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  1. #166
    Riyria Revelations Author sullivan_riyria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zsinj View Post
    But never the less I'm enjoying the "Dead Zone" so far.
    I loved the premise of the Dead Zone - I think King is exceptional with "what if" scenarios. If I had one complaint it is that his endings tend to be disappointing (The Stand) but he does a great job with premises and characters.

  2. #167
    Vanaeph Westsiyeed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy M. View Post
    and next up will Kiernan's new novel, The Drowning Girl.

    Randy M.
    I've read some good reviews of The Drowning Girl - will be interested in what you think.

  3. #168
    Felis silvestris Hellions's Avatar
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    I finished Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman. I was initially a bit reluctant to plunge into this novel seeing all the comparisons to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, which for me tends to evoke randomness, silliness and chaotic plots. Neverwhere was all these things of course but Gaiman infused his London Below society with life and populated it with several memorable characters. Good plot, fine writing and an unusual main protagonist (just a random guy).

  4. #169
    Felis silvestris Hellions's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Contrarius View Post
    I read all three books of The Last Herald-Mage trilogy (by Lackey) over the last few days. I really liked parts of them, but other parts made me want to smack Lackey upside the head a few times. OTOH, these should be pretty perfect for a young teenage girl.
    I don't know, I would argue that a certain violent scene in the final book could be shocking to teenagers and would disqualify it for recommendation.


    Quote Originally Posted by Randy M. View Post
    This is a possible read for me over the summer. For what it's worth, Brite's story collection, Wormwood, was one of my favorite reads in the '90s. It has a fair amount of her early, raw work which made it fascinating to watch the progression to her later, more fully realized stories, like "Calcutta, Lord of Nerves" and "His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood."

    Right now I'm reading Kiernan's story collection, To Charles Fort, with Love, which is wonderful, weird reading, and next up will Kiernan's new novel, The Drowning Girl.


    Randy M.
    Thank you for your thoughts on Wormwood. I've got it in my sights and have just bought Drawing Blood.

    Concerning Kiernan, I'm a bit at a loss. I truly loved her writing in Silk but the plot fell completely flat and meandered into some sort of frustrating nonsensical "dreamscape". I've been reluctant to try some of her other stuff because of it and the sequel sits unread on my shelves. Are all her books in a similar vein?

  5. #170
    Quote Originally Posted by Hellions View Post
    [...]Thank you for your thoughts on Wormwood. I've got it in my sights and have just bought Drawing Blood.

    Concerning Kiernan, I'm a bit at a loss. I truly loved her writing in Silk but the plot fell completely flat and meandered into some sort of frustrating nonsensical "dreamscape". I've been reluctant to try some of her other stuff because of it and the sequel sits unread on my shelves. Are all her books in a similar vein?
    I haven't read her early novels, except for Threshold, and her last novel before The Drowning Girl, The Red Tree which was one of my favorite reads in 2009. Note, though, that Silk was her first novel, and first novels can be rocky.

    When I started To Charles Fort, With Love, it was after reading a couple of other really fine short story collections. Both of those writers, though, were mostly traditional in the way they structured their stories, so Kiernan's stories demanded that I adjust some. Kiernan doesn't seem all that concerned with plot. It's there, and in the stories I've read so far it has its importance, but several of the stories end with the implication of actions important to plot taking place after the end of the story. What Kiernan focused on instead was the revelation to a character of other worlds that may be less than a step away, and what that may mean to the character.

    The Red Tree, as simple and straight-forward as the prose is (and I'm having a hard time naming a better current prose stylist than Kiernan), is a complex novel. It combines Kiernan's Lovecraftian/Machen-like imagination with a Shirley Jackson-like concern for understanding her main character. Since the main character is not altogether reliable, you have to work your way through the novel, weighing what is said and what is meant -- is this character having a supernatural/paranormal experience or is she going insane? It's a novel I expect to reward rereading in the future.

    There was an official SFFWorld review here, http://www.sffworld.com/brevoff/596.html

    I'd say that I've been reading Kiernan more for the quality of her prose and her Gothic imagination than for her plotting.

    Randy M.


    Addendum: Came across this over my lunch hour as I was reading further in To Charles Fort, With Love. It's from the afterword to her short story, "Nor the Demons Down Under the Sea": “This is one of those stories which takes very seriously my belief that dark fiction dealing with the inexplicable should, itself, present to the reader a certain inexplicability. It’s not about resolution or understanding, but that brief, disturbing contact which usually characterizes actual paranormal encounters.”
    Last edited by Randy M.; April 4th, 2012 at 11:27 AM.

  6. #171
    Registered User Loerwyn's Avatar
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    I'm losing my Miéville virginity to Un Lun Dun. About 50 pages into it and I've already giggled.

  7. #172
    Quote Originally Posted by Hellions View Post
    I don't know, I would argue that a certain violent scene in the final book could be shocking to teenagers and would disqualify it for recommendation.
    Ehhhh, I read both the Covenant books and the Darkover books when I was in high school -- and that was a looooong time ago, when teenagers weren't nearly as conversant about sexual issues as they are these days. I think most teens would handle it just fine.

  8. #173
    Sony Reader PRS-650 Astra_'s Avatar
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    Finished Night of Knives by by Ian C. Esslemont yesterday.
    Steven Erikson tells us in the Introduction that it is not fan fiction. Alas, it reads like one.
    The atmosphere is similar to Erikson’s Malazan world and it encourages. Then, flat, one dimensional characters ruin it. There is just not enough depth. Unfamiliar monsters, magic and boring characters are thrown into one big pile of boring narration.
    I would not even finish the book if not for want to learn more about Kellanved and Dancer. The confrontation of the couple with Surly.
    The overall impression is of reading an Appendix A of you know what book.

    Once again I dive into Malazan World.
    The Bonehunters.

  9. #174
    Registered User JustaStaffer's Avatar
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    Finished The Killing Moon by NK Jemisin over the weekend. Loved it. Not quite the narrative masterpiece that was 100K Kingdoms, but it's got a lot more depth.

    Not sure what to read next...

  10. #175
    I just finished The Wise Man's Fear and that was awesome can't wait for the next one. I just began Furies of Calderon and its been good so far however I can't really say being only a few chapters in.
    Last edited by Hobbit; March 27th, 2012 at 03:16 PM. Reason: Signatures as given not accepted at SFFWorld.

  11. #176
    Just finished Retribution Falls by Wooding. It was pretty good. I know there are one or two sequels already so just for the sake of discussion - where would the story go from here? Retribution Falls is a sort of story of redemption. Now that people are "redeemed" new stories would just be adventures without the added dimension of learning back stories and the development that happened in the first book. Which is fine if that is what they are. To me Retribution Falls worked as a stand alone and I can't see how the story could match the first book if it is just more of the same (which is what it looks like from the descriptions of the sequels).

  12. #177
    Reader Moderator NickeeCoco's Avatar
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    Further into Deadhouse Gates. Hoping my suspicions about Fiddler are correct.

  13. #178
    Quote Originally Posted by JustaStaffer View Post
    Finished The Killing Moon by NK Jemisin over the weekend. Loved it. Not quite the narrative masterpiece that was 100K Kingdoms, but it's got a lot more depth.

    Not sure what to read next...
    This is one of my more anticipated books of the year. I'm a little jealous of anyone getting an advanced copy. It's good to hear that you enjoyed it.

  14. #179
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustaStaffer View Post
    Finished The Killing Moon by NK Jemisin over the weekend. Loved it. Not quite the narrative masterpiece that was 100K Kingdoms, but it's got a lot more depth.

    Not sure what to read next...
    Redshirts? Oh wait...

  15. #180
    Felis silvestris Hellions's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy M. View Post
    Addendum: Came across this over my lunch hour as I was reading further in To Charles Fort, With Love. It's from the afterword to her short story, "Nor Demons Under the Sea": “This is one of those stories which takes very seriously my belief that dark fiction dealing with the inexplicable should, itself, present to the reader a certain inexplicability. It’s not about resolution or understanding, but that brief, disturbing contact which usually characterizes actual paranormal encounters.”
    It's a shame really for those rationalists amongst us who would prefer to have those sensible explanations. Then again, maybe Kiernan's style wouldn't mesh well with a heavy dose of realism and is actually better suited for those weird atmospheres and this certain "inexplicability"?
    Thank you for the detailed response, The Red Tree does look interesting.



    Quote Originally Posted by Contrarius View Post
    Ehhhh, I read both the Covenant books and the Darkover books when I was in high school -- and that was a looooong time ago, when teenagers weren't nearly as conversant about sexual issues as they are these days. I think most teens would handle it just fine.
    I can agree with you on an individual level. However rape scenes are a polarizing issue and seeing as some adults can't stomach them, I would have reservations about recommending such material to teens. You've mentioned Covenant and it's hard to ignore the huge negativity that has arisen because of that ONE scene, whether justified or not (especially as there are plenty of other reasons to lambast Lord Foul's Bane ). Hence the precautions but hey, maybe you're right and I'm not giving teenagers enough credit. I just wouldn't be comfortable doing it.

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