Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18
  1. #1

    Time span of multi-volume epics

    I was reading the Wheel of Time wiki and was surprised when I came across a timeline in which it was revealed that the entire series--all 14 books, from Two Rivers to the grand finale--took about two years. Two years. I found that a bit off-putting - not simply because the books themselves were published over 23 years, but also because of how much occured in those 14 books and much the characters developed, at least in terms of their abilities. I mean, I could see five or six years, but two? It seems a bit off. I think Memory, Sorrow and Thorn was similarly short.

    Anyhow, I'm wondering if people can post the rough time spans of different multi-volume epics? I'm not talking about prologues and ancient history flashbacks, like in Malazan, but the period of time that the protagonist(s) experienced from start to finish of the narrative.

    What others?

  2. #2
    Registered User StephenPorter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    389
    Raymond Feist's Midkemia series ran for a couple centuries, I think.

    Tamora Pierce's Tortall books are difficult to judge since they span a wide variety of main characters. The primary books in the series probably go for about 30 years or more. The prequel trilogy takes place about 200 years prior, and spans at least three years, probably a bit more. Her Circle of magic series has spanned well over a decade for the characters.

    Glen Cook's Black Company books probably spanned over 30 years of activity, long enough for the characters in their twenties at the start to reach old age by the end, but I think a few of them got frozen in time for a while, so it may be more like 50 years or more. I would guess that Garret has spanned about a decade over the course of the series, but time is never kept track of much in that series. The Dread Empire books certainly went past the decade mark as well, but I'm not sure just how long those events took.

    Zelazny's Amber books are pretty much impossible to tell since the characters are immortal and time flows at different speeds in different places in that series. It did however span a very substantial length of time.

    Most of the other series I've read I don't have any of an idea about time spans.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Afghanistan
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemist View Post
    I was reading the Wheel of Time wiki and was surprised when I came across a timeline in which it was revealed that the entire series--all 14 books, from Two Rivers to the grand finale--took about two years. Two years. I found that a bit off-putting - not simply because the books themselves were published over 23 years, but also because of how much occured in those 14 books and much the characters developed, at least in terms of their abilities. I mean, I could see five or six years, but two? It seems a bit off. I think Memory, Sorrow and Thorn was similarly short.

    Anyhow, I'm wondering if people can post the rough time spans of different multi-volume epics? I'm not talking about prologues and ancient history flashbacks, like in Malazan, but the period of time that the protagonist(s) experienced from start to finish of the narrative.

    What others?
    Well.... I will take a stab at Malazan. The main story is similarly pretty short. 6-7 years maybe. My reasoning for arriving at this number is as follows.... I am considering the opening of the series with Ganoes Paran as a boy as a flashback....

    Whiskeyjack: "Heed the lesson there, son.”
    Paran: “What lesson?”
    Whiskeyjack: “Every decision you make can change the world. The best life is the one the gods don’t notice. You want to live free, boy, live quietly.”
    Paran: “I want to be a soldier. A hero.”
    Whiskeyjack: “You’ll grow out of it.”
    Steven Erikson- Gardens of the Moon

    What I am basing the timeframe of the series on is the fact that Hetan's twin daughters (conceived by Kruppe of all people/entities) are still young children at the end of the series. There are probably a few posters at Malazanempire.com that could tell you down to the hour how long the story is. Those folks live, eat and breathe Malazan, but this is my rough estimate for the time frame of the series.

    The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant is pretty difficult to judge time in since time in The Land flows much much faster than our own world's time. I think by the time of the last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant... a couple of decades in our world has turned into a millenia or two in The Land if my memory has served me well....

    Anyway..... I like the subject of this thread and will try a little research on some of the other works that I have enjoyed.

    Cheers all!

    Kempster

  4. #4
    Palinodic Moderator KatG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    In an Ode
    Posts
    12,213
    Wheel of Time takes place over three years, to the best estimations, except the last few books, it's a little uncertain, so four years might be the safest number. The characters age because they are at war for all that time, undergoing various traumas, and some of them have visions of their possible futures, which further ages them into adulthood.

    Most successful epic series have wiki fan sites that will give you timelines, at least approximate ones.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemist View Post
    I was reading the Wheel of Time wiki and was surprised when I came across a timeline in which it was revealed that the entire series--all 14 books, from Two Rivers to the grand finale--took about two years. Two years. I found that a bit off-putting - not simply because the books themselves were published over 23 years, but also because of how much occured in those 14 books and much the characters developed, at least in terms of their abilities. I mean, I could see five or six years, but two? It seems a bit off. I think Memory, Sorrow and Thorn was similarly short.

    Anyhow, I'm wondering if people can post the rough time spans of different multi-volume epics? I'm not talking about prologues and ancient history flashbacks, like in Malazan, but the period of time that the protagonist(s) experienced from start to finish of the narrative.

    What others?
    Fact is, the thicker (with events and characters) the story becomes, the less time can be covered unless the writer inserts gaps. A one-character story can be linear--a thirteen-character story is going to have branches, cross-connections, interactions, backstories, etc. If it's also an epic story (which means more places--more cultures, more languages, more high-stakes situations) it will slow down even more simply because of the words it takes to show each part of that, for even the most elegant and efficient writer.

    My first three books--only one protagonist, covered about five years, with small POV sections (hardly more than brief conversations) from other points of view. The first book made the most ground, over three years. Two "prequel" books, set about 500 years back, each stick to one protagonist and thus cover more time. (The times they cover overlap and the two protagonists, one per book, provide the background for conflicts that show up in both the first trilogy and the current 5 book group.) The new group of books set in the same world, but with expanded co-equal protagonists, is five books, each of which covers less than a year...the first volume, introducing all the main strands that would entwine for the long story arc, covered only a quarter year. A lot happened...it doesn't spend pages detailing every item of clothing, every meal, etc...but so much happened that it took 460+ pages (in the print edition) to cover it. The next volume doesn't quite make a half year. The third (the end of the original contract but quite clearly not capable of engulfing the rest of the story unless reduced to naked outline) was the middle, or hinge, of the story, and that slowed it down--well under half a year. With only a two-book contract to finish the monster, I pushed the fourth book hard to get it to a year and a quarter, and the last also made over a year (with a section in 5 that overlapped 4, because some characters were out of contact for a season.) I think that's right. About four years.

    C.J. Cherryh's Foreigner series (I know; it's SF, not fantasy, but the structure is similar) is now somewhere in the teens of volumes, and how much time is covered in a given volume varies widely. The only "time-covering" book is the one where the POV characters are all on a spaceship on a voyage there and back again that takes two years. Other volumes have covered as little as a month or so. I was recently re-reading all the books in this series that we have, and was astonished to realize (reading them back to back, one volume a day) how little "real time" was covered in most of them. I think altogether it's at least nine years because the heir to the aiji is now almost nine (in the latest one I read) but that's...um...well into the teens of books.

    So it varies. How much detail does the writer give the reader? How deeply are characters realized? How elaborate and nuanced are the cultures shown?

  6. #6
    Thanks E(lizabeth?) Moon, that is very helpful with some factors that I hadn't thought about.

    The reason I asked this question is that as I write and plan my own series (probably 3-4 books), I'm looking at a possible timespan of about 15ish years, which I'm worried is a bit long for epic fantasy. I know that there are any number of ways to approach this, and none are necessarily "wrong," but my concern is if a longer period of time gives the reader a sense of separation from the story, particularly gaps of multiple years between volumes. The first book (which has a complete very rough draft) covers about 7 years, with the first part (approx. 100 pages) describing key points of the protagonist's adolelescence before the main narrative begins when he's 21, when most of the book takes place. I don't think this is all that unusual or problematic. The second book is 3-4 years, and then there's a few-year gap between the second and third/fourth books. So its not a very even progression of time and, in a way, more akin to the structure of the original Star Wars trilogy (if the first movie had included a longer sequence of Luke growing up).

    As an aside, which seems relevant to your explanation, there is one central protagonist with two secondary ones and a bunch of tertiary ones. I'm guessing that about 60% of the first book is the primary protagonist, 30% are the two secondary ones and 10% are spread through the tertiary ones. The point being, it isn't as split as, say, A Song of Ice and Fire.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemist View Post
    Thanks E(lizabeth?) Moon, that is very helpful with some factors that I hadn't thought about.

    The reason I asked this question is that as I write and plan my own series (probably 3-4 books), I'm looking at a possible timespan of about 15ish years, which I'm worried is a bit long for epic fantasy. I know that there are any number of ways to approach this, and none are necessarily "wrong," but my concern is if a longer period of time gives the reader a sense of separation from the story, particularly gaps of multiple years between volumes. The first book (which has a complete very rough draft) covers about 7 years, with the first part (approx. 100 pages) describing key points of the protagonist's adolelescence before the main narrative begins when he's 21, when most of the book takes place. I don't think this is all that unusual or problematic. The second book is 3-4 years, and then there's a few-year gap between the second and third/fourth books. So its not a very even progression of time and, in a way, more akin to the structure of the original Star Wars trilogy (if the first movie had included a longer sequence of Luke growing up).

    As an aside, which seems relevant to your explanation, there is one central protagonist with two secondary ones and a bunch of tertiary ones. I'm guessing that about 60% of the first book is the primary protagonist, 30% are the two secondary ones and 10% are spread through the tertiary ones. The point being, it isn't as split as, say, A Song of Ice and Fire.
    There are both pros and cons to having years of story-time between volumes. Yes--to answer your first question--long gaps of story-time between volumes can distance readers from the story. Readers do not like "gotcha" surprises from writers--and since a reader knows that a lot must have happened in any temporal gap, some readers (at least) will suspect the writer is about to pull a gotcha out of that gap. Readers protect themselves from the effect of this practical joke by withdrawing their commitment to the story and the writer, which means they'll miss a lot of the pleasure you want them to have. In a group of books with one overarching story arc, long gaps are particularly problematic. Though we don't have to adhere to Aristotle's advice that all the action in a play should happen in one day, temporal unity in a story does matter, and gaps can break a story into multiple stories, making it more episodic than unified. (If that happens, consider the possibility of doing related standalones about the same character, as mystery writers often do.)

    How long a gap readers can stand depends on how large the gap is in relation to the rest of the time the story covers. If you have a short story in which everything happens in six hours, a one-hour gap will worry some readers, and two hours will bother most. But a five minute gap, covered with a short phrase ("Five minutes later...") won't be a problem. In a novel, a gap of 24 hours, even several days to a week, isn't alarming to any reader (though it is a temporal transition and needs a marker, like "Next day" or "By the end of the week..." We all experience days and even weeks in which nothing much happens. A month gap, though, needs some explanation, and a year gap between volumes of a series also needs something to show that nothing significant *to the story* happened in that gap. Indicate in the previous book that there might be a gap ("George watched his brother head off for that year in Africa..." and in the following book that George's life between that and this hasn't had anything the story needs ("As Ben's plane arrived at the gate, George knew the first thing Ben would ask him...and he dreaded the look on Ben's face when he said nothing had changed. Nothing at all.") or that you will let their conversation give the reader any needed clues. ("He wondered if the same was true for Ben...")

    In most epic fantasy, something is always going on that relates to the story arc...there aren't any blank places in the story where long gaps can occur, if they're in the same series. (You can certainly have a prequel group, then one or more main groups, and even a "two centuries later" group. But within a group, something's always moving the plot.) In real life, we do have years-long gaps in which nothing much happens in plot terms--or some of us do--but art isn't life, and art stuffs the space with significance. Take another look at those gaps. Is there really no story-stuff in them? Then (since nobody knows but you) consider changing the history and putting something in, or shortening the gaps. C.J. Cherryh has said "Don't draw the map first" (because it may need to change under the story's own logic) and I would say the same thing for the history you're making up...don't make up too much of it first. Maybe your story needs more than three, or four, volumes. Maybe the gaps could be shorter, or something fills them with really good stuff.

  8. #8
    You actually inspired some ideas for some more story in between some of those volumes, so if my series ends up being yet another mega-five-plusser, I'll blame you in one of the acknowledgment pages!

    One of my problems, or challenges really, is that the story I'm working on is one of those rare epics that isn't centered on a war. There are Big Events, and there is warfare, but the focus is more on a series of events culminating over years (a decade+) and the way the characters develop with those events. So a couple gaps of a year or more make sense in that the main characters aren't always in action. For instance, there is a point between the second and third books in which the main character is literally hiding from the world - he is trying to live a simple life, away from all of the troubles of the world, sort of like Clint Eastwood in The Outlaw Josey Wales. But like Josey Wales, he's eventually pulled back into things and can't avoid it any longer.

    I also mentioned the Star Wars trilogy, which as far as I can tell has a gap of a few years between the first and second movie, and then a shorter gap between the second and third. It seems rare that fantasy series takes that approach. I know that George R.R. Martin originally wanted a five year gap after A Storm of Swords, but eventually decided not to (there's more on this on the Wikipedia page of ASoIF).

    So for me the question becomes, if we're talking about a year or two in which "not much happens," do you write that out in the form of a chapter or do you do it via flashback? While there are clearly potential problems with multi-year gaps between novels in a series, it seems more awkward to write a "fast-forward" chapter or two in which years fly by. That is OK at the beginning of a story, I think, but not so much later on.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemist View Post
    You actually inspired some ideas for some more story in between some of those volumes, so if my series ends up being yet another mega-five-plusser, I'll blame you in one of the acknowledgment pages! (snippage)
    Gotta challenge your assumption that most epics are centered on a war. Some are, some aren't. Mine isn't, just to take one instance. Anyway...movies and books aren't the same thing, and movies can visually show a time gap that a book can't. So let's just talk about the books. When nothing much is happening do NOT use the flashback as a way to convey that. Flashbacks are triggered by an emotional hook, and thus must be something (one thing) that happened that seared into the character's memory. Combat vets have flashbacks of an ambush, an IED blowing up their vehicle, being shot, seeing a friend's face blown off. They don't have flashbacks of a week in which nothing much happened and they went on patrol and came back without anything dangerous to notice.

    When you say "nothing much happened" but the character was pulled back into the conflict...did the character change at all? Probably, because from being determined to hide out, he's now willing to come forth. Something made that change...something started it, and something confirmed it (one event might have done both, which is handy, or it might have been a sequence of things that overcame his resistance. Your story--write it and find out which.) Let's say he was hiding for three years. End of one book he does into hiding. Start of next book...it doesn't take a chapter; it can be done in a tidy paragraph, something on the order of "For two years, Hero heard nothing about the world he had left. Gradually he relaxed into his new life, chopping weeds in the garden/turning chair rails/herding goats (whatever skills he brought to the new life), each day more certain that he would never again become embroiled with those people, never again show his face in those places. Then the first rumors of [whatever] reached the remote hamlet/farm/monastery/hermitage/. He refused to listen, but [someone] kept talking about [whatever]. Memories returned [a bunch of nice concrete sensory memories--the smell of this, the taste of that, the sounds, the faces] in spite of his determination. Another traveler brought more tales of [whatever], as [something else] came closer, threatening the fragile peace Hero had found. One of them even mentioned talk of Hero, the name he used to use...his real name. No one here knew he was Hero, no one looked at him oddly, but he felt a cold chill down his back. Maybe he hadn't escaped after all. And the day came when he knew he had to leave...had to return." (And it has to be for a reason that makes sense for that character, and also for most readers. If all he wants to do is cut off his hair and burn it on the grave of a particular relative, then you have to have indicated already that his culture requires that, and he's solidly in that tradition.)

    You can have the process of his change be as lengthy or sudden as you wish; the details of his life in hiding (did he marry? Have children? Become a village elder? Become known as a weirdo?) as ordinary or odd as you wish. In a sudden form it might be just a couple of sentences, even one: "The day Hero heard that [other character important to him in some way in previous book(s)] had died, he knew he had to leave his sanctuary and return to [wherever.] The past three years didn't matter anymore." Done. That's it. You can then refer to something that happened during his hiding period as ordinary backstory. It can be anything that powerful to him--not just someone's death. The fall of a city, the birth of a particular child, a change in the government or a religion. But it has to be something you've shown previously would affect him if it happened. "I'll never go back to my home town as long as X is alive/ as long as so-and-so is mayor/ as long as X and Y are married/ as long as the FBI has me on the most-wanted list/ until that scumbag quits lying about my family/ etc."

  10. #10
    That's very helpful, thanks EM. Your examples were along the lines of what I'm thinking in terms of starting the third book, and as I read them I could see certain elements of the story come into form - so thanks for helping the inspiration along.

    What you say about flashbacks reminds me of some thoughts I've had about memory in general, in real life, and how most (all?) of our memories relate to some kind of important, even cathartic, event in our lives - even if we don't recognize it as such. Or think of the quotes one remembers, how they are in some sense important to one's personal development. In other words, we mainly seem to remember that which has impacted our development in some way (this also implies that each of our memories holds a key to self-understanding). Perhaps this is what you are saying in terms of flashbacks and reverie in general, that it should only be written if it is of strong importance to the story and/or the character's development, or even if it just explains why they are as they are. Perhaps this should go without saying, but I think it bears repeating - at least for me!

    This also holds true for infodumps, I think; every fantasy author, I suspect, knows the temptation to wax on about how awesome their world is and wants the opportunity to share the cool details with the reader. To be honest, this is one of the reasons I grew bored and dropped out of Wheel of Time in book 8--I just got tired of reading about all the details of the various brocades and upholstery in this or that palace.

    By the way, I read and very much enjoyed the DoP back when they came out in the late 80s. Given that its been 25 years, I don't remember a heckuva lot, although am having flashbacks of hot coals in knee joints!

    As a secondary question that is somewhat related, what are your thoughts about when to use flashbacks vs. when to simply start earlier and write out important developmental scenes as they happen? By way of example, as I mentioned earlier, the first of four parts of book one is a kind of extended preliminary sequence that takes the protagonist from about age 14 to 21. There are ten chapters, four of which introduce the two secondary protagonists. Of the six chapters on the main protagonist, the first three cover events over a span of about half a year at age 14-15, then the next three cover events over a year at age 17-18. Then the second part of the book jumps ahead to age 21 and the main narrative begins.

    I've really struggled about whether to just take the entire part one and embed the different chapters as flashbacks later in the text, but I tend not to like long flashbacks as a reader so have kept it somewhat linear. But what I'm worried about is following the general rule to start the story when the action really begins, whereas I have a prologue and then a part one of ten chapters--about 35,000 words--before the main narrative begins. All of that is very important to the plot, and hopefully interesting, but it seems that the general advice from most is to start at or close to when the real action begins, and reveal necessary backstory as you go along.

    On the other hand, I can think of many epic fantasists who have extended preliminary sequences, some being much longer than what I'm talking about. I guess it really depends, and my sense is that it comes down to how important the preliminary sequence is to the unfolding of the story and, of course, how interesting it is.

    What do you think?

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemist View Post
    (snippage) I guess it really depends, and my sense is that it comes down to how important the preliminary sequence is to the unfolding of the story and, of course, how interesting it is.

    What do you think?
    Write the whole thing without worrying about it. Just write it. You can't know until it's done how important something is--whether it's in proportion or not--until you're a lot farther along. You may realize down the road that this chunk isn't necessary, or needs more, but you can't tell early on. And your readers down the line will never know what you took out or added unless you tell them, so don't think it all has to be right in first draft (or second draft...etc.) The Deed doesn't start where I thought it would. Very important (to me when I wrote them) chapters in the middle turned out to be expendable. OTOH, I've had to add things that I'd written so sketchily, in such a rush, that they were more confusing to readers than helpful. (Editors may say of such sketchy bits "Just take that out" but if you know they're important, rewrite to show the editor WHY it's in there. The dog in Vatta's War? An editor wanted to cut the dog. I knew the dog was necessary but didn't yet know why. So I said "Later on, the dog will bite a villain at a critical point." Oh, said the editor, then that's OK. By the time the dog bit a villain, it was clear why the dog needed to be there for another two reasons, as well. So there's self-indulgent stuff, and filler stuff, that an editor is perfectly right to say get rid of, and stuff where you have a strong feeling it has to stay and you may be right. But you have to make it work.)

    Back to your question, though. Write the book(s.) There's no one right way to write a book; for any "idea" there are dozens, if not hundreds, of ways of handling it. You will find your own way, and it will be your way. I will say that you don't get to a good book by trying to avoid mistakes--that's focusing on what not to do, not on what to do. You can fix mistakes once you've got a draft. Write the story you want to read--the story you've never been able to find that you wish someone had written so you wouldn't have to do the work (but they didn't, and this is yoiur story and only you can write it.) It will have mistakes, but don't worry about that now. Write it first. Set it aside for awhile and write something else, then come back to it. If you can fall into it as if someone else had written it--if the story drags you along even though you already KNOW what's coming--you're in business.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Chesterfield, Derbyshire
    Posts
    93
    Quote Originally Posted by E_Moon View Post
    So I said "Later on, the dog will bite a villain at a critical point." Oh, said the editor, then that's OK. By the time the dog bit a villain, it was clear why the dog needed to be there for another two reasons, as well. So there's self-indulgent stuff, and filler stuff, that an editor is perfectly right to say get rid of, and stuff where you have a strong feeling it has to stay and you may be right. But you have to make it work.)
    As I plod round my morning walk, I'll be pondering whether or not that villain would have got bit IF you hadn't needed to produce a cover story to justify the dog being in the tale.

    My present guess is the dog was only really needed for the two other things... and that the bite was a gratuitous bit of cruelty, just to keep the editor sweet.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by jackdaw View Post
    As I plod round my morning walk, I'll be pondering whether or not that villain would have got bit IF you hadn't needed to produce a cover story to justify the dog being in the tale.

    My present guess is the dog was only really needed for the two other things... and that the bite was a gratuitous bit of cruelty, just to keep the editor sweet.
    You expect me to reveal all my secrets out here on the internet? Ha! What if that editor and I ever need to work together again? But a clue: if the dog had not needed to bite the villain, the "bite the bad guy" scene would not have worked (for me or for the editor) and I'd have had to throw that scene out. Dog biting bad guy at a point where only dog biting bad guy could work had to grow out of a lot more than the need to satisfy the editor...and the scene had to be embedded in a realistic sequence of events. (Well, realistic in fictional terms.) "Just write a scene in which dog bites bad guy" is too simple. Can be done, can be stuck into a story like a single raisin in a scrambled egg, but it will show it didn't belong there. And as I said, at the moment the editor challenged the dog being in the books at all, I did not know what the dog was really needed for--several of the necessary other bits hadn't shown up yet. We had dirty, scared puppy found in a trashcan causing a particular legal problem with law enforcement and a double distraction for a main character. A temporary problem, which the editor thought could be easily replaced by something else. Why a puppy, editor wanted to know.

    If I had not had the strong feeling that this puppy's whining in the trash can had a reason other than having recently seen Shakespeare in Love, in which an older theater person informs the young Shakespeare that a dog on stage is always a good idea, the editor could have been right. Lots of ideas come to me in the process of writing a group of books and at least a quarter of them turn out to be duds, except that they ignite other ideas, some of which aren't. So I'll try them, see what works, and dump the ones that don't have resonance with everything else. The dog might have been that kind of "throw it at the wall and see if it sticks" except for the gut feeling that it was more than that. Editors don't really read writers' entrails (though it sometimes seems like it!) so gut feelings are the writer's to sort out. It can't be just affection for an idea or a paragraph...we all fall in love with some parts of our own writing when anyone else can see that part is crap. Hence the great usefulness of beta readers. No, I"m sorry, that exquisitely written chapter about a journey in the snow is *not* a mastepiece of metaphor, but a dull, boring, nothing-really-happens roadblock in the book's trajectory. No (as another editor told me once), readers will not be fascinated to find out how much you know about fly-fishing. I could cut the entire chapter of the journey, cut down the fly-fishing episode (which had multiple purposes in the plot) so it covered only those things, etc. Loving your own work is not a gut feeling, it's up there in the brain, connecting to the endorphin release system. The real gut feeling is different, and nearly always right, but you still have to make it work in context.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Chesterfield, Derbyshire
    Posts
    93
    Quote Originally Posted by E_Moon View Post
    Y
    If I had not had the strong feeling that this puppy's whining in the trash can had a reason other than having recently seen Shakespeare in Love, in which an older theater person informs the young Shakespeare that a dog on stage is always a good idea
    Back from plodding round usual Friday walk, which I'm going to count as double distance as it was so chuffing hot.

    Anyway, this geezer in Shakespeare in Love may well have been right... when I first started reading fiction happy to read any story featuring dogs... and science fiction with a dog would have been pure heaven.

    So purely for nostalgia reasons have whacked "Trading in Danger" onto Kindle. (No...I'm kidding about that "purely" part...having read a book or three of your other stuff, confident I'll enjoy the read.)

  15. #15
    Thanks again, E Moon. The old saying "write what you want to read" has been my guiding principle, and will continue to be my guiding principle. It may never lead to a large readership, but it will keep the joy of writing alive.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •