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  1. #16
    the Thirsty thirstyVan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdI View Post
    Hell yeah. I haven't looked at the blog today thanks for the update. Right on I am stoked as well.

    I do not do book signings never have. Never cared about that kind of crap but I am almost tempted to go to one of the signings. Rothfuss is the literary equivalent of the band Tool for me.
    Oh, do you like Tool? Weird :P

  2. #17
    I've never been to a book signing before. How do these things typically work? Does B&N let you bring your own book or are you supposed to grab one before the signing begins or what?

  3. #18
    Now if only Rothfuss could spit em out like Sanderson.... Don't get me wrong TNOTW was a great book... but Ill most likely wait till the third comes out to pick up WMF due to the looongg wait between books... granted its not Martin wait time but still...

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by AzWingsFan View Post
    Now if only Rothfuss could spit em out like Sanderson.... Don't get me wrong TNOTW was a great book... but Ill most likely wait till the third comes out to pick up WMF due to the looongg wait between books... granted its not Martin wait time but still...
    The difference between Rothfuss and Martin is Rothfuss has already written the entire story. The time between books is an endless process of revision. And while Sanderson is a talented writer I certainly wouldn't put him anywhere near the level of Rothfuss. Rotfuss's prose is significantly more advanced.
    Last edited by 3rdI; January 14th, 2011 at 08:30 AM.

  5. #20
    Then you must not have read much Sanderson... Yes Rothfuss writes very well.... But... Sandersons prose is very good as well... Going back to TNOTW I cant say that his prose is better than Sandersons... not to mention Sandersons books are much more original and interesting....

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by AzWingsFan View Post
    Then you must not have read much Sanderson... Yes Rothfuss writes very well.... But... Sandersons prose is very good as well... Going back to TNOTW I cant say that his prose is better than Sandersons... not to mention Sandersons books are much more original and interesting....
    We might as well agree to disagree. I am sure we could both produce plenty of examples to lend weight to our positions but it would be pointless. They are both good writers might as well leave it at that.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdI View Post
    We might as well agree to disagree. I am sure we could both produce plenty of examples to lend weight to our positions but it would be pointless. They are both good writers might as well leave it at that.
    I know I will regret posting this, but, Sanderson isn't even in the same league as Rothfuss or Martin. He is a very good and quick writer, I just can't say Ive been blown away by any of his books I've read. Just my opinion, not meaning to knock anyone's favorite authors.

  8. #23
    You can read my spoiler-free review of The Wise Man's Fear here.

    Keep in mind that I do elaborate on various facets of the novel. So if you want to go into this one totally fresh, you might want to skip it...

    Cheers,

    Patrick

  9. #24
    Registered User MattNY's Avatar
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    Ha, great write up Pat. That is the first review I have read of yours (I very rarely read reviews for my entertainment options), but it is obvious you put a lot of time and thought into it (and if you didn't, I guess you're just that damn good).

  10. #25
    Thanks, Matt, but I'll have to take that compliment with a grain of salt. Indeed, according to some, I'm about the worst thing the internet has to offer!

    But I know Pat, I know his editor, and we share an agent. So it was important to be sort of thorough, without giving anything away. Especially since this was the first full review of TWMF.

    Cheers,

    Patrick

  11. #26
    Registered User MattNY's Avatar
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    Well, I bookmarked your site and plan on checking it out more in depth.

    As for WMF, despite Pat's review speaking directly to me when he said 'if you weren't thrilled by Rothfuss' debut, then I believe you need not bother with the second volume', I am strongly considering picking this book up. I did enjoy Rothfuss' writing, even if I was less than thrilled with the story itself.

    Plus, WMF is a huge release for the fantasy genre, and it is a series I am actually up to speed on (very hard, I know, with only one book released thus far). And I don't mind giving money to Rothfuss and those that are publishing his work, so even if I don't enjoy it as much as others, at least I am not supporting some ass.
    Last edited by MattNY; January 15th, 2011 at 10:22 PM.

  12. #27
    I'm doing a second reading of The Name of the Wind to get ready for Wise Man's Fear and I think I am enjoying the book more this time than in my initial reading. This is really going to be fun to see where Patrick takes us next.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by pat5150 View Post
    You can read my spoiler-free review of The Wise Man's Fear here.

    Keep in mind that I do elaborate on various facets of the novel. So if you want to go into this one totally fresh, you might want to skip it...

    Cheers,

    Patrick
    Excellent review Pat. Extremely well done.

    I don't agree with the issues you presented as being problematic as most of those issues you discussed were basically the same ones present in your opinion in NOTW and I did not see any of those issues as being problematic. All I can say is that if you are saying fans who liked the first book will love the second, and with the first book receiving critical acclaim, I find it hard to see how you can then mainly pick at the faults in the book and give it only an 8. Granted an 8 out of 10 is far from a bad score just found it a bit surprising it wasn't a bit higher. I suppose there are two main camps with Rothfuss. Those that think he is as good as anyone in the genre ala Elizabeth Wollheim (whose assessment I completely agree with) and those that think he is merely another good fantasy author. So much comes down to preference as you gave Erikson's Memories of Ice a 10/10 where I found it to be merely another foray into the study of cultural anthropology mixed in with comic book like characters and thin plot lines.

    Personal opinion aside the review was superbly written just as your Bakker review was.

    Peace
    Last edited by 3rdI; January 16th, 2011 at 04:22 PM.

  14. #29
    Lord of the Wild Hunt Mithfânion's Avatar
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    So much comes down to preference as you gave Erikson's Memories of Ice a 10/10 where I found it to be merely another foray into the study of cultural anthropology mixed in with comic book like characters and thin plot lines.
    Nicely put, and seconded.

    Having said that, I do think that if you're looking at another 400 pages of Kvothe at University at the start of the book, I see that as a disappointment. I suspect Rothfuss is really padding this out beyond the point of it still being engaging.

    I mentioned elsewhere that Rothfuss was inspired by or loved the Earthsea trilogy by Le Guin, which tells a similar story. That trilogy is a mere 470 pages in paperback, whereas this one is 1,600 pages in hardcover, two books into a trilogy. That says a lot about how epic fantasy publishing has changed, but it also says a lot about Rothfuss being the absolute opposite of brevity.

    Many of us will soak the book up of course, but I suspect there is going to be a good deal of tedium at the start there, if we are talking about 400 pages of introduction and re-acquainting.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Mithfânion View Post
    Nicely put, and seconded.

    Having said that, I do think that if you're looking at another 400 pages of Kvothe at University at the start of the book, I see that as a disappointment. I suspect Rothfuss is really padding this out beyond the point of it still being engaging.

    I mentioned elsewhere that Rothfuss was inspired by or loved the Earthsea trilogy by Le Guin, which tells a similar story. That trilogy is a mere 470 pages in paperback, whereas this one is 1,600 pages in hardcover, two books into a trilogy. That says a lot about how epic fantasy publishing has changed, but it also says a lot about Rothfuss being the absolute opposite of brevity.

    Many of us will soak the book up of course, but I suspect there is going to be a good deal of tedium at the start there, if we are talking about 400 pages of introduction and re-acquainting.
    Thanks Mith

    I think it will depend on what is in those first 400 pages. The university years seem to be extremely vital to the development of Kvothe and you figure the point where Rothfuss ended the NOTW you would expect the beginning of the book would pick right back up there. Plus with the book being so large there is plenty of time for the plot to develop.

    I guess it really depends on the expectation one has for this book. With Rothfuss I enjoy the detail and prose so much that I do not mind slow plot development. Reminds me quite a bit of Williams MS&T. I didn't mind the pacing because the characters, the story, and the world are all so compelling and fascinating that it wouldn't have mattered how many pages Williams spent meandering around Osten Ard. I think when characters are so intricately done it becomes easy to draw the reader in and sort of removes the need to push or force the plot quickly.

    I am so excited about this book and Pat's review brought a smile to my face because it seems that everything I loved about The Name of the Wind is still very much the core of what The Wise Man's Fear is about.

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