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  1. #1
    In need of a night light The Dark Truth's Avatar
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    Western Genre or Western historical novels

    Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry is one of my favorites and I have read several of his other novels set in the Old West; however, I have not read any other authors in this genre or setting. I am looking for some suggestions on good western novels for future reading.

  2. #2
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    I like historicals set in the American West too. One of my favorites is Heart of the Country by Greg Matthews.

    There's the classic Shane by Jack Schaefer (sp?), which is a good read as well as a rockin' movie.

    Tie My Bones to Her Back by Robert F. Jones is good, if a bit raw.

    If you like a supernatural element, The Flight of Michael McBride by Midori Snyder is good.

    I liked The Missing by Thomas Eidson -- it was a movie with Tommy Lee Jones.

    Someone recommended Oakley Hall's western books, but I tried Outlaw and wasn't impressed.

    If you don't mind a bit of romance, Wanderers Eastward, Wanderers West by Kathleen Windsor is sort of a western Gone With the Wind.

    And if you don't mind a lot of romance, try Hermana Sam by Paul King. I think it was the first (definitely the best) of the sub-genre of romance that paired a white woman with an Indian warrior. Hot stuff.

    A classic is Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather. For years, I thought it was a murder mystery. What an odd title for a book about the frontier Southwest. It's excellent.

    I'll think of some more after I take a look at my shelves. I love westerns.

  3. #3
    Lord of the Wild Hunt Mithfânion's Avatar
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    So wild a dream and it's sequels by Win Blevins.

    Has anyone read AB Guthrie's western/mountain man books, starting with The Big Sky? They seem to be considered great classics.

  4. #4
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    I've read Guthrie but it's been years, and I don't recall whether I liked them or not.

    Win Blevins, huh? I'll check him out.

  5. #5
    Gloriam Imperator kged's Avatar
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    Cormac McCarthy's "Blood Meridian" - a fine, fine book, by a major writer, but strong stuff. Movies like "Unforgiven" are supposed to strip the gloss away from the old West - this book makes them look like Roy Rogers...

  6. #6
    Registered User Raule's Avatar
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    I have never read a Louis L'Amour novel, but that is the name that springs to mind when I think about Westerns. I've thought about trying some of his books, though. Anyone have any recommendations?

    I guess there is always James Michener's Centennial and any of Zane Grey's books (I think these were considered western pulp fiction, but haven't read them). John Jakes has written about the American Western frontier, too. Wallace Stegner's Pulitizer Prize winning Angle of Repose has been recommended to me a few times, though I haven't read it.

    For a bit of cowboy/western humor, try Baxter Black (this guy makes me laugh!).

  7. #7
    Some excellent historical westerns : "The Travels Of Jamie McPheeters" by Robert Lewis Taylor , a pulitzer prize winner , " Little Big Man" and its sequel , "The Return Of Little Big Man" by Thomas Berger, "The Snowblind Moon" by John Byrne Cooke , "Deadwood" by Pete Dexter , "The Court Martial Of George Armstrong Custer" by Douglas c. Jones and the novels of A. B. Guthrie , "Big Sky" , "The Way West" , "Fair Land,Fair Land" , "These Thousand Hills" , "Arfive" , and "The Last Valley".

  8. #8
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    Thumbs up What About True Westerns?

    What about westerns that are true to life? Have you ever read "It Never Rains in Gold Gap?" It is a series of stories of the adventures of a young cowboy in Arizona in the early forties when they still had cattle drives to the railroad, ate out of chuck wagons, had no radios or television and ate by coal oil lamps.
    This book has over forty short stories and can be bought over the net.
    It has sold all over the US and Europe and there is talk it may be made into a movie. It isn't a shoot 'em up or dime store novel, but a true story of what it was like when cowboys worked from from sun-up to past sundown and depicts every adventure a young teen-age cowboy can encounter on an old style ranch that had not changed since the 1880's.

  9. #9
    My dad had a Louis L'Amour collection when I was a kid so I read them and began buying them on my own too. Now whenever I'm on a roadtrip especially in drier country, I get the urge and go buy a new one. South Dakota -- I'm not interested in that ole sci fi book I brought, I want a L'Amour book. Desert country, I can just picture the Sackets riding up on that skyline. (an aside I must remember to pack one for my upcoming trip).

    I'm not sure they would keep me engaged if I started reading them now, but given the long time I've been reading them, they just sort of resonate with me. I do however usually skip through the inevitable long fistfight scene. BUt all in all, they're usually just classic shitstompers where the white hats always win.

    Try Tucker, any of the Sackets although some of these will take place back East (or at least start there), or SHalako.
    Last edited by Libo; May 5th, 2007 at 11:38 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by kged View Post
    Cormac McCarthy's "Blood Meridian" - a fine, fine book, by a major writer, but strong stuff. Movies like "Unforgiven" are supposed to strip the gloss away from the old West - this book makes them look like Roy Rogers...
    I finished this book last night, and while the style took me a little while to get used to, once I adjusted it really grabbed me. The sheer brutality of some of the earlier scenes distracted me from the monster of The Judge until he crept more and more into the narrative and I felt I was reading a horror novel.
    For me it wasn't as powerful as The Road, but was still a very good read.

  11. #11
    Rogue Warrior
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    I used to love the Floating Outfit series by JT Edson when I was a teenager.
    This was my favorite artwork too.
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/e/...half-breed.htm

  12. #12
    It never entered my mind algernoninc's Avatar
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    back in my Eastern Europe childhood Karl May was all the rage and i used to come back to the adventures of Winnetou and Old Surehand every year for a re-read. I'm not sure the author visited the real wild west.
    This year I read Valdez is Coming by Elmore Leonard, and i think i will try some more of his western novels for leisure reading.

  13. #13
    I read a book a long time ago whose author escapes me, but it was called North to Abilene, all about a cattle drive in the old days...very realistic and great characters.

  14. #14
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    Thumbs up Other Suggestions

    Here are some great Westerns Novels.
    Site : http://myfivekids.hubpages.com/hub/best-western-books

  15. #15
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    Stephen King's Dark Tower series describes itself as Wester, Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Epic. Can't complain about that.

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