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  1. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by spiralcity View Post
    Stephen R. Donaldsons 'Gap Cycle' never recieved much glory. I thought the series was excellent.
    I wonder if the first 2-book dose of Thermopylae and Succorso kept enough readers out of the rest of the series. It was certainly an interesting way to start out, but that said - I found the series excellent. He brought similar multi-factional plotstyle to the 3rd covenant series as well.
    Last edited by Woofdog2; March 2nd, 2011 at 09:41 AM.

  2. #47
    trolling > dissertation nquixote's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woofdog2 View Post
    I wonder if the first 2-book dose of Thermopylae and Succorso kept enough readers out of the rest of the series.
    <raises hand>

    Like I said, Donaldson has a fetish for antiheroes. His goal is to make you root for the most despicable character he can. Sometimes, as with Thomas Covenant, this works. Other times, not so much...

  3. #48
    Kim Stanley Robinson, full stop. It's a devil to find any of the Mars books, and every time I bring up The Years of Rice and Salt, even to other sci-fi fans, the reaction tends to be "oh yeah, I think I heard about that once a few years ago..."

    Reviews on Rice and Salt were also rather tepid, and seemed to carry a strain of "yes, yes, Asia and Islam own the world, that's all very nice, could you get back to writing about regular people now?" Which I don't get, as I think it's one of the most audacious alternate histories on the shelves, and definitely a break from the Nazis and/or Confederates and/or CONFEDERATE NAZIS winning Teh War. And Robinson pulls it off, by and large, except for a few author tracts in the latter books.

    Let's not even get into how hard it is to find the California trilogy, which shows three different realities...

  4. #49
    trolling > dissertation nquixote's Avatar
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    Red Mars is OVERrated.

    In fact, it's #5 on the official Overrated List!

  5. #50
    Compiled by Yours Truly, no doubt. :P

    Sorry, any Overrated List that starts at Fahrenheit 451 is sour-grapes bitching to me. Especially if it makes a stop at Ender's Game, both Narnia AND His Dark Materials*, and finishes off with Perdido Street Station (even if I didn't like the ending either). I mean, I have to ask myself, "what do you like? Steampunk and vampires?"

    Nice to meet you, Mr. Quixote!

    *which, by the way, comes from Melville, about Satan. Terribly sorry it sounds like a porn title to you. You might want to watch less porn, lest "Pirates of the Caribbean" sound too much like "PIRATES XXX."

  6. #51
    Mask Specialist Sonja Ravenscroft's Avatar
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    If you don't mind reading Y/A-"Invitation To The Game" by Monica Hughes. A rather well done done, geared to Y/A-I've read it a few times, and always get a little bit more out of each reading.

  7. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by nquixote View Post
    Red Mars is OVERrated.

    In fact, it's #5 on the official Overrated List!

    Haha that list is great. I like this one for Tau Zero (which I have not actually read):
    "A mean tough alpha-male dude takes over in a crisis, beats up anyone who disagrees with him, solves every single technical problem by sheer force of inspiration, bangs all the hot women, and becomes king. In between are long stretches of people sitting around being depressed. "

  8. #53
    Webmaster, Great SF&F owlcroft's Avatar
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    Hm.

    At a glance, I'd say it's actually much less wrong than one might suspect such a thing to be just on the title. In fact, except for (curiously) the first and the last entries, it looks fairly well on point. Indeed, though I think both Fahrenheit and Station are good books, I'd have to say they are somewhat over-rated--I, at least, have trouble with the idea of either as a "classic". (Though I think that Station suffers a bit in some readers' minds because they lose track of which character the book actually revolves around--the Garuda man--because he's not the center-action character.) I'll stop here because to say more would be serious thread drift.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiralcity View Post
    Stephen R. Donaldsons 'Gap Cycle' never recieved much glory. I thought the series was excellent.
    I enjoyed this series as well.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueRoscoe View Post
    Compiled by Yours Truly, no doubt. :P

    Sorry, any Overrated List that starts at Fahrenheit 451 is sour-grapes bitching to me. Especially if it makes a stop at Ender's Game, both Narnia AND His Dark Materials*, and finishes off with Perdido Street Station (even if I didn't like the ending either). I mean, I have to ask myself, "what do you like? Steampunk and vampires?"
    Mmm, funny you should ask!

    See:
    The List of Best Sci-Fi Novels
    The List of Best Fantasy Series
    The List of Underrated Sci-Fi and Fantasy
    The List of Best Space Opera

    Hey, you can't make an Overrated List without trashing some highly rated favorites, now can you? Believe it or not, lots of people said my list wasn't brave enough...

  11. #56
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    As for Fahrenheit 451 being overrated, one of my criteria is that if your book comes out after a very similar earlier work, and is inferior in quality to that older work, and yet is more remembered or acclaimed than the earlier, better work, then your book is overrated. If 1984 and Brave New World, still IMHO the best dystopia novels ever written, had not been released decades before Fahrenheit 451, and if Fahrenheit 451's ideas were not completely and utterly derivative of those other two books (the surveillence-state fascism of 1984 pasted onto the consumerism of Brave New World), then I would not count it overrated...

  12. #57
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    The overrated list posted was funny to read but there was some mention of generally underrated fantasy in it.

    Underrated SF is hard to pin down as so much changes in SF. Most good SF is set maybe 20-100 years ahead and probably references changes only 10 years out. It is hard not to be proved wrong 30 years later. That has certainly happened to many authors and in many cases whole sub-genres.

  13. #58
    Asgard's Secret (also titled Journey to the Center) by Brian Stablefod.

    The first Deathworld novel by Harry Harrison.

    Icerigger from Alan Dean Foster.

    George Effinger's When Gravity Fails.

    A Trace of Memory by Keith Laumer.

  14. #59
    Live Long & Suffer psikeyhackr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Raffles View Post
    The first Deathworld novel by Harry Harrison.
    Deathworld, by Harry Harrison
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/28346...-h/28346-h.htm

    The Ethical Engineer, (Deathworld II) by Henry Maxwell Dempsey
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/30964...-h/30964-h.htm

    Deathworld II is more technologically interesting.

    psik

  15. #60
    Webmaster, Great SF&F owlcroft's Avatar
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    Just a note...

    Asgard's Secret (also titled Journey to the Center) by Brian Stablefod.
    The original version, Journey, was later re-written as Secret by Stableford to better fit the complete "Asgard" trilogy, of which it is the first book.

    The others are, in order, Asgard's Conquerors (originally titled Invaders from the Centre) and Asgard's Heart (originally titled The Centre Cannot Hold); these also are expanded re-writes.

    As always with Stableford, excellent, intelligent science fiction.

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