Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 81
  1. #61
    Registered User SilentDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    A house on a hill somewhere in Australia.
    Posts
    185
    Blog Entries
    3
    As far as adaptations go... I liked it enough that I didn't feel ripped off, however it wasn't great. It hasn't been a good year for movies.

  2. #62
    Registered User JunkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Slap Bang in the Middle of Infinity
    Posts
    1,602
    Well I finally got round to it and was really disappointed. I know the books aren't great literature and haven't dated very well. After 100 years most of Edgar Rice Burrough's creative imaginings are sad, old, worked to death clichés, but even so I really think they should have stuck to the book a lot more than they did. For one thing the film took an age to get going. After a prologue set on Mars that left me going 'Duh what? I don't remember this from the book. Where did these guys come from?' a few times, we moved into a double flashback that took far too long to get the central character established. (During the film brief, tertiary flashbacks also occurred. It's an irrational dislike but three layers of flashback annoys the tits off me.) It's a full 20+ or so minutes before we're anywhere near the start of the story as it appeared in the book. By the final act I just thought it was an unholy mess and I just wanted it to finish as soon as possible. Somehow they managed to loose the very thing that made the book so captivating for me as a kid. The aged, decayed, and dwindling world sunk to barbarism and faded glories, lost cities, the whole planet dying - there's a few nods to this in the film but it's a sad state of affairs when the Asylum knock-buster version with Tracy Lords in a Princess Leia slave costume starts to look good by comparison - at least thematically (and that was **** film).

  3. #63
    Doomfarer
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cair Paravel by the Shining Sea
    Posts
    415
    Quote Originally Posted by JunkMonkey View Post
    The aged, decayed, and dwindling world sunk to barbarism and faded glories, lost cities, the whole planet dying - there's a few nods to this in the film
    One idea that was good and Burroughs did not think of was a group (Zodanga) deliberately tracking down resources in order to maintain their civilisation. Then again he was more interested in chivalry, romance and slaying the bad guys and gals.

    Quote Originally Posted by JunkMonkey View Post
    it's a sad state of affairs when the Asylum knock-buster version with Tracy Lords in a Princess Leia slave costume starts to look good by comparison - at least thematically (and that was **** film).
    Only seen the artwork, but agree with the sentiments expressed.

  4. #64
    Registered User ian_sales's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    321
    I have seen both, and the Disney version is greatly superior. After seeing a number of negative reviews of John Carter, it strikes me that the treatment was too clever for the material. For example, I couldn't understand why they didn't reveal what had happened to Carter's family, but when they did finally do so, it was perfectly timed. And the double ending, the first downbeat and the second upbeat, was a genius move. There were some longeurs, and a tendency to exposition in places, but the only film better than John Carter that I've seen this year is Dredd.

  5. #65
    Registered User JunkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Slap Bang in the Middle of Infinity
    Posts
    1,602
    One idea that was good and Burroughs did not think of was a group (Zodanga) deliberately tracking down resources in order to maintain their civilisation. Then again he was more interested in chivalry, romance and slaying the bad guys and gals.
    If I was Philip Reeve's lawyers I would be taking a long hard look at that aspect. That's the essential idea behind his Mortal Engines books. Not that anything was done with the idea of a moving city, apart from a derivative, physics ignoring, Nu Star Wars type chase between the city's moving legs.

  6. #66
    Registered User ian_sales's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    321
    Quote Originally Posted by JunkMonkey View Post
    If I was Philip Reeve's lawyers I would be taking a long hard look at that aspect. That's the essential idea behind his Mortal Engines books. Not that anything was done with the idea of a moving city, apart from a derivative, physics ignoring, Nu Star Wars type chase between the city's moving legs.
    You can't copyright ideas.

  7. #67
    Registered User JunkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Slap Bang in the Middle of Infinity
    Posts
    1,602
    You can't copyright ideas.
    You're right. You can't copyright ideas but you can copyright what you do with them - like use them as the basis for a work of fiction. If someone then comes along and copies an element of that work of fiction it is called 'plagiarism'*. I don't suppose for a second that Reeve's lawyers think they would stand an earthly but I'll bet you 53 quatludes that someone in the office thought about it.

    One unfortunate moment I forgot to mention that helped my general headshaking despair about John Carter was the straight to camera, breaking the fourth wall moment when we first see Dejah Thoris. My mind jumped (as it would to any connoisseur of overblown, over-expensive, SF film failures) to the last time I saw an SF princess doing the straight to camera, breaking the fourth wall thing. "The beginning is a very delicate time. Know then that it is the year 10191. The Known Universe is ruled by the Padishah Emperor Shaddam IV, my father. In this time, the most..." suddenly I was in David Lynch's Dune. Took me a bit of time to get out, especially as beginnings are very delicate times and this film's was a right dog's dinner.



    * or 'homage' - depends how literate/generous you think your audience is going to be.
    Last edited by JunkMonkey; October 28th, 2012 at 09:57 AM. Reason: 'forth' indeed!

  8. #68
    Registered User ian_sales's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    321
    Dune is a greatly under-rated film. If you watch the "television version", there are hints of what Lynch was trying to achieve and had he succeeded the result would have been a masterpiece.

  9. #69
    Registered User JunkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Slap Bang in the Middle of Infinity
    Posts
    1,602
    I have watched both those versions of Lynch's Dune and you're right (once you get past the incredibly awful opening of the Smithee TV version.) Both are fragmented messes. Whether the sum of the parts would have been 'great' I don't know. I suspect they would. I'd love to see a 'restored', 'original cut', or whatever.

  10. #70
    Illustrious Gambler saintjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    in a pimped out airship baby
    Posts
    4,528
    Just saw it and I liked it. I mean there were some slow parts but most movies that are great have some slow parts so wtf. I'm starting to realize I hate talking about movies here.

  11. #71
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Hobbit Towers, England
    Posts
    11,712
    Blog Entries
    126
    This was the long version or the regular version of Dune, SJ?

    The super-long version of Dune is one of those 'holy grails' for many film buffs: rather like Blade Runner used to be. From what I remember, most of the extra footage was destroyed so the chances of seeing an Ultimate version of Dune is very remote.

    Would love to be proved wrong, though!
    Mark

  12. #72
    Registered User ian_sales's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    321
    There are at least three "special edition" DVDs of Dune. The UK one boasts "lynch's director's cut" and is 137 minutes long. The US edition includes both the original theatrical cut and the "extended version (directed by Alan Smithee, screenplay by Judas Booth)". The theatrical cut is also 137 minutes long, but lengths differ between NTSC and PAL/SECAM so it's unlikely the UK director's cut is the same as the theatrical release. I also have a German 3-disc "Paradise Edition" - it includes a plaster sandworm - containing (I think) a restored version of the theatrical release and a 180-minute "die TV-Fassung", which I take to be the television version. Legend has it, though, that Lynch filmed over 5½ hours of footage, but little of it was saved after the studio cut the movie for release. I have the original script for the film somewhere, but I've never gone through it to see what's missing from the finished product.

  13. #73
    Registered User JunkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Slap Bang in the Middle of Infinity
    Posts
    1,602
    A rundown of all known versions of Lynch's Dune on the Inaccurate Movie Database: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087182/alternateversions

  14. #74
    A mere player txshusker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Tx
    Posts
    713
    I actually didn't mind John Carter as much the second time i watched it as i did the first time. Don't know why.

    I prefer the Dune mini-series vs the truncated Lynch over dubbed version. There are some good parts within the Lynch version, but I'm not a fan of the overall film.

  15. #75
    Registered User ian_sales's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    321
    I watched John Carter again last night, and it impressed me just as much as it did the first time I saw it. It's not perfect - that prologue is completely unnecessary, and the bit where Mark Strong explains the plot is somewhat inelegant. But the battle with the Warhoon, intercut with Carter burying is wife, is a classic piece of cinema and beautifully done.

    I didn't like the miniseries of Dune - it seemed to be the director wanted it to be Shakespeare... but it's a long way from being that. The sequel, Children of Dune, I thought much better. Some of the acting in both series was terrible, though - especially the bloke who played Gurney Halleck.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •