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  1. #16
    http://tinyurl.com/363ogv DurzoBlint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mars View Post
    Alfred Bester - The Stars My Destination
    Richard Morgan - Takeshi Kovacs
    Jack Vance - Planet of Adventure, Demon Princes
    I would recommend Morgan's Kovacs as well. Future Earth with a "clone" like technology although not exactly a clone. Good bit of adventure and mystery. Plenty of fighting. Should be right up your alley.

  2. #17
    Tomposer
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    Yep Peter F. Hamilton mostly fits your criteria very well.

    Having said that, I have major issues with parts of his writing. His hip lingo for Ozzie Isaacs was almost put-down-the-book irritating, especially to begin with. IMO certain philosophical issues about identity surrounding the re-lifing tech upon which the story hinges should have been given a cursory nod, but was left being perplexing.* His narration is dry and sometimes tedius, in those parts of the story where not much is going on.

    What he does really well, however, is the bad guys. The primes are totally kick ass, and quite believable. They're menacing and genuinely scary - a reader will want to shoot them often. He's also pretty good with the action scenes which are involving.





    * Namely, how is an identity preserved when someone is re-lifed; although their memories are transferred, is this sufficient to preserve identity? Case in point: Dudley Bose - his original person is presumed dead on Dyson Alpha, yet his memories are re-lifed; later the original Bose escapes Dyson Alpha (in the form of a Prime), and ultimately the two meet up. If only one is the original Bose, this inductively suggests that re-lifing, though successfully preserving memories, does not in fact preserve a person's identity.

  3. #18
    Live Long & Suffer psikeyhackr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floydman625 View Post
    Honor Harrington series are very good but I find the space ships must be the worst looking ships ever conceived. If you watched any of the str trek series you'll see weber needs an artist!!!
    That is funny.

    The first time I saw Star Trek I though that was one of the stupidest looking ships I had ever seen. Now it's NORMAL.

    But the design of ships to operate in a vacuum will depend on function and the physics of the propulsion system.

    psik

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by DurzoBlint View Post
    I would recommend Morgan's Kovacs as well. Future Earth with a "clone" like technology although not exactly a clone. Good bit of adventure and mystery. Plenty of fighting. Should be right up your alley.
    yes, agreed.
    Last edited by pox; July 18th, 2011 at 03:32 PM.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by DurzoBlint View Post
    I would recommend Morgan's Kovacs as well. Future Earth with a "clone" like technology although not exactly a clone. Good bit of adventure and mystery. Plenty of fighting. Should be right up your alley.
    yes, agreed...

  6. #21
    Picky Reader/Writer Jade1157's Avatar
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    Oh wow! Not long after I made the post I found out I was moving and then didn't have internet for over a month! This is an awesome surprise and I'm eager to check out all these books!

    Thanks to everyone for the recommendations! I really appreciate it and hope some of these novels will peak an interest

  7. #22
    I can't believe no one's recommended this.

    The Gap Cycle by Stephen R. Donaldson.

    Also I'll second The Night's Dawn trilogy, but I don't think Revelation Space would work for the OP.

  8. #23
    would the jack mcdevitt books qualify in this discussion? i've only read 2 of the alex benedict series and the first priscilla hutchins installment. so far have been very pleased with them and seem to have several of the things the o.p. mentioned liking.

  9. #24
    Poul Anderson wrote a lot of stories set in period from the roman period through the medieval age, including stories set in the roman historical frame but in germanic or other non-roman territory. One huge novel which I have had trouble getting through is set in the period of Maximum's rebellion, The King of Ys. All of his other stuff I have read very quickly. Many of the stories in this period involve some time-travel element, some others are set natively there without time-travel or other advanced tech, and are more correctly called historical fiction.

    He wrote extensively in the viking age, both saga-style stories (war of the gods, which reads like a saga put to prose, but with all the major saga story elements), and more historical (a trilogy about harald hardraada, who died at stamford bridge after a singularly extraordinary life in 1066). Anderson was danish-american and spent some of his early years in denmark, notably, which accounts for his saga interest. The stories in this period are non-scifi, though.

    adding to vance mention - big planet, showboat world, space opera?
    Last edited by Woofdog2; October 28th, 2011 at 01:43 PM.

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