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  1. #1

    what is the most epic sci fi bokk there is?

    I know there is a thread listing all the epic space operas but it doesn't really say which is the best or the most epic. I want to read a book, space opera preferably, I'm not good with sci fi jargon though I'm not against it, which is epic with lots of action and a good book. Something like the original dune or the sci fi comparable to a game of thrones or lord of the rings.

  2. #2
    If there is something that most sci-fi lovers can agree on, like folks agree on Martin's first 3 books, I'm forgetting what it is. Here are a couple of personal recommendations to check out for epic sci-fi.

    Night's Dawn Trilogy by Peter Hamilton: Wierd premise, excessive violence and a lousy ending. The writing and plotting though, I found just as good as Martin. I absolutely loved it (except the ending), but I certainly couldnt call it "best" in the sense that I think its everyone's cup of tea.

    Pandora's Star/Judas Unchained by Peter Hamilton: Also very epic, with a much better ending. Much more traditional space opera than The Night's Dawn trilogy, although nothing Hamilton writes is paint-by-the-numbers.

    Brin's series beginning with Sundiver: This is a very imaginative, well regarded series that I liked a lot. First book written in 1980, not sure its still easy to find.

    Niven and Pournelle, The Mote in God's Eye: More "traditional" epic space opera, enjoyed it very much. Should not be a controversial recommendation, even if its not a personal favorite of everyone.
    Last edited by ArtNJ; December 8th, 2010 at 02:37 PM.

  3. #3
    Registered User Jeroen's Avatar
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    Try Dan Simmons - Hyperion
    (and part 2: Dan Simmons - The Fall of Hyperion)

    Big and epic. Lots of ins and outs. Intriguing, exciting.

  4. #4
    trolling > dissertation nquixote's Avatar
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    Agree with Jeroen. It doesn't get any more cosmic than The Fall of Hyperion. (Just remember to avoid the Endymion sequels.)

    Also, E.E. Doc Smith's classic 40s-vintage Lensman series is pretty epic.

  5. #5
    I made a gigantic list. Nights Dawn or Hyperion would get my vote also.

  6. #6
    trolling > dissertation nquixote's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andols View Post
    I made a gigantic list. Nights Dawn or Hyperion would get my vote also.
    A) You shameless self-promoter.

    B) Haven't read Night's Dawn actually (!), but Hyperion encompasses the end/beginning of time and the fate of the entire Universe...hard to imagine something more epic than that!

    C) A Fire Upon the Deep is also pretty epic. Although it deals with only one galaxy, it is very good at creating a sense of hugeness.

  7. #7
    Registered User JunkMonkey's Avatar
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    When did 'epic' become an adjective?

  8. #8
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Not sure what "bokks" are but Epic can be fairly subjective. A lot of people will point to Peter F. Hamilton and Alastair Reynolds as writers write Epic SF. Even more subjective than "epic" is best...

    Here's that great thread Andols created: Epic SF and Space Opera: Here's my giant list, what's missing?

  9. #9
    Live Long & Suffer psikeyhackr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JunkMonkey View Post
    When did 'epic' become an adjective?
    What does epic mean anyway in relation to sci-fi?

    I'll go along with:

    The Mote in God's Eye - Larry Niven

    The Uplift War - David Brin

    Red Mars, Green Mars, Blue Mars - Kim Stanley Robinson
    The Mars series is the best for realism. The other two require FTL and intelligent aliens.

    psik

  10. #10
    I'll go with this definition:
    Surpassing the usual or ordinary, particularly in scope or size
    And suggest The Helliconia trilogy (Helliconia - Spring, if I'm only allowed to pick one book) by Brian Aldiss. If anything, these books have scope.

  11. #11
    Fulgurous Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    Hyperion most definitely.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by nquixote View Post
    A) You shameless self-promoter.

    B) Haven't read Night's Dawn actually (!), but Hyperion encompasses the end/beginning of time and the fate of the entire Universe...hard to imagine something more epic than that!

    C) A Fire Upon the Deep is also pretty epic. Although it deals with only one galaxy, it is very good at creating a sense of hugeness.
    I bought vinge's books and havent touched them yet. no idea why.

  13. #13
    Use The Force IkariX's Avatar
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    I'd Say as follow IMO.

    1. Night's Dawn Trilogy(incl. A second chance at Eden) By Peter F. hamilton
    2. Fallen Dragon(IMO....couldn't put it down)
    3. Hyperion, Fall of Hyperion
    4. Saga of the 7 Suns(Yes, i loved it. All 7 of them) Kevin J. Anderson
    5. Star Wars : The Dark Nest Trilogy(yes, it's Star Wars. But, I really enjoyed it)

    Thanks

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Andols View Post
    I bought vinge's books and havent touched them yet. no idea why.
    do it.


  15. #15
    I like SF. SF is cool. Steven L Jordan's Avatar
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    I'm old-school... the Foundation series.

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