Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 56
  1. #31
    Jack Bauer Bastard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bastard Books
    Posts
    1,831
    I'm a novice, apprentice, and journeyman mix.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqZro8oNovU

  2. #32
    "You read for pleasure and only what suits your interest. "



    Is there anyone out there who reads for something besides pleasure? Or who reads books that don't interest them?
    Last edited by quajack; July 28th, 2010 at 07:38 PM. Reason: added quotes

  3. #33
    Somewhere between Journeyman and Scholar.

    I feel really out of touch with the past decade, though. There's so much of it, and I've only read the smallest percentage. There was a time when I had either read, or chosen not to read, every fantasy/sf novel I could get my hands on.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by imryel View Post
    Hi guys. Say I am around or close to a Journeyman... What sources would you recommend for me to start my way to gathering the knowledge to become a Scholar and beyond? If someone could suggest either good web sites or books, that would be appreciated.

    For example, in the description for Scholar, it states "You find yourself buying books on genre history and criticism." What would some of these be?

    Thanks
    Probably the best place to start is with Farrah Mendelsohn and Edward James' A Short History of Fantasy. John Clute and John Grant's Encyclopedia of Fantasy is THE classic, although it is more of a reference than a continuous narrative, plus it is about fifteen years old. The SF version is also excellent with an online version due at some point.

    Wikipedia is also your friend. Beyond the two above you start getting more arcane, but some good ones are Michael Moorcock's Wizardry and Wild Romance, Farrah Mendelsohn's Rhetorics of Fantasy, and for fun, Diana Wynn Jones' Tough Guide to Fantasyland. Unless you want to get into heavy fantasy lit theory, I'd avoid Rhetorics. There are some others, but that should get you started.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by quajack View Post
    "You read for pleasure and only what suits your interest. "

    Is there anyone out there who reads for something besides pleasure? Or who reads books that don't interest them?
    Sure, writers and scholars do this all the time. A scholar of a given field will read stuff for educational purposes. Personally speaking I don't finish books that I'm not really enjoying, but I will pick up books that are outside of my areas of interest just to get a taste of what they're about. This also has to do with being a writer and wanting to expose myself to different things.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by quajack View Post
    "You read for pleasure and only what suits your interest. "



    Is there anyone out there who reads for something besides pleasure? Or who reads books that don't interest them?
    students...

  7. #37
    Is there anyone out there who reads for something besides pleasure? Or who reads books that don't interest them?
    Academics keeping up with the lit in their field or starting out on a research topic. Though you do read those rather differently than normal stuff. Historians will slip over most of the events narrative on something that's very familiar to them to see what's new about this interpretation. They may well also start out by going over the footnotes, especially if it's related to their own current research topic.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemist View Post
    Probably the best place to start is with Farrah Mendelsohn and Edward James' A Short History of Fantasy. John Clute and John Grant's Encyclopedia of Fantasy is THE classic, although it is more of a reference than a continuous narrative, plus it is about fifteen years old. The SF version is also excellent with an online version due at some point.

    Wikipedia is also your friend. Beyond the two above you start getting more arcane, but some good ones are Michael Moorcock's Wizardry and Wild Romance, Farrah Mendelsohn's Rhetorics of Fantasy, and for fun, Diana Wynn Jones' Tough Guide to Fantasyland. Unless you want to get into heavy fantasy lit theory, I'd avoid Rhetorics. There are some others, but that should get you started.
    Thank you for that. I will keep my eyes open for cheaper copies of the first two, although I am a little bit intimidated by the idea of an encyclopedia that is 15 years out of date, especially with how much fantasy has changed in those years. Also will look out for the other ones.

  9. #39
    Journeyman 4 LIFE!

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by imryel View Post
    Thank you for that. I will keep my eyes open for cheaper copies of the first two, although I am a little bit intimidated by the idea of an encyclopedia that is 15 years out of date, especially with how much fantasy has changed in those years. Also will look out for the other ones.
    On a publishing level probably a lot has changed -- epic fantasy no longer the main source of fantasy on bookshelfs, bookshelves no longer the sole source of books of fantasy, the proliferation of smaller presses, the resurgence of contemporary fantasy, the onslaught of romance into urban fantasy, and so on. But the intent of fantasy to evoke wonder if not awe, to obliquely comment on the world we live in, to entertain through feats of imagination and invention, all should still be in place,

    Perhaps more relevant, Clute's encyclopedia covers the root sources of most any fantasy you read. Like Vandermeer and Mieville? Well, maybe you'd find something of interest in reading about Lovecraft, C.A. Smith, C. L. Moore, Mervyn Peake, M. John Harrison, Michael Moorcock, etc. An epic fantasy fantatic? Well, maybe you'd like to know more about the sagas that inspired Tolkien, or about E. R. Eddison or William Morris. Think Catherine Valente's orphan's tales are the bee's knees and the cat's pajamas? Maybe entries on Orientalist fantasy and the influence of the 1001 Nights will further spark your interest, maybe even lead you to work by William Beckford and Lafcadio Hearn.

    And so on and so on. Great book to dip into randomly and read a few entries.

    Two other fine books, if you can dig up copies,
    The Language of the Night by Ursula K. Le Guin (collection of essays)
    Fantasists on Fantasy ed. by Kenneth Boyer and Kenneth Zahorski (anthology of essays; includes essays by C. S. Lewis, Tolkien, Moorcock and others)


    Randy M.

  11. #41
    Ataraxic Moderator KatG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    In the Sea of Tranquility
    Posts
    12,014
    Let's put it this way: I know more than you.

    But knowledge does not always mean wisdom.

  12. #42
    The Magnificent Roy Ryders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The Orient
    Posts
    49
    Master, I think. I've been reading for a long time, and I've read and written lots of stuff. Or, if not Master, then Getting There, know what I mean?

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by KatG View Post
    Let's put it this way: I know more than you.

    But knowledge does not always mean wisdom.
    LOL. True. Actually, when I was writing this I had you in mind as someone whose responses I always enjoy for their erudition. I see you as at least a Master if not a Sage.

    Randy, The Language of the Night is one of my all-time favorite books although it is more about writing and thinking about fantasy than a reference work. But it is a beautiful book. She also has a new collection of essays called Cheek by Jowl which focuses more on children's fantasy, although I haven't dived into it yet.

    For a decent coffee table book, Pringle's Fantasy encyclopedia is ok, but it is certainly not a definitive work. You could also just scan through Amazon's Fantasy History & Criticism category, although it lists 945 books, most of which are specific to a movie or Tolkien or Rowling, etc.

    It is also worth mentioning that there should be a fantasy version of the Cambridge Companion series out at some point. I read someone mention it but I haven't seen anything official and there isn't a listing on Amazon. But that should be a good one if and when it comes out.

  14. #44
    Specfic Writer David Wilbanks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    MN, USA
    Posts
    31
    Scholar I guess.

  15. #45
    P. Aaron Potter
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Posts
    13
    I suppose, having actually taught upper-division level courses on the subject, having fantasy as the root of my dissertation, and having written at least one novel in the field, I must qualify as a 'Sage.' I do wonder about the criteria for the test being breadth, rather than depth of knowledge. But then again, maybe anyone willing to actually question the test itself gets bonus points for their supercilliousness.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •