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  1. #1
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    SF Masterworks review summary

    Thought I'd pass on a great link, and not because I'm in it. (Mark Chitty's in there too.)

    Pete Young's Big Sky, a fanzine, has summarised the Gollancz SF Masterworks series by collating over 400 pages of reviews on the books. It's a colossal project, and Pete deserves a great big 'Thank You' for doing so. They make great reading (my reviews excepted), and are available for download as PDF's, for free, here:

    http://efanzines.com/bigsky/index.htm


    Issues 3 & 4 are what you need. Thank you, Pete. Hope you all find it interesting reading, and useful, like I did.
    Mark

  2. #2
    Vanaeph Westsiyeed's Avatar
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    Very useful, thanks.

    I know at least a few others as well as myself are getting through a number of novels in the series, this will undoubtedly give us a few more!

  3. #3
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    This is great, thanks very much

    Edit: spelling

  4. #4
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    I know at least a few others as well as myself are getting through a number of novels in the series, this will undoubtedly give us a few more!
    You know, Westsiyeed, that was exactly my reaction: I went off and read some more 'old stuff' from the series.

    I find that when I need a break from the new stuff it's fun to go back and read, or in some cases reread, some of the older classics.
    I really must review them more.

    Very pleased others have been spurred on by this as well.

    M.
    Mark

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbit View Post
    You know, Westsiyeed, that was exactly my reaction: I went off and read some more 'old stuff' from the series.

    I find that when I need a break from the new stuff it's fun to go back and read, or in some cases reread, some of the older classics.
    I really must review them more.

    Very pleased others have been spurred on by this as well.

    M.
    A "break from the new stuff" is something I need far too often, I have the feeling that science fiction has plunged quality-wise in the past decade, with very few books that I actually find enjoyable.

    As to the masterworks series, it is pretty good.

    I actually recommended it a few days ago on this very forum.

  6. #6
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    And there we go: I've now reread Heinlein's Double Star.

    I know what you mean, Vlad: when you've been reading this stuff a while it can seem like you say. The old stuff is often forgotten in favour of the new: and even though there's a lot of old stuff that's not good (and Double Star, first Hugo Award Winner for Heinlein, isn't perfect), if you can read with some degree of the context, there is some stuff that's great.

    Said it before: really must read more 'old stuff' for SFFWorld.

    M.
    Mark

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbit View Post
    And there we go: I've now reread Heinlein's Double Star.

    I know what you mean, Vlad: when you've been reading this stuff a while it can seem like you say. The old stuff is often forgotten in favour of the new: and even though there's a lot of old stuff that's not good (and Double Star, first Hugo Award Winner for Heinlein, isn't perfect), if you can read with some degree of the context, there is some stuff that's great.

    Said it before: really must read more 'old stuff' for SFFWorld.

    M.
    And there are so many others, Murray Leinster, Cordwainer Smith, Clifford D. Simak, Henry Kuttner, A. E. van Vogt, Clarke, Asimov, all those New Wave writers, all the decent cyberpunk, Vernor Vinge, Niven, Greg Bear, and many more.

    A few of those authors are still active, but to tell you the truth I just do not enjoy their latest stuff the way I enjoyed the earlier books.

  8. #8
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    I do understand that point - even though personally I'm not a big fan of Cordwainer Smith nor many of the New Wave, I've read and enjoyed all the other authors you've named there.

    Is there a case to say that there's enough old stuff to read, if you're not impressed with the new stuff?

    M.
    Last edited by Hobbit; August 31st, 2014 at 03:04 PM.
    Mark

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbit View Post
    I do understand that point - even though personally I'm not a big fan of Cordwainer Smith nor many of the New Wave, I've read and enjoyed all the other authors you've named there.

    Is there a case to say that there's enough old stuff to read, if you're not impressed with the new stuff?

    M.
    I definitely think there is.

    Also yey, I found another Simak fan
    Well, besides the people I forced him onto that is

    There is one big problem however, a lot of the older stuff is not in stock, print or available as e-books.
    Last edited by Vlad1; August 31st, 2014 at 05:31 PM.

  10. #10
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    Also yey, I found another Simak fan
    Yup. Think Cliff is underrated these days. Here's my review of City for SFFWorld: LINK.

    There is one big problem however, a lot of the older stuff is not in stock, print or available as e-books.
    Yup: I am lucky in that I have a pretty complete run of The Magazine of Fantasy & SF from its beginning to 1998 and Astounding/Analog from about 1950 - 2000.

    There are specialist publishers out there who deal with old authors: Wildside Press, Phoenix Pick, for example.

    But part of the fun is discovering ones few people know about.

    M.
    Mark

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