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  1. #1
    Registered User Werthead's Avatar
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    Rivers of London/Midnight Riot by Ben Aaronovitch

    Peter Grant is a probationary constable in the London Metropolitan Police Force who hasn't decided yet on what branch of the force he wants to serve in. A glorious career in the Case Progression Unit - who do the tedious paperwork other branches don't want - appears to be on the cards until a terrible murder takes places and Grant ends up taking a witness statement from a ghost.

    Assigned to Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale - who deals with all the 'X-Files stuff' no-one else in the Met wants to touch with a bargepole - Grant finds himself tracking down a mystical serial killer with an old axe to grind...

    Rivers of London - published under the somewhat less evocative title Midnight Riot in the USA - is the first original novel by Ben Aaronovitch, better-known to SF fans as a writer on the final two seasons of the original Doctor Who (and as the writer of the excellent Remembrance of the Daleks and its impressive novelization). It's the first in a recurring series featuring Peter Grant and Thomas Nightingale as the Met's supernatural experts, with Moon Over Soho due in just a few months and Whispers Under Ground due early next year. It's a rather lazy comparison, but this looks like it could be the closest we have to a British version of The Dresden Files, with the notable exception that whilst Dresden takes a few books to bed in and really take off, Rivers of London is superb from the very start.

    The book opens with Grant being dragged into the investigation into a spate of killings and random violence erupting across London. This leads him to becoming the apprentice to Thomas Nightingale, both the Met's resident supernatural expert and apparently the last proper wizard in all of Britain. Grant's education in the ways of magic and mysticism is played out in sporadic scenes alongside the developing plot, as he learns how to create balls of light, levitate things around and so forth. This is also an effective way for Aaronovitch to set out the rules of magic in his world: magic generates a sort-of EMP field that reduces silicon components back to their natural state, making it difficult (but not impossible) for magic and technology to coexist.

    Aaronovitch makes the interesting choice to have Grant as someone who is very much aware of the SF&F genre, hence references to things like Doctor Who, The X-Files, the Twilight novels (vampires have a cameo in the book, but no more than that, thankfully), D&D and Cthulu. This could come across as a bit too knowing and a bit too nod-nod, wink-wink, but it actually feels pretty natural and works well. Aaronovitch also has that ability to make the story humourous one moment, dramatic the next and genuinely horrifying the next, spinning the story around and sending it off in a new direction just as you thought you knew what was going on, but always ensuring that everything makes sense.

    The book takes its title from its main subplot: whilst Grant and Nightingale are hunting down the mystical killer, they are also tasked with repairing relations between the warring god and goddess of the Thames, using their tributary stream spirits (personified as the deities' sons and daughters) as intermediaries. This is a clever storyline which personifies parts of London as actual people in a similar manner to Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere, and is just as successful. Given that Rivers of London is also the title of the whole series (according to a couple of listings sites, anyway), I'm guessing these characters will return in later books, particularly the Lady Tyburn, whom Peter develops an antagonistic relationship with.

    It's difficult to think of negatives. Perhaps the characters accept the existence of magic a little too readily, and maybe there's a few underdeveloped elements (some more info on Molly would have been nice). Otherwise, the book progresses along at a brisk pace, but is not rushed. Characterisation is strong, and Aaronovitch juggles the humour and horror very well. At one point he even trumps A Game of Thrones to provide the most shocking defenestration in the history of modern fantasy. His depiction of London is also excellent, painting the city and its history with affection without whitewashing the darker parts of its past (or showing any hesitation in reducing well-known streets to warzones). Also, whilst this is a complete novel, Aaronovitch seeds in some unresolved elements for later novels to pick up and develop.

    Rivers of London (****) is a page-turning, relentlessly entertaining novel which injects some vigour into the urban fantasy subgenre. It's available now in the UK and, under its dubious alternative title, in the USA.

  2. #2
    Jack Bauer Bastard's Avatar
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    Very good news. I have Midnight Riot on pre-order, so hopefully it'll reach me as soon as it comes out.

    I really hate when publishers choose to change titles, but I liked the Midnight Riot cover more. In addition, the sequel seems to follow the same style of cover and interestingly enough it's called Moon Over Soho for both UK and US, so in my opinion they would've been better off keeping the original title I think.

    I had already been highly anticipating this, but your good reaction is getting me excited to read this when it comes.

  3. #3
    Jack Bauer Bastard's Avatar
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    I'm still waiting for my copy to arrive. Bookdepository books have been taking a while to get here as of late (I just received a book that got shipped on November 24)...

    Anyways, it seems like there are a ton of people reading this book, which is nice to see, particularly in this forum where few read Urban Fantasy overall.

    Here's Mark's review for those of you who haven't noticed:
    http://www.sffworld.com/brevoff/686.html

    Really want to read this one, but just nice to see good things being said about it so far.

  4. #4
    http://tinyurl.com/363ogv DurzoBlint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bastard View Post
    I'm still waiting for my copy to arrive. Bookdepository books have been taking a while to get here as of late (I just received a book that got shipped on November 24)...
    That is probably why I am waiting for my Hamilton book to arrive. I was wondering why it had yet to arrive here.

    I am debating about picking this one up still on the fence. I like the idea but trying not to buy too many books this year and instead concentrate on what I already have on the old pile. It is starting to tempt me though.

  5. #5
    Jack Bauer Bastard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DurzoBlint View Post
    That is probably why I am waiting for my Hamilton book to arrive. I was wondering why it had yet to arrive here.

    I am debating about picking this one up still on the fence. I like the idea but trying not to buy too many books this year and instead concentrate on what I already have on the old pile. It is starting to tempt me though.
    Maybe wait until the sequel is out and see how the response is? It should be out within a month I think.

  6. #6
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    Yeah: unlike Wert (at least based on what's above!), I had issues, but I suspect once the series settles it could be a good 'un.

    As I said in the review, I'm interested to see what non-genre readers think. I suspect this one'll be bought as an access point to Urban Fantasy: not as sexy as Dresden, not as nasty/dark (in a good way) as Felix Castor, not as slushily (or steamily!) romantic as... well, take your choice!

    I just feel Ben needs to rein in some of his excesses: there were missteps that pricked the balloon of disbelief I was attempting to inflate....

    Mark
    Mark

  7. #7
    Registered User SLASH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bastard View Post
    Bookdepository books have been taking a while to get here as of late (I just received a book that got shipped on November 24)...
    I was wondering if it was only happening to me . Never received two books that were shipped the end of february. They said they were gonna sent replacements but where can u see that ?
    Hope this isnt't gonna be a standard thing. Any othere good bookshops online ?

  8. #8
    I enjoyed Midnight Riot and I didn't get the sense it had been Americanized. I seem to remember a lot of British idioms and cues like the old guy (real old) in charge of Peter's department reading the Telegraph (the old codger's paper in the UK).

  9. #9
    Jack Bauer Bastard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLASH View Post
    I was wondering if it was only happening to me . Never received two books that were shipped the end of february. They said they were gonna sent replacements but where can u see that ?
    Hope this isnt't gonna be a standard thing. Any othere good bookshops online ?
    My books have been getting quicker as of late. I think the delay was mainly due to it being holiday season + me ordering a bunch of books at the time. And of course, they're shipping from across the world, so I really can't put too much blame in there being delays. And really, most of the shipping problems are about things they have little control over once they give it to the shipping companies. All companies have problems with shipping in some form or another. At least customer service is great with BD, and they send replacements when adequate without any hassle or offer refunds.

    Lately I've been trying to order from Barnes and Noble since I'm getting good prices with their coupons + shipping in orders of $25 of more.

    I still get good prices from BD particularly with pre-orders on mass paperbacks ($5.99), but other than that they're not providing any longer the vast advantage in pricing they used to have, particularly with hardcovers.

    I enjoyed Midnight Riot and I didn't get the sense it had been Americanized. I seem to remember a lot of British idioms and cues like the old guy (real old) in charge of Peter's department reading the Telegraph (the old codger's paper in the UK).
    Other than the "soccer" problem depicted above, I found it same as you. No problem with the level of Americanization with me.
    Last edited by Bastard; March 30th, 2011 at 03:11 PM.

  10. #10
    Registered User Werthead's Avatar
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    Book 2: Moon Over Soho

    Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, the last government-sanctioned wizard in Britain and the guy who handles all the weird stuff the Met is clueless about, and his apprentice Peter Grant are on a new case. The body of a jazz musician is found with strong evidence that he was killed by magic. Grant, whose father is an influential 'almost made it' jazz musician in his own right, finds himself drawn back into his father's troubled life as he hunts down the murderer in Soho.

    Moon Over Soho is the sequel to the recently-published Rivers of London (called Midnight Riot in the USA for reasons that have never been adequately explained), which made an impressive splash when it was released just three months ago. This series has been described as a British take on The Dresden Files and though there are vague similarities, the main difference between them is cultural: Aaronovitch lives and breathes London, its history and culture, and that comes out in his writing (not just here; anyone who's seen his Doctor Who TV serial Remembrance of the Daleks can see it there as well). London in his books, even this alterno-magical London of river spirits, chimeras and emotional vampires, is as much a character as Grant, Nightingale and the slowly-expanding recurring cast of semi-regulars.

    As with the first novel, this is good stuff. The plot unfolds at a cracking pace, there are intriguing backstory revelations about Nightingale and the history of magic, and the characterisation is very strong. There's some effective moments of true horror, and Aaronovitch doesn't brush the consequences of events in the first book under the table. There's some simmering subplots (like Grant's awkward relationship with the river spirits, most notably Lady Tyburn who is in danger of becoming his nemesis) and the introduction of a presumably recurring villain, no doubt sowing the seeds of a multi-book ongoing storyline. In fact, this series is screaming out for a TV adaptation, so applicable is the structure of a stand-alone main plot with ongoing subplots combined with interesting characters.

    There are some minor negatives: one plot twist - where Grant's judgement takes a jump out the window as he gets involved with a potential suspect - I assumed was the result of Grant being bewitched or put under a spell, but it appears not, so is just inexplicable. One bunch of characters - who have the potential to be a sort of jazz-playing equivalent of the Lone Gunmen from The X-Files - are introduced who appear to be important to the plot, but then don't do much here (I assume they'll be back later on). Nightingale has some key scenes but generally sits a lot of the book out. In this sense the TV correlation is less successful as there's a fair amount of loose ends left flapping around where their establishment doesn't accomplish much in this book (whilst others, like the setting up an ongoing villain, work much better). Still, we don't have too long to wait for the third book: Whispers Under Ground will be out in November this year.

    Moon Over Soho (****) has a more focused plot than the first novel but also feels a little more unresolved, so it evens out. It's still a relentlessly entertaining, fast-moving and enjoyable urban fantasy with intriguing hints of greater depth waiting to be explored. The novel is available now in the UK and USA.

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