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  1. #1
    Closet Romantic Forrest's Avatar
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    Post The Grammar Query Thread!

    is it:

    "The entire situation was like a puzzle WHOSE pieces floated indistinctly in a haze of questions"

    or


    "The entire situation was like a puzzle WHO'S pieces floated indistinctly in a haze of questions"

    I can't believe I'm stuck on that! lol

  2. #2
    Death Dealer Artistic Wizard's Avatar
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    You would use the word WHOSE. This is the possessive case of who or which used as an adjective........WHO'S is a contradiction of who is or of who has.......I hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Sacorian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artistic Wizard View Post
    You would use the word WHOSE. This is the possessive case of who or which used as an adjective........WHO'S is a contradictionof who is or of who has.......I hope this helps.
    Contraction of who is perhaps? lol

  4. #4
    Closet Romantic Forrest's Avatar
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    ah, yes. Thank you kindly.

  5. #5
    sf-icionado / horr-orator Andrew Leon Hudson's Avatar
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    Just to let you know, Bart, but you've missed your social security number off there.

  6. #6
    Hlúgiligr! Moderator Kirby's Avatar
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    A"grammar" forum?

    For those really tricky little ones like "(sentence)" - do I use 'practise' or 'practice'?

    Or Tblues /Tblue's /Tblues'

    I know there are varying levels of grammar ability around, and what is basic to one is not so to another.
    I'm not that bad at English, but the two above are the sorts of things I often get caught by!

    Maybe a grammar forum with a FAQ? (updated whenever something useful comes up?)

    I'm not advocating it as a "Here's my paragraph, check my spelling" place (dictionaries and spell checkers are for that), but rather a forum for those who actively seek to get things right.

    Anyway - just thought it might be a useful thing?

    i before e except after c, and all that!

  7. #7
    Olo Bumbleroot of Haysend someguy's Avatar
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    Not a bad idea.

    If it was in the writing forum, it would quickly get overrun, so a separate forum makes sense....

    Maybe, when the grammar issue in question was resolved, the thread would be closed. The Subject lines of the thread would have to be very descriptive to avoid unneccessary duplication.

    The hard-headed answer would be that writers should deal with that on their own, but I am not that hard-headed.

    I guess the key thing would be how much work was involved in mods renaming the threads, closing them once completed, and then making sure that people dont post the same subject.

    Like I said, not a bad idea at all, just a question of how much admin work is invovled for the mods...

  8. #8
    Keeping The Equilibrium Erebus's Avatar
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    There's no reason why this can't be done in this very thread, in the Writing section. There's no need to keep starting new ones for each query. So, if you have any grammar queries, bring them on and discuss them here. Oh, and in keeping with the writing theme, this thread is now a sticky in the Writing section.

    To start it off, Forrest's very good query has been merged here as well.

  9. #9
    Edited for submission Holbrook's Avatar
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    Grammar, the bane of my life.

    I think this idea is great. Grammar has always been my weakness. I am relearning skills I let slip nearly thirty years ago. (you don't need much grammar when you crunch numbers all day.) I kept enough to draft notes and lettes for typists and left the rest up to them...

    Grammar can be a tool to alter the tone of a piece.

    This is a skill I want to develop to the full if a can...

  10. #10
    Hlúgiligr! Moderator Kirby's Avatar
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    Apostrophe, "s"

    Well, if someone could explain the whys and wherefores of:
    Tblues/Tblue's/Tblues' apostrophe and "s", I'd appreciate it!

    I know about the "Tblue is" contraction (Tblue's), but say I'm talking about something of mine - Tblue's cat? Is that right?

    And how would the other situations of "apostrophe S" apply?
    Thanks

  11. #11
    Leisure time optimizer Moderator Nimea's Avatar
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    Tblue's cat is right.

    Tblues would be plural.

    And if you would be called Tblues not Tblue, than it would be Tblues' cat. Also, if all the Tblues in the world have one cat it would be Tblues' cat as well.

    One more example: Julia's cat, but Jules' cat.

    Sorry that I can't explain it, hope you understand it anyway.

  12. #12
    Wizard Errant
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nimea View Post
    Tblue's cat is right.

    Tblues would be plural.

    And if you would be called Tblues not Tblue, than it would be Tblues' cat. Also, if all the Tblues in the world have one cat it would be Tblues' cat as well.

    One more example: Julia's cat, but Jules' cat.

    Sorry that I can't explain it, hope you understand it anyway.
    Strunk and White's The Elements of Style states you should always use an 's no matter the ending of the word. Jules's cat.

  13. #13
    Master Obfuscator Dawnstorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K_Spires View Post
    Strunk and White's The Elements of Style states you should always use an 's no matter the ending of the word. Jules's cat.
    They do mention exceptions (here), but you're right: they would have us write, "Jules's cat". If you like that better, use it. But what Nimea says isn't wrong (I for one prefer that usage).

    Strunk and White aren't especially known for their tolerance for usage other than their own. Personally, I wish Strunk's booklet had faded into obscurity instead of being picked up by White, edited and published. People quote it to justify a lot of nonsense corrections.

  14. #14
    Wizard Errant
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dawnstorm View Post
    They do mention exceptions (here), but you're right: they would have us write, "Jules's cat". If you like that better, use it. But what Nimea says isn't wrong (I for one prefer that usage).

    Strunk and White aren't especially known for their tolerance for usage other than their own. Personally, I wish Strunk's booklet had faded into obscurity instead of being picked up by White, edited and published. People quote it to justify a lot of nonsense corrections.
    It's a style guide, just like any other. Honestly, unless someone points out an error, the error isn't there. If people read over the "error" without stopping, it isn't much of an error.

    People are going to understand the possessive meaning of Jules' and Jules's, either way. I like the Strunk and White guide myself. I think it is a safe, non superflouse way of writing. I can't claim to adhere to it one hundred percent. But I think it is a good place to start.

    But people can pull from many grammatical sources to justify corrections that they deem important. Most grammar text books are harder to follow than Strunk and White's guide. I highly recommend it.

  15. #15
    This is driving me nuts...no one I ask knows. Sorry if it's been posted; I don't have time to read all those.

    Would I say "All (noun)s are not (adjective)" or "Not all (noun)s are (adj.)"?
    It seems to me that, although I see the first used a lot, the second would make more sense. The first seems to imply that because ALL (noun)s are (adj) no (noun)s are (adj)'s opposite. E.G.:
    "All Vietnamese are not bad" or
    "Not all Vietnamese are bad"?

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