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  1. #16
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    Is Lavondyss a direct sequel? There're several more sequels right? Anyone read them all?

  2. #17
    Lemurs!!! Moderator Erfael's Avatar
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    Not sure what you mean by "direct" there. The main character is Harry Keeton's little sister. Wiki has this to say:

    "Despite having a new primary character, Lavondyss is a sequel to Mythago Wood because several characters provide links between the novels; the events in Mythago Wood set into motion events that drive the protagonists' actions in Lavondyss. Reading the novel Mythago Wood will illuminate Lavondyss for first time readers."

  3. #18
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    By direct sequel I meant same characters, setting. Looks like Lavondyss is halfway there. Keaton's sister is an interesting choice of protagonist, which reminds me that I'd been meaning to discuss Keating some more. I'll post on him later...

  4. #19
    lost thing spaziocain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erfael View Post
    So, those of you who chimed in in the first few days of the month with one-line "discussion" points -- care to elaborate a little? I'd like to hear other people's thoughts as well. If it worked, what do you feel worked? If it didn't for you, I'd also really like to hear that. On what level didn't it work for you?
    My post was really intended to mock Pvt's one line, nonconstructive post. I rarely reread books because I'm such a slow reader. It's been 13 years since I read Mythago Wood so most of the details are sketchy to me. I do remember my response to book vividly and I am surprised by some of the discussion here. I remember the book becoming more riveting in last parts of the novel as Ryhope Woods is being explored. I remember the tension that exuded from the lushly evoked atmosphere. I remember the feeling of primal danger that Holdstock creates in the interstices of the ancient and the modern. Yes, this is a book with wonderful concepts, but I also remember it being brilliantly plotted and written.

  5. #20
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    Keaton's role is an interesting one. At first I only saw two real points in the character: He lets us know there are other Mythago woods apart from Ryhope, and his journal provides external perspective of Stephen's situation. However, in one of his later journal entries he begins to ponder whether he himself will become a myth and this is when I realised he was already filling an archetype - the sidekick.

  6. #21
    Lemurs!!! Moderator Erfael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eventine View Post
    Keaton's role is an interesting one. At first I only saw two real points in the character: He lets us know there are other Mythago woods apart from Ryhope, and his journal provides external perspective of Stephen's situation. However, in one of his later journal entries he begins to ponder whether he himself will become a myth and this is when I realised he was already filling an archetype - the sidekick.
    I hadn't considered one way or another whether Keaton fit into the mythology. Good catch there, Ev. I agree completely.


    spaz -- This was a reread for me and I had a lot going on on the last day I was reading, but I was trying to get through it anyway. So it's possible that I didn't allow myself to soak it in as it deserved. I don't think it's a book that takes well to being pressed through, and I may have done it that injustice this time around as I was rereading more as a refresher than as an experience unto itself.

  7. #22
    There is no tomorrow RedMage's Avatar
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    I've been haunting the forums constantly for quite a while. Why did I only see this now? Mythago Wood and Lavondyss are two of my favorite books!

    I totally agree with everything Erfael has said. However, I did grow confused quite often while reading Mythago Wood and frequently had to go back and reread passages. This, I think, is due to reading too much of the swords/fireballs stuff of fantasy and not enough conceptual tales such as this book. I have not read it too recently (a few years now) so I should probably go back and read it again, see if that helps at all.

    To answer your questions, Eventine, about the following books: I read Lavondyss 2 years ago. Great book! Real world relationships were difficult for me to place, however, and it dealt with those enough that you need a firm grounding on who's who and how they connect to this person. Mostly, the problem for me lay in the MC's father--in no way was he portrayed to be older than 40 yrs old, definitely not old enough to have a twenty--thirty-something son and a much younger daughter. But then, I guess, as everything is seen through the MC's eyes, you can say that kids do not place their parents in age brackets. That's something that comes with a bit more age than what she has/had. Also, yes, the second book is a much sadder tale. I can see how people might find it hard to get through. However, I did not find it very confusing for the swords/fireballs people like the first book. Perhaps because I had read Mythago Wood and had all the background from that that Lavondyss depends upon so heavily?

    I've also read the third book, The Hollowing, and that was this last fall. If you really like the myth-world/forest-world as someone called it (can't remember nor find it now) then I do not recommend it. At least, don't go into it expecting it to be the same. From my pov, Holdstock did that same sort of thing that some other fantasy writers have done in long series: in early books, distance from A to B takes 1 week to travel by horseback. Later books in the series, it takes maybe an hour or two by the same mode of transportation. Only Holdstock did it with the wood. Still a good book, but totally different I thought than the first two. And so much so that I don't know if I want to get the fourth.

    I know this is a discussion about Mythago Wood and I am sorry for going off topic. Just trying to answer Eventine's questions about the sequels and any that others might have. Glad to see that Mythago Wood is a BOTM, sorry I can't give more to the actual discussion of it.

  8. #23
    I like to rock the party Corporal Blues's Avatar
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    I recently read Mythago Wood myself. While I liked it, I wouldn't say that I loved it.

    A snippet from my thoughts:

    The book got off to a slow start, taking its time to set up the characters, and the forest, which in many ways is a character itself. The slow start was a bit frustrating because I knew that eventually, the book had to go and explore the forest, which is the most interesting thing, but it took a while to actually get to that point. Things do pick up a bit once the quest through the forest begins, but overall, the pacing is a bit on the slow side here.

    Though the primary character, Steven is decently developed, albeit a bit uninteresting as far as lead characters go, he serves the story well by being a great conduit for the reader to experience the woods and the mythagos through. Steven is every bit as perplexed, overwhelmed, and unprepared for the mysteries of the forest as I would be, so in that sense, his experiences, reactions, and emotions come across as instantly understandable and real. I thought this quality was a nice touch and made me feel like I was experiencing the dread, and craziness that was the Ryhope Wood.

    The forest itself was basically a character and in my mind, the star of the show. I wanted to know more about it, I wanted to explore it, and learn the secrets of the wood. Holdstock did a great job by creating a mysterious and creepy setting and then bringing it life on the page. I really felt like all of my senses were engaged, and operating at full capacity as Steven journeyed through the forest where unknown dangers, and mysteries lurked. This made for a memorable reading experience.

    My one gripe, aside from the slow pacing, was that the one female character, Guiwenneth, was poorly developed. She came across to me as more of a pretty object for the men to fall in love with than an actual character. Some of this was compacted by the fact that for much of the novel she couldn't speak modern English, so she didn't have much dialog, but aside from apparently being handy with a knife, a fact that was told, but never shown, she didn't have a lot going on. The lack of character development with Guiwenneth made it harder for me to believe that George, Christian, and Steven would all fall madly in love with her, which ended up taking away from the story since Steven's love for Guiwenneth is what drove him into the forest in the first place.
    The fantasy elements really resonated with me though, Holdstock did a great job of making them seem...fantastic, and totally out of place in the normal run of things.

    Solid book, but not completely my cup of tea.

  9. #24
    Registered User Dorothyd's Avatar
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    it's taking me a while to get round this site, apologies, work tends to get in the way, writing that is!
    Mythago Wood is one of my all time favourite books, I was in communication with Robert Holdstock in my early writing days and treasured the friendship. His passing deeply saddened me.
    Mythago Wood is a complex book of many levels, it depends on your particular interest which way you read it. I am mostly a horror reader rather than fantasy, there are strong horror elements in it, but I did get carried away with the myths and multi layers of the book on my recent re-read, a few months ago, when I wanted to take a sideways trip from my usual reading. One thing I have, which is precious to me, is a photograph Robert took of a tree with stretched out branches which looks remarkably like a green man in a forest, indicative of Mythago Wood.

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