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  1. #1

    H. Beam Pipers Terro-Human Future History series

    Hi guy's and gal's. I just read Little Fuzzy on my new Kindle and was interested in reading more of Pipers Future history series. I'm a little confused about which order to read them in and what books are actually part of the series though. I've gathered that Uller Uprising and then Four-Day Planet is where I should start but what other books are part of the series and what order should they be read in?

    Thanks.

    Btw, what do people think about Little Fuzzy? I found it to be very sweet, and the whole government vs corporation aspect to be fascinating. It's very sad that a man who could write such adorable and lovable characters could find his life ending in such tragic circumstances.

  2. #2
    Live Long & Suffer psikeyhackr's Avatar
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    The stories are mostly very independent of each other. I don't think the sequence you read them matters that much.

    I think Uller Uprising and The Cosmic Computer are about the best.

    http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p#a8301

    psik
    Last edited by psikeyhackr; October 27th, 2011 at 12:12 PM.

  3. #3
    Thanks for the reply PsiKy. I actually just found a site with a chronologically ordered list of all the stories in the series. I figured they could be read in any order but my (probably imagined) OCD won't allow it.

    The list can be found here: http://www.zarthani.net/future_history_bibliography.htm

  4. #4
    I read Little Fuzzy and John Scalzi's adaptation of that same story called Fuzzy Nation, and I really think you should read Fuzzy Nation. There's no comparison as far as plotting, characters, dialogue and just general polish.

  5. #5
    Cheers Pvt. I'm sure I'll read it in time, I really like them Fuzzy buggers

  6. #6
    Even the fuzzies are portrayed much better. Once I learned that Scalzi's story was actually an adaptation I couldn't help but wonder why an author would write an adaptation of someone else's work. After having read both books I now know why.

  7. #7
    Live Long & Suffer psikeyhackr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pvt View Post
    Even the fuzzies are portrayed much better. Once I learned that Scalzi's story was actually an adaptation I couldn't help but wonder why an author would write an adaptation of someone else's work. After having read both books I now know why.
    I haven't read Scalzi's version yet but I think Piper's version is "cute" science fiction, quite good for young kids. Teenagers and older people may not be impressed with it.

    That is something I don't see mentioned much on this site. What science fiction is "GOOD" at what age? It is as though it is all supposed to be evaluated to some standard of maybe a 30 year old.

    psik

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by psikeyhackr View Post
    I haven't read Scalzi's version yet but I think Piper's version is "cute" science fiction, quite good for young kids. Teenagers and older people may not be impressed with it.

    That is something I don't see mentioned much on this site. What science fiction is "GOOD" at what age? It is as though it is all supposed to be evaluated to some standard of maybe a 30 year old.

    psik
    Just read Fuzzy Nation and you'll know what I'm talking about.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by psikeyhackr View Post
    I haven't read Scalzi's version yet but I think Piper's version is "cute" science fiction, quite good for young kids. Teenagers and older people may not be impressed with it.

    That is something I don't see mentioned much on this site. What science fiction is "GOOD" at what age? It is as though it is all supposed to be evaluated to some standard of maybe a 30 year old.

    psik
    I'm 23 and still found the first Fuzzy book to be really well written regardless of whether or not it's YA, especially in regards to how the Fuzzy's were portrayed and their relationship with Jack. When I thought about the date in which it was written I was even more impressed, well before the likes of Gremlins, E.T or Ewoks.

    That all said I don't mind reading what others may condescendingly call "kids books". I enjoyed the Harry Potter books, am a fan of Brian Jacques Redwall series and I'm currently reading the Animorphs books that I used to love when I was younger.

    My appreciation of Little Fuzzy may also stem from the fact that I pictured Jack Holloway as Clint Eastwood

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