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  1. #181
    infomaniac Expendable's Avatar
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    Humans are social beings and want to be together, to be accepted.

    What makes people weird? An odd quirk of personality? A different experience? Being free-spirited? An accident of birth or just an accident?

    Usually all it takes is to be different.

  2. #182
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    Jeez Louise...I'm a freak...by your definition...Hey...I don't seem to have a problem with that!! I guess it goes with the territory. Oh well...onward and upward...

  3. #183
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    Question on proper dialog format.

    I have a question about writing dialog. Does the spoken word enclosed in quotations go on the same line as the rest of the sentence or do you begin a new line with it. For example:

    Bob looked at the $7000 television set with undisguised longing; it was exactly what he had been looking for, but slightly overpriced.
    (New line) "Hey," he said to the salesmen. "Any way I can get a deal on this set?"

    OR

    Bob looked at the $7000 television set with undisguised longing; it was exactly what he had been looking for, but slightly overpriced. (Same line) "Hey," he said to the salesmen. "Any way I can get a deal on this set?"

    Thanks in advance for your help.
    Last edited by Crieum; November 22nd, 2004 at 02:51 PM.

  4. #184
    I think you can go either way and be OK.

  5. #185
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    Okay, please be patient...I've mislaid my glasses, so I'm depending on my typing skills more than usual.
    Either way is permissible when writing dialog. It is a matter of individual style. I, myself, use a mixture of both ways, depending on the situation, to prevent repetitiveness.
    Hope this helps..

  6. #186
    I AM too a mod! Moderator Rocket Sheep's Avatar
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    If someone other than Bob had spoken it would have to be a new line. If the narration in front of the dialogue did not relate specifically to the dialogue it would have to be on a new line. If the narration mentioned someone else as well as Bob it would have to go on a new line.

    The main problem with that excerpt is that $7000 isn't 'slightly' overpriced at all. It's horrendously overpriced! You could buy a decent projector and screen for that price!

  7. #187
    enslaved to my writing Abby's Avatar
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    I ditto Rocket Sheep's advice. The only times I put dialogue in an action/exposition paragraph is when the subject of that paragraph is the speaker.

    For instance:
    Tija could not help but glance around to make certain no slaves had woken up. "There is no need to disturb your mistress. This probably won’t take long."
    Tija is the speaker. If anyone else was speaking--or if the scene has a lot of people in it, where the reader might get confused as to who's speaking--I'd put the dialogue in its own paragraph.

  8. #188

    Smile

    hi all!

    this is my first posting and i hope everyone is fine!

    i hope to be able to improve on my writing skills and therefore the basics of the grammatical know-how is important.

    the grammar book i am reading is not clear on this therefore i'd be grateful if any of you can give me a tip or two.

    the inverted order:

    if the verb (usually an aux. verb) in the predicate and the subject are changed in position, the sentence is in the inverted order.

    the inverted answer with "neither/nor" is to agree in the negative. respond to each of the sentences with the given word (s). be sure to invert the answer with 'neither/nor'.

    1. the doors weren't open. (windows)

    ans:

    2. the children weren't tired at all. (the parents)

    ans:


    explain the answers.

    thank you.

  9. #189
    Master Obfuscator Dawnstorm's Avatar
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    1. The doors weren't open. - Neither (Nor) were the windows.

    2. The children weren't tired at all. - Neither (Nor) were the parents.

    ***

    All that means is that "Neither/nor"-clauses (of the above kind) have an unusual word order in that the predicate comes before the subject.

    Compare:

    The doors weren't open. The window wasn't, either.

    Normal word order, here.

  10. #190
    dawnstorm, thank you so much for your reply.

    the author of this book insists that the answers for the two questions are:

    1. the doors weren't open. (the windows)

    ans: neither were the windows.

    2. the Children weren't tired at all. (the parents)

    ans: nor were the parents.

    pardon me.

    we all know that the normal word order of an english sentence is 'subject+predicate' - natural order.

    if the verb (usually an aux. verb) in the predicate and the subject are changed in position, the sentence is in the inverted order.

    however, it wasn't clearly explained as of why and how in what given situations (clause, tense) warrant the use of neither, nor in the inverted order.

    thank you.

  11. #191
    Ok, I got a couple of simple questions but somehow confused me:

    What is the difference between the two sentences?

    "Her fame had also alienated her from her friends, who were retracted away from her..."

    "Her fame had also alienated her from her friends, who retracted away from her..."

    Also:

    "Her fame had also alienated her from her friends."

    "Her fame also alienated her from her friends."

  12. #192
    Yobmod Yobmod's Avatar
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    A question / bitch about a microsoft grammar rule.

    According to MS:

    If you are using a noun that cannot be counted or divided such as ''oil,'' "happiness," and "furniture," it is incorrect to modify that noun with "a," "each," "every," or "either."



    But oil is not an uncountable noun!: I have two oils, a red oil and a yellow oil.

    Surely that isn't wrong? How else am i supposed to say 'the reaction produced a colourless syrup'?

  13. #193
    Yobmod Yobmod's Avatar
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    Ok, I got a couple of simple questions but somehow confused me:
    What is the difference between the two sentences?

    "Her fame had also alienated her from her friends, who were retracted away from her..."

    "Her fame had also alienated her from her friends, who retracted away from her..."
    The first 2 are different because to retract means 'to pull away from'. So:

    Her friends were retracted = her friends were pulled away (by an outside influence).
    Her friends retracted = her friends pulled away.

    The first reads very strangely tho (grappling hooks are usually retracted, not people ), and I wouldn't use it. Try "withdrawn/isolated/kept away from her" instead? or better yet, use the second sentence, depending on what you want to convey.

    "Her fame had also alienated her from her friends."

    "Her fame also alienated her from her friends."
    I think the only difference here is the tense:

    (Past) Her fame had also alienated her = it alienated her in the past (and maybe still does)
    (Present) Her fame also alienated her = her fame is alienating her currently.
    Last edited by Yobmod; January 10th, 2006 at 06:12 AM.

  14. #194
    Yobmod Yobmod's Avatar
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    D'oh, MS is being a 'tard again. Its explanations are useless

    how is this wrong?

    , but the explosion occurs four metres away from the group.
    MS say the verb is wrong: "it is incorrect to put a direct object directly after the verb. Consider changing the verb or adding a preposition directly after the marked verb."


    Also, what is the correct use of "a" or "an" when proceeding numbers or letters?

    Eg: in a 1:2 ratio OR in an 1:2 ratio
    Do you use "an" before "one" anyway? (as it sounds like won).

    And: use of a STI unit OR use of an STI unit
    (as the abreviation starts with an S, but is pronounced ess-tee-eye.)
    Last edited by Yobmod; January 10th, 2006 at 07:19 AM.

  15. #195
    Master Obfuscator Dawnstorm's Avatar
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    1.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yobmod
    If you are using a noun that cannot be counted or divided such as ''oil,'' "happiness," and "furniture," it is incorrect to modify that noun with "a," "each," "every," or "either."
    The rule is true. But oil is an uncountable word only if you refer to a "specific mass of oil"; not if you're referring to different kinds of "oils".

    So you can certainly say, "an oil of such texture", "a red oil", if your referring to type.

    ***

    2.
    MS say the verb is wrong: "it is incorrect to put a direct object directly after the verb. Consider changing the verb or adding a preposition directly after the marked verb."
    I don't see anything wrong there, either.

    Especially, since "occur" is intransitive and does not have a direct object. "Four feet away" is not a direct object.

    *Puzzled*

    3.
    Also, what is the correct use of "a" or "an" when proceeding numbers or letters?

    Eg: in a 1:2 ratio OR in an 1:2 ratio
    Do you use "an" before "one" anyway? (as it sounds like won).

    And: use of a STI unit OR use of an STI unit
    (as the abreviation starts with an S, but is pronounced ess-tee-eye.)
    Depends on pronuncian:

    a 1:2 ratio (because of the "w" sound you mention)
    but:
    an 8:9 ratio.

    Same goes for abbreviations/acronyms:

    For example, I've seen both "An FAQ" and "A FAQ". I'd read the former "an eff aye cue", the latter "a fack". (When in doubt consult a dictionary.)

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