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  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by rhallva View Post
    In thinking about this I realized that, other than some things like King's The Cell and The Omega Man, I have not read many zombie-ish books. I think this is because so often zombies seem to be unthinking things that maybe (for me) lend themselves to movies more so than novels. I am going to take a look at some of the suggested readings here though!
    Thanks all!
    I think you've pretty well summed up my reaction to zombies, too. I haven't gone out of my way to read about them because I find them the least interesting of monsters.

    Randy M.

  2. #17
    Dragon loves dog tmilktoast's Avatar
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    I'm one of those, seemingly numerous, people that likes zombie films, stories, books, etc. Yet, I'm not a big fan of horror films at all, though I do enjoy horror literature at times. I detest gore-fest movies and things like Saw. Still, I love all (most) of the zombie stuff out there.

    I've concluded that I like zombie stories because they are just another take on the post-apocalypse genre. Rather than a diminished population trying to survive after a nuclear war or virus, here they're trying to survive a horde of zombies and other, living, people who also must do anything they can to survive. To me, I think it is less about the horror of the zombie, and more about the horror of the world as we know it utterly and irrevocably changed.

    The excitement and interest is created by the characters reaction to that changed world. The zombies themselves are more of prop, a plot device, whereas in vampire fiction, for instance, there will likely be vampires as main characters.

    At least that is how I reconcile my love for zombiedom when I otherwise dislike horror films.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by tmilktoast View Post
    I'm one of those, seemingly numerous, people that likes zombie films, stories, books, etc. Yet, I'm not a big fan of horror films at all, though I do enjoy horror literature at times. I detest gore-fest movies and things like Saw. Still, I love all (most) of the zombie stuff out there.

    I've concluded that I like zombie stories because they are just another take on the post-apocalypse genre. Rather than a diminished population trying to survive after a nuclear war or virus, here they're trying to survive a horde of zombies and other, living, people who also must do anything they can to survive. To me, I think it is less about the horror of the zombie, and more about the horror of the world as we know it utterly and irrevocably changed.

    The excitement and interest is created by the characters reaction to that changed world. The zombies themselves are more of prop, a plot device, whereas in vampire fiction, for instance, there will likely be vampires as main characters.

    At least that is how I reconcile my love for zombiedom when I otherwise dislike horror films.
    There is a pretty big Post--Apocalpse genre out there. Have you tried any of the non-zombie/vampire stuff?

  4. #19
    Dragon loves dog tmilktoast's Avatar
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    Yeah. I didn't really state my point clearly, and that was simply that I love the post-apocalypse genre, and most zombie stories fit within that genre which is a large reason why I like them.

  5. #20

    best?

    My favorite zombie books are The Rising by Brian Keene and What Zombies Fear by Kirk Allmond.

  6. #21
    i don't read many zombie books but one of my favorite books of all time is feed by Mira Grant

  7. #22
    You might check out Carrie Ryan's The Forest of Hands and Teeth. It's the first book of a trilogy. The other two are The Dead-Tossed Waves and The Dark and Hollow Places, which was just released recently.

    I typically don't like zombie reads, but these are ok. They were recommended to me by a friend who likes that stuff a lot more than I do. I haven't read the third book but the first one was pretty good. The second one is ok. I honestly couldn't tell you if the books themselves are myeh or if it's just my own personal preferences. You'd have to try them and see if you like them. Good luck!

  8. #23
    Yep, gotta agree with Brian Keene's The Rising and City of the Dead but don't forget about his novel Dead Sea either. Stephen King's Cell is great. H.P. Lovecraft's short story Herbert West: Re-animator. You should also check out Joe McKinney's Dead City, Apocalypse of the Dead, and Flesh Eaters. Jonathan Maberry's Dead of Night and Patient Zero. John Skipp edited a great set of zombie story anthologies called Book of the Dead, Still Dead: Book of the Dead 2, and Zombies: Encounters with the Hungry Dead.

  9. #24
    I liked World War Z, but not as good as Keene's Rising or Ellington's Zombie University, which as a short, but fun, read.

  10. #25
    http://tinyurl.com/363ogv DurzoBlint's Avatar
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    Jonathan Maberry has a YA series Rot and Ruin as well as some older zombie novels. It is his bread and butter. For Star Wars fans Death Troopers is also an option. It was decent as I recall.

  11. #26
    Webmaster, Great SF&F owlcroft's Avatar
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    One more notably literate one:

    Colson Whitehead's Zone One. (Whitehead is also the author of the too-little-known specfic tale The Intuitionist).

  12. #27
    Zone One is filled with great prose and almost a complete absence of plot. If you expect anything to happen, you are going to be disappointed. However, if you want a thoughful consideration of what people think during the zombie apocalypse, I found it pretty interesting, and the intentially confusing, almost surreal ending was really fun to read.

  13. #28
    Yeah... I JUST finished reading Zone One. It was the first "zombie" book I have ever read and I found it to be a fascinating take on the whole scheme. Phil is right there isnt really a plot per say but its consistent with the main character's pov.

    I liked the philosophical bent of it.. at the beginning I was frustrated because when I think zombie survival I'm used to characters trying to figure out things on a macro-level and so on but as the book progressed I just enjoyed thoughts of Mark Spitz.

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