #27
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Ekdahl View Post
    Please do!
    Consider it done:

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob's review
    Cities have long been characters in their own right in fiction, especially Science Fiction and Fantasy. One needs look no further than the seminal SF film Blade Runner to see the epitome of a sprawling future city. Cities in fiction often have their own quirks and personalities as much, and sometimes more, than the human characters who inhabit them. Modern writers like China Mieville and Jeff VanderMeer, and less recent writers like Fritz Leiber and M. John Harrison have made cities distinct and stand out settings of fantastic fiction. Here, editor John Scalzi gathers five well-regarded genre writers to peer into the telescope of the future and see what super-cities of the future might be like. Although this anthology began life as an audio book, Subterranean is publishing a limited and trade print edition of the anthology.

  13. #28
    Naaghabrother Martin Ekdahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JML View Post
    Depending on how far is it possible to strecth the concept of a megacity, I nominate The City from Blame!. A structure the size of Jupiter's orbit maintaining life within. And lovely, murderous killermachines. Swarms of them.

    While keeping in the subject, Coruscant is too... happy. Love the discord, chaos and overall misery of Judge Dredd's megolopolises and the darkness of the cities of Blade Runner.
    Mhh..sweet killermachines!

  14. #29
    Naaghabrother Martin Ekdahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B View Post
    Consider it done:
    Cities have long been characters in their own right in fiction, especially Science Fiction and Fantasy. One needs look no further than the seminal SF film Blade Runner to see the epitome of a sprawling future city. Cities in fiction often have their own quirks and personalities as much, and sometimes more, than the human characters who inhabit them.
    Yes, that is the feeling I get to. I think the city in Blade Runner plays a role as important as Harrison Ford's & Co. The city feels sprawled, aged and scented. It is such a wonderful metaphor of a human society gone wrong somewhere.

  15. #30
    One of my all-time favorite mega-cities is Chung Kuo by David Wingrove. If you haven't read the series, the characters are probably the strongest part, but the world=building is very good as well. Wingrove has a 100+ level city spanning countries that supports a strict caste system, with higher castes living on higher floors.

    The slums beneath the city are the absolute dregs of humanity, while the only people to make it to the top and see the sky are emperors.

    He really spins a great story although it does fall apart in the last book or two.

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