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  1. #46
    It never entered my mind algernoninc's Avatar
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    A Son of the Circus by John Irving. I've just started it, but I love its sense of humor and the cross cultural references between Canada and India.
    The Prisoner of Heaven was a bit od a dssapointment, well written but too short and unfocused.

  2. #47
    I read Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn last week and just started Dark Places. A friend gave me a great recommendation for Gone Girl, so I've decided to start at the begining and move my way towards that. Sharp Objects was very good and I really like where we're going with Dark Places so far.

  3. #48
    and I like to party. Seak's Avatar
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    Finished Catch-22, and while enjoyable, even hilarious at times, I couldn't wait to be done. I think it would have been a million times better at just half the length.

  4. #49
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    Elizabeth Street by Laurie Fabiano -- Italian immigrants in NYC in the early 1900's. It feels more lived than researched -- good job!

    Recently finished Isaac's Army by Matthew Brzezinski, an account of the Warsaw Uprising. Was interested enough to purchase a couple of DVD's, one documentary (very good) and another, Uprising, which is disappointing as a movie but worth it for the interviews with some of the people involved in the actual event, including three survivors from the book.

  5. #50
    Vanaeph Westsiyeed's Avatar
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    Read the latest spy thriller by Daniel Silva, The Fallen Angel - he's always a reliable author to tell a good story surrounding the main character, Gabriel Allon. This one's about global high-end art theft and is set in the Vatican, Austria and Israel.

    I think though it's getting to the stage where all his books are blending in and are too similar to previous ones - maybe he should try to do something different. Otherwise a good book.

  6. #51
    and I like to party. Seak's Avatar
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    Reading Vince Flynn's Pursuit of Honor (Mitch Rapp book) and actually really enjoying it. I usually have a hard time with anything that doesn't involve magic or at least humor in some way, but this has me somewhat taken, which is highly surprising. Rapp is kind of like Jack Bauer so that definitely helps.

  7. #52
    Finally finished Saturday by Ian McEwan - 'finally' becasue i started a couple of years ago, for unknown reasons did not finish it and just discovered this fact. Quickly remedied, because it is a compact book, covering essentially one day in the life of neurosurgeon Henry Perowne. Very well written, thought provoking (especially regarding how we, seemingly civilised people, interact with each other - and what drives us to do what we do). Well composed, beautiful sentences and very insightful. Very much enjoyed it.

    Cheers, Sfinx.

  8. #53
    Next to Arch Stanton ezchaos's Avatar
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    Just finished Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel. It told the story of Henry the VIII's attempt at divorcing Catherine of Aragorn so he could then marry Anne Boleyn. It's told from the pov of Thomas Cromwell, an up and coming advisor to the king. The writing style takes a bit of getting used to, but I didn't have any issues after the first few pages. I knew little of this time period, so it was quite a learning experience. If you enjoy court intrigue, this is a must-read. Highly recommended.

  9. #54
    Boba Fett Lives Daddy Darth's Avatar
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    Taking a quick break from The Wise Man's Fear to read an early X-mas present - The Sisters Brothers by Patrick DeWitt a western of all things. I am only about 70 pgs in but it is filled with real wit, humour and smarts. Great crisp writing and a very appealing protagonist. Its good stuff.

  10. #55
    The Crime at Black Dudley & Mystery Mile by Margery Allingham

    These are the first of Allingham's novels with Albert Campion. In the first, he's a secondary character, but his appeal led her American publishers to push her for more and so he became the main character in later novels. Like so many English mysteries written in the 1920s and 1930s, these are written as though they are light-hearted romps yet feature not-so-light-hearted crimes. Allingham somehow manages to avoid ridiculousness while keeping the lightness of her tone, and portraying criminals who seem dangerous, and even producing some comic scenes that play off the villains' gravity.

    I understand that this is a series in which the main character does grow older and become more mature, so I may read more of them in the future. These two were certainly entertaining enough.


    Randy M.
    Last edited by Randy M.; December 28th, 2012 at 03:55 PM.

  11. #56
    Boba Fett Lives Daddy Darth's Avatar
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    Finished The Sisters Brothers! What a great read - possibly the best of the year. Amazing writing and one hell of a story.

  12. #57
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddy Darth View Post
    Finished The Sisters Brothers! What a great read - possibly the best of the year. Amazing writing and one hell of a story.
    I'm gonna get this one. I really liked the sample -- glad to hear your positive opinion.

    A Possible Life by Sebastian Faulks, who wrote the hugely popular Birdsong. This is a collection of five loosely-connected novellas describing of the lives of five disparate people and how small and large choices affected their lives.

    San Miguel by T.C. Boyle. Two families, one in the 1880's and one in the 1930's, make a life on a small island off the coast of California. There's no plot, so readers looking for a beginning-middle-end kind of story might be disappointed. I'm happy just living with people, experiencing other lives.

    Star of the Sea and Redemption Falls by Joseph O'Connor. These two books will form a trilogy -- the third book isn't written yet. Star of the Sea is set on a ship in 1847, traveling from Ireland to America. The story is "written" by a passenger, includes letters, journal entries, news articles, and has several different points of view. Each chapter is a day in the 26-day journey, with flashbacks showing how the characters ended up on the ship. The focus is the Famine, and if you're averse to sordid and depressing details, you won't like this book.

    I've read and enjoyed O'Connor's other novel, Ghost Light, his take on an affair of a woman and an Irish playwright, based on real people.

    This guy can write.

  13. #58
    Vanaeph Westsiyeed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddy Darth View Post
    Finished The Sisters Brothers! What a great read - possibly the best of the year. Amazing writing and one hell of a story.
    Agreed! Just finished this last night. An excellent story with dark humour and some gruesome action thrown in, and it had quite a heartfelt ending. I really enjoyed this; will have to check out the author's other novel.

  14. #59
    A chuffing heffalump Chuffalump's Avatar
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    Recently read Ben Goldacre's new book Bad Pharma. Not as interesting as his previous Bad Science but still a massive eye opener.

  15. #60
    It never entered my mind algernoninc's Avatar
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    read Life of Pi in anticipation of going to the movies. Loved it, much easier to read than expected (I have a strange reticence in picking Booker Prize winners, thinking they would be tormened, overwritten, slow paced, etc) . Martel is quite the storyteller, and I always liked survival at sea adventures. Plus, I'm with Pi Patel in many of his views on religion and zoo keeping.

    Also finisged an excellent crime story set in Argentina : The Secret In Their Eyes by Eduardo Sacherri.

    I'm reading now another little book that lost no time in winning me over : I Served The King of England by Bohumir Hrabal. Think Antoine Doisnel from Les Quatrecent Coups meets Fielding's Tom Jones, all set in classy hotels and restaurants in the Chech Republic.

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