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  1. #241
    Filthy Assistants! Moderator kater's Avatar
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    Almost entirely RotCG and SW.

  2. #242
    Registered User Carlyle Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris777 View Post
    Finished Midnight Tides.

    I feel like each book so far has been better than the last. Is that a general consensus, or am i just not remembering how good the previous one was?

    So Ironbars is pretty tough huh? How is the Malazan Empire even winning when they have been going up against Brood, Rake, Crimson Guard, and those Mott Irregulars?

    I'm going to be starting Night of Knives tonight. Hope it's good. After reading a lot about the Crimson I can't wait to read more about that group. Do we get to see a lot of the Crimson Guard in later books? Or mainly in ROTCG?
    It was hard to tell for me if they got better because of my perosnal preference for some characters, but I woould say Erikson's improved as one would imagine after writing a few million words in ten years, and as I got a better graps of things that were hinted at and started figuring things out that increased the enjoyment.

    And yes, as Kater said, Crimson Guard are almost entirely in RotCG and SW.

    In fact there's a major event in Return of the Crimson Guard that in my opinion explained a major event that happened in Gardens of the Moon. Did anyone else make a connection?

  3. #243
    OK so I'm reading Night of Knives. And my thoughts just keep coming back to me. Surley/Laseen had said to someone somewhere(can someone please pull that quote up?) that the "gods" underestimate humans into thinking they can't make long term planning. Long term of course meaning centuries upon centuries past their life spans, such as a god would.

    So with that quote I've always assumed everything Malazan has done up to this point was calculated. The death of Kallenved and Dancer, reborn into Shadowthrone and The Rope. The Ascension of the Bridge Burners. The..now..alliance with Brood and Rake.

    So reading this book about what happened on that night, it seems there is no undertone that this was planned. Unless...Only Surley, Dancer, and the Emperor know about it. Maybe a couple others. Obviously Dassem and his sword didn't.

    Which leads me to my next question.

    Why did Temper try and kill Dassem when he was on the table? I realize that he somehow knew that would wake him up. But how? Because he knew Hood wouldn't allow Dassem to die, because he's afraid of letting him in? Or what happened there...that Dassem was basically in a Coma...but woke up at the last second before the knife penetrated his heart?

  4. #244
    I really wish I like these books. Maybe I should give them another shot.

  5. #245
    Quote Originally Posted by chris777 View Post
    Why did Temper try and kill Dassem when he was on the table? I realize that he somehow knew that would wake him up. But how? Because he knew Hood wouldn't allow Dassem to die, because he's afraid of letting him in? Or what happened there...that Dassem was basically in a Coma...but woke up at the last second before the knife penetrated his heart?
    I think it was because Hood wouldn't let Dassem die but I can't remember the reason.

  6. #246
    Quote Originally Posted by Lordwalker View Post
    I really wish I like these books. Maybe I should give them another shot.
    How much have you read?

    I think in order to like Malazan you have to do two things

    1) Go in with the mindset of having to trudge through some stuff to get to some good stuff. Have no expectations about the books
    2) Read at least the first 2books.

    To each his own. Some people won't like them. Myself, I'm having a hard time getting past the way SE makes some of his characters think. They all sound like him.

  7. #247
    Registered User Carlyle Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris777 View Post
    So with that quote I've always assumed everything Malazan has done up to this point was calculated. The death of Kallenved and Dancer, reborn into Shadowthrone and The Rope. The Ascension of the Bridge Burners. The..now..alliance with Brood and Rake.

    So reading this book about what happened on that night, it seems there is no undertone that this was planned. Unless...Only Surley, Dancer, and the Emperor know about it. Maybe a couple others. Obviously Dassem and his sword didn't.
    In a world as complex as Malazan, would it make more sense for there to be a single "scheme" behind everything, or multiple schemes? You're not far away (by Malazan standards-haha) from some serious revelations. I'm jealous of the fun you're having.

  8. #248
    Quote Originally Posted by Carlyle Clark View Post
    In a world as complex as Malazan, would it make more sense for there to be a single "scheme" behind everything, or multiple schemes? You're not far away (by Malazan standards-haha) from some serious revelations. I'm jealous of the fun you're having.
    It is fun, and I will miss it when it's gone. In 2012 I will get to read the ending of Wheel of Time and Malazan both. What a great thing to look forward to huh?! Not to mention my boy is due in April, so that's good too!

    And again...all my question are asking for spoiler free answers. Which so far nobody has said anything. Just don't want that "Oh yes you are right, because at the end Kellenvad ends up devouring the crippled god turning him into the God of gods, cool ending huh?!"
    =)

  9. #249
    Omnibus Prime Moderator PeterWilliam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris777 View Post
    Because he knew Hood wouldn't allow Dassem to die,...
    Once you have completed Toll the Hounds, reconsider these questions in light of the interaction between Dassem and Hood.

  10. #250
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWilliam View Post
    Once you have completed Toll the Hounds, reconsider these questions in light of the interaction between Dassem and Hood.
    Ahh ok. Thanks!

  11. #251
    Great to see others getting into Malazan, it’s my personal favorite fantasy series.

    Add me to the group that thinks every book in the series is great, 6, 7 and the last book (9+10) being my favorites.

    I have seen several suggestions for a reading order and I wanted to give my opinion on the matter:

    Book 1-5 of Erikson

    Night of Knives - reading this one here doesn’t spoil anything, and it introduces characters that appear in Erikson book 6

    Book 6 of Erikson

    Return of the Crimson Guard - This is a direct continuation of book 6, and should be read at this point so that the reader doesn’t forget the details of the situation in the Malazan empire at the end of book 6. This book has to be read before book 9(Dust of Dreams), or it will spoil great moments in ROTCG.

    Book 7-8 of Erikson

    Stonewielder - I don’t want to spoil it, but because of certain characters it would feel really weird to read this after book 9-10.

    Book 9-10 of Erikson


    I believe someone wondered about Esslemonts future books, the titles (as of now) are:

    Orb, Sceptre, Throne
    City in the Jungle
    Assail

    Assail is supposedly going to be written as a conclusion to the entire Malazan series.

    Erikson is writing a trilogy about the Tiste Andii before they left their home world, the first book is already finished and will be called "Forge of Darkness". When he is finished with this series he will write a "Toblaikai trilogy", which I personally assume will be about Karsa.
    Last edited by C-1; December 23rd, 2011 at 07:30 AM.

  12. #252
    Quote Originally Posted by C-1 View Post
    Great to see others getting into Malazan, it’s my personal favorite fantasy series.

    Add me to the group that thinks every book in the series is great, 6, 7 and the last book (9+10) being my favorites.

    I have seen several suggestions for a reading order and I wanted to give my opinion on the matter:

    Book 1-5 of Erikson

    Night of Knives - reading this one here doesn’t spoil anything, and it introduces characters that appear in Erikson book 6

    Book 6 of Erikson

    Return of the Crimson Guard - This is a direct continuation of book 6, and should be read at this point so that the reader doesn’t forget the details of the situation in the Malazan empire at the end of book 6. This book has to be read before book 9(Dust of Dreams), or it will spoil great moments in ROTCG.

    Book 7-8 of Erikson

    Stonewielder - I don’t want to spoil it, but because of certain characters it would feel really weird to read this after book 9-10.

    Book 9-10 of Erikson
    Ya this is the order I will be going with. Thanks!
    I believe someone wondered about Esslemonts future books, the titles (as of now) are:

    Orb, Sceptre, Throne
    City in the Jungle
    Assail

    Assail is supposedly going to be written as a conclusion to the entire Malazan series.
    That is good news! Personally I like SE better than ICE, but any conclusion is good.


    I finished Night of Knives the other night. Was pretty good. I have several likes and dislikes but nothing new. It was worth it for that backstory. Though I would have liked it if it showed how Kellanved ascended. I know it shows her is in Shadow now, controlling it. But it's still pretty confusing. What throne did he take? We now know it's only a placeholder for the real throne...do they know that right now?

    I'm actually starting Earth Sea trilogy with my wife. We both so far as not very fond of UKL's writing style. I really don't know how to word what my issue is. It just feels like she is telling a story to some young person, and writing it down as she goes. Meaning 2 things. The story feels written like what you would say to someone telling a story, rather than what you would write. And it feels as if it's being told to a 12yr old. Things are explained that need not be. Maybe it's cause this was written in the 60's? Maybe that's her style? Just this book? It gets better? Or I'm coming from straight for Malazan, so it's just TOO different not to notice?
    Last edited by chris777; December 27th, 2011 at 11:38 AM.

  13. #253
    Reader Moderator NickeeCoco's Avatar
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    Well, since this thread exists, I've decided to make use of it too. I started the first book, Gardens of the Moon today. I'm about five chapters in. Right now I'm lukewarm toward it. My interest is piqued, story wise, but I don't like the writing style very much. I prefer efficient prose, and this is bordering on purple.

    As an example: The first two paragraphs of the prologue talk about a weather vane. A weather vane that has nothing to do with anything. To me, that sort of thing is gratuitous. I'd rather have my first introduction to a character to be well. . . an introduction to a character, not an inanimate object that's only purpose is to set a scene and tell us it's windy. There are far more efficient ways to tell us it's windy.

    But there's something in the story there, so I'll soldier on.

    EDIT: I'd also like to add that I like that he doesn't spoon feed the reader information plot-wise. I like that he only gifts little hints here and there. I only know what the character knows. That's an aspect I do enjoy.
    Last edited by NickeeCoco; December 27th, 2011 at 12:18 PM.

  14. #254
    Quote Originally Posted by NickeeCoco View Post
    Well, since this thread exists, I've decided to make use of it too. I started the first book, Gardens of the Moon today. I'm about five chapters in. Right now I'm lukewarm toward it. My interest is piqued, story wise, but I don't like the writing style very much. I prefer efficient prose, and this is bordering on purple.

    As an example: The first two paragraphs of the prologue talk about a weather vane. A weather vane that has nothing to do with anything. To me, that sort of thing is gratuitous. I'd rather have my first introduction to a character to be well. . . an introduction to a character, not an inanimate object that's only purpose is to set a scene and tell us it's windy. There are far more efficient ways to tell us it's windy.

    But there's something in the story there, so I'll soldier on.

    EDIT: I'd also like to add that I like that he doesn't spoon feed the reader information plot-wise. I like that he only gifts little hints here and there. I only know what the character knows. That's an aspect I do enjoy.
    As far as a little bit more of an understanding of the series and how the world operates. READ THE REREAD TOO!. It's great. A lot of the questions that I might put in this thread were addressed in either one of the readers summary, or the comments.

  15. #255
    Reader Moderator NickeeCoco's Avatar
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    I just read the Gardens of the Moon Prologue and Chapter One comments. While I agree with a lot of what they say, I'm a little confused on one part: Why are they so confused and why do they think they have to pay special attention to things? I'm not one for bragging, and please don't think I am, but I got all that when I read the prologue and chapter one. Isn't that how writing is supposed to be? At least, that's how I expect it to be. I expect for there to be little hints and nudges and veneered references. I actively look for them as I read, no matter what it is I'm reading. It's a natural instinct. I want to know as much as I can and I'm not going to gain that knowledge if I just let words slip by. I guess that's what I meant about the he's good at not spoon feeding comment I made. I like books that force you to be involved, not just there for a ride.

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