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  1. #331
    I just finished the book. I have already stated in detail why I think The Kingkiller Chronicle is the best story I have ever read. I won't go into further detail as to why. My opinion has already been expressed on numerous occasions.

    The complaint I see most often is plot. I wonder if this comes from the fact that some readers are expecting traditional epic fantasy and are getting something very different. Epic implies grand, large, extravagant. Massive battles set in fantastic worlds with clearly definable protagonists and antagonists. Larger than life heroes on epic quests to save the world. Traditional plot development and third person narrative mode.

    This book is not a traditional work of epic fantasy. It IS an autobiography and and should be read as such. In this sense there is no grand enemy or truly epic, world shaking events. Patrick Rothfuss explained this perfectly when he said at it's core, this is a story about how stories are created. It is the story of a man's life. An extraordinary story set in a rich and detailed world. It has the traditional fantasy tropes and trappings and they are both celebrated and made fun of. It is full of satire without actually being a work of satire.

    I can see how this really was one long story. And while it has been revised to fit into a standard trilogy it certainly doesn't read like one. The story transcends genre and as such seems to resonate with a more diverse audience than just the traditional hard core fantasy reader . At the same time I can see where for some who read traditional epic fantasy this story might be lacking in those elements that draw many people to the genre.

    The Wise Man's Fear is a fascinating read. I look forward to many future re-reads. I hope Rothfuss takes his time with the final installment, The Doors of Stone. I hope he continues writing the story that he wants to read because it is the story I want to read as well.
    Last edited by 3rdI; March 13th, 2011 at 10:43 PM.

  2. #332
    Frog Lady Kaeru's Avatar
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    I emphatically agree. ..... With 3rdI. Pub, we're on such different ends of the spectrum I wonder if we read the same book. I have a bit of a potty mouth in real life as well, and I am also bothered by excessive swearing in books. To me, it's because it feels like a cheap alternative to well-written dialogue. It bothers me most from authors I know are better than that. Though, I struggle with writing dialogue more than anything else so I probably don't have much right to be cranky.
    Last edited by Kaeru; March 13th, 2011 at 10:55 PM.

  3. #333
    Like i said i get the concept he achieves in his writing i get that it's like an autobiography. But it's just not interesting or entertaining enough through the whole book to say thats its a great book.

    Like take for exmple the mercenary part there like 50 pages of boring tedium followed by 10 or less of fast pace action. then its another 50 pages of boring tedious stuff. followed by 10 pages of moaning about denna.

    It's irritating the glosses over parts or leaves out bit that would keep the pace moving forward. Then draws it back to a crawl by drawing things out longer than they need to be.

    If i were to read biographies (i have a couple not many though) They have to be about interesting people the story of their life has to be interesting. Kovthe story could be so much better.
    Nobody wants to read an autobiography about Bill clinton moaning and pissing on about monica lewinski for 400 pages. Sure put some in there as it was a major part of his life but he did much more interesting things than that.

  4. #334
    http://tinyurl.com/363ogv DurzoBlint's Avatar
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    Finished the book late last night and I still like the characters and where it appears to be going, but WMF was full of a lot of filler. A lot of ground was rehashed from the first book. The side quests were entertaining but the end result didn't shed much light on the overall picture.

    I felt that some more editing could have pared this down a few hundred pages more. I plan to read the next book in the series as it should be fast paced and full of action. It's hard not to like everyone in the book and Rothfuss' style but I was disappointed with all the fluff. I'm in it for the long haul but this was not better than the first book in the series.

  5. #335
    Brandon Sanderson's review of The Wise Man's Fear.

    http://mistborn.livejournal.com/168001.html

    Another glowing review. The Wise Man's Fear is receiving an extensive amount of critical acclaim. I could list another twenty reviews from respected authors and professional book reviewers that echo a similar sentiment. As mentioned previously the book is Number One on the NY Times best sellers list that will be released on March 20th and is already into its fourth printing since its release two weeks ago. Congratulations to Pat.

  6. #336
    A Fantasy Freak
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pub View Post


    Spoiler:
    What little plot there is seems rather obvious Denna is the lackless sister The lockless box is where Jax caught the name of the moon and there will never be peace in the word till someone frees that name.
    If Rothfuss does end Kovthe story with this triliogy i can see Bast being the next in line to continue on where Kovthe decided to give up. Ironic that he gives up considering how much he craps on about never giving up
    Spoiler:
    You may or may not be correct, however there are a few arguments against Denna being the Lackless sister. When Kvothe meets Meluan, he cannot place why she looks familar. He then runs into Denna shortly afterwards. Surely if Meluan resembled Denna, he would have been able to put that together after seeing Denna. He does not. Him not being able to place why Meluan seems familiar speaks to it being a more distant memory, which would fit in with his mom being the sister.

    Additionally in tNotW, Kvothe recites a poem about the Lackless family that earns him a scolding from his mom. She states that it is due to the Lackless family being real people, which is plausible of course.

    So while there is nothing conclusive, there are a lot of small clues leading up to the mom being the Lackless sister, and really nothing much to support it being Denna. Which means its probably Denna. :-) I suck at theorizing!

  7. #337
    Registered User artemis-rose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdI View Post
    I just finished the book. I have already stated in detail why I think The Kingkiller Chronicle is the best story I have ever read. I won't go into further detail as to why. My opinion has already been expressed on numerous occasions.

    The complaint I see most often is plot. I wonder if this comes from the fact that some readers are expecting traditional epic fantasy and are getting something very different. Epic implies grand, large, extravagant. Massive battles set in fantastic worlds with clearly definable protagonists and antagonists. Larger than life heroes on epic quests to save the world. Traditional plot development and third person narrative mode.

    This book is not a traditional work of epic fantasy. It IS an autobiography and and should be read as such. In this sense there is no grand enemy or truly epic, world shaking events. Patrick Rothfuss explained this perfectly when he said at it's core, this is a story about how stories are created. It is the story of a man's life. An extraordinary story set in a rich and detailed world. It has the traditional fantasy tropes and trappings and they are both celebrated and made fun of. It is full of satire without actually being a work of satire.

    I can see how this really was one long story. And while it has been revised to fit into a standard trilogy it certainly doesn't read like one. The story transcends genre and as such seems to resonate with a more diverse audience than just the traditional hard core fantasy reader . At the same time I can see where for some who read traditional epic fantasy this story might be lacking in those elements that draw many people to the genre.

    The Wise Man's Fear is a fascinating read. I look forward to many future re-reads. I hope Rothfuss takes his time with the final installment, The Doors of Stone. I hope he continues writing the story that he wants to read because it is the story I want to read as well.
    Finally someone who agrees and has the same view as me about this book. I think Rothfuss' aim was to write the story of Kvothe's life including all the "boring" bits, all of the stuff that goes on behind the scenes as such in other books.

    The aim of this book is not to present you with an epic adventure story it is to present you with the story of a man who has become a legend and how his character was shaped by the things that happened in his life.

    This isn't the right book for people who like death, blood and action every few chapters.

  8. #338
    Quote Originally Posted by artemis-rose View Post
    Finally someone who agrees and has the same view as me about this book. I think Rothfuss' aim was to write the story of Kvothe's life including all the "boring" bits, all of the stuff that goes on behind the scenes as such in other books.

    The aim of this book is not to present you with an epic adventure story it is to present you with the story of a man who has become a legend and how his character was shaped by the things that happened in his life.

    This isn't the right book for people who like death, blood and action every few chapters.
    Well said. It has been nice getting to chat with someone who shares the same appreciation for the story. While the book is selling remarkably well (It is on its 4th printing and it has only been out for two weeks) and is being hailed as a masterpiece by many professional reviewers, critics, and authors, it hasn't received the same appreciation here. I think I have probably posted darn near 10 reviews many of which have gone so far as to name this one of the very best stories ever told in fantasy. None the less artemis we are in the minority around here.

  9. #339
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    Hmmmm...I thought the consensus here was actually favorable. But even if its not, does it matter? I could care less if everyone here hated it, I enjoyed it and that is really all that matters to me. Of course, its always best for an author I like to sell well as this helps with future books being written, but other then that...it doesn't bother me at all. Conversely tons of people can love a book (Twilight anyone?) and that doesn't make it a good book.

  10. #340
    Lemurs!!! Moderator Erfael's Avatar
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    I'd agree that it seems like the opinion here is overwhelmingly favorable.

  11. #341
    Frog Lady Kaeru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alle View Post
    Hmmmm...I thought the consensus here was actually favorable. But even if its not, does it matter? I could care less if everyone here hated it, I enjoyed it and that is really all that matters to me. Of course, its always best for an author I like to sell well as this helps with future books being written, but other then that...it doesn't bother me at all. Conversely tons of people can love a book (Twilight anyone?) and that doesn't make it a good book.
    Ah, yes. Twilight... Grumble, grumble, swear

  12. #342
    I am finding it difficult not to re-read the book again right now. The narrative and prose just draws you back. I read WMF very slowly so I could really savor the reading experience and a few days removed from finishing the book I already miss the story. I have never run into this before in literature. I do typically re-read every book that I like but usually I do so a few months later, particularly if I already have a stack of other books to read. I am tempted to start Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. The White Luck Warrior from Bakker comes out in two weeks and while I am excited about it (Bakker being one of my favorite authors) I can't seem to get KKC out of my head.

    Has anyone else experienced this?

  13. #343
    Lemurs!!! Moderator Erfael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdI View Post
    Has anyone else experienced this?
    No. Too many good books out there to reread things right away. I'll usually come back sometime to my favorites, but not usually within a year or a few.


    One thing that I've been wondering about KKC and the World of Four Corners is how long the days are. Storytelling requires dramatic pauses, cadence, etc. The audio book version of WMF is 40 hours long. Assuming Kvothe talks at even twice the speed of the narrator for the audio book (which would be bad storytelling, particularly from an Edema Ruh), that's still almost 20 hours of talking. That's not counting bandit attacks, lunch hours, etc. How does he fit it all in? Are the days 58 hours long to leave time for sleeping and extraneous other stuff?

  14. #344
    Frog Lady Kaeru's Avatar
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    No, it's because the language is much more efficient than English

  15. #345
    Quote Originally Posted by Erfael View Post
    No. Too many good books out there to reread things right away. I'll usually come back sometime to my favorites, but not usually within a year or a few.


    One thing that I've been wondering about KKC and the World of Four Corners is how long the days are. Storytelling requires dramatic pauses, cadence, etc. The audio book version of WMF is 40 hours long. Assuming Kvothe talks at even twice the speed of the narrator for the audio book (which would be bad storytelling, particularly from an Edema Ruh), that's still almost 20 hours of talking. That's not counting bandit attacks, lunch hours, etc. How does he fit it all in? Are the days 58 hours long to leave time for sleeping and extraneous other stuff?
    Uh...

    Just standard 24 hour days. Wow that is serious nit picking.

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