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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiralcity View Post
    Stephen R. Donaldsons 'Gap Cycle' never recieved much glory. I thought the series was excellent.
    I thought Donaldson went WAY overboard with his antihero thang.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sfinx View Post
    Errr...this being the most overrated series of al times in my opinion

    Back on topic: second the Devil Princes by Jack Vance, and add Stone by Adam Roberts, Helliconia by Brian Aldiss (not underrrated, but perhaps forgotten...), A trace of memory, Dinosaur Beach and others by Keith Laumer, World of Null-A by AE van Vogt.

    Cheers,

    Sfinx.
    The Foundation series was very good. I guess we can stomp on any book, opinions vary to a great degree.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by nquixote View Post
    I thought Donaldson went WAY overboard with his antihero thang.
    I thought it was a great series and over looked by many.

    I wouldnt call Morn Hyland an anti hero.
    Last edited by spiralcity; February 12th, 2011 at 02:11 PM.

  4. #19
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    I really liked the Foundation series.

    Though I'm not sure why people think of it as the seminal space opera series. It has barely any space stuff in it at all. Lensman is the seminal space opera series.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by nquixote View Post
    I thought Donaldson went WAY overboard with his antihero thang.
    it did work though, against all my expectations and continued questions over turning the next page, I really rated it. It's remarkable for being the only place I've seen that compact style of OTT pulled out of the bag.

  6. #21
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    I think Speaker for the Dead is really underrated science fiction. I loved it. Though a completely different kind of book I think it is every bit as good as Ender's Game (sadly cannot say the same for everything else Card has written since).

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearcatmark View Post
    I think Speaker for the Dead is really underrated science fiction.
    Disagree...

    I mean, it won the Hugo and Nebula, and is rated as the 27th best sci-fi book of all time, so how exactly is it underrated?
    Last edited by nquixote; February 12th, 2011 at 11:45 PM.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by nquixote View Post
    Disagree...

    I mean, it won the Hugo and Nebula, and is rated as the 27th best sci-fi book of all time, so how exactly is it underrated?
    I just never hear people talk about it like they do Ender's Game. I also hear it get a bunch of criticism from Ender's Game fans.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by nquixote View Post
    I really liked the Foundation series.

    Though I'm not sure why people think of it as the seminal space opera series. It has barely any space stuff in it at all. Lensman is the seminal space opera series.
    The books focus is on the fall of a galatic empire as predicted by Harry Seldon and the mathematicians. I think it works very well as a space opera.

    The most significant trait of space opera is that settings, characters, battles, powers, and themes tend to be very large-scale.

    This trilogy covers a vast empire over the course of years, so it fits the bill.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiralcity View Post
    The books focus is on the fall of a galatic empire as predicted by Harry Seldon and the mathematicians. I think it works very well as a space opera.

    The most significant trait of space opera is that settings, characters, battles, powers, and themes tend to be very large-scale.

    This trilogy covers a vast empire over the course of years, so it fits the bill.
    Yeah, but we don't get to see any of the space battles 'n stuff!

  11. #26
    Not sure whether these are underrated, or just a bit obscure these days:

    AE van Vogt: Slan, Empire of the Atom, The Book of Ptath
    Robert Heinlein: the Future History series of short stories. Start with the collection The Man Who Sold The Moon
    Robert Sheckley: The Status Civilization

    Agree about Babel 17

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitmouse View Post
    Not sure whether these are underrated, or just a bit obscure these days:

    Robert Sheckley: The Status Civilization

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20919...-h/20919-h.htm

    psik

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by spiralcity View Post
    Stephen R. Donaldsons 'Gap Cycle' never recieved much glory. I thought the series was excellent.
    Agree. Brought something new to the field; at least it did for me! And glad to see Heinlein and van Vogt are still remembered And thx Owl for the reminder to finally catch up on Cordwainer Smith!

    Cheers,

    Sfinx.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by owlcroft View Post
    I was just kidding, though.

    Thank goodness. I took another look and was daunted. But they're all books running somewhere from good to superlative, and I fear most--at least today--are little-known (it's hard to say how well regarded).

    It's hard to know who knows what. Cordwainer Smith is absolute must-read for anyone who wants (or claims) to know anything about sf. Doris Piserchia had a unique and wonderful voice, but who remembers her today? M. A. Foster is as close as one will come to Jack Vance without someone deliberately aping the style. Brian Stableford, for all his huge output, probably couldn't write a bad book if he tried. And so on.
    I've found that Owlcroft and I usually have somewhat similar tastes (Jack Vance is my favorite author), however the only Stableford I've read - The Halcyon Drift, left me underwhelmed. Whereas the only Piserchia I've read I, Zombie, under her Curt Selby pseudonym, left me intrigued enough to place a bunch of her output on my TBR pile.

  15. #30
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    I'm just re-listening to the original Dying Earth short story collection on audiobook right now.

    VANCE IS SO AMAZING. The "Songs of the Dying Earth" collection just can't hold a candle to the real thing. The man is in a class of his own. He is the sci-fi Mark Twain.

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