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  1. #1

    Series Akin to the Kingkiller Chronicles?

    I searched a few times and didn't have much luck; if this post is duplicative, feel free to point me in the right direction and delete.

    I am about 50 pages from finishing The Name of the Wind and A Wise Man's Fear for the second time. Absolutely love these books. In the past six months or so, I've burned through a lot of great series including:

    • MBotF
    • WoT
    • ASoIaF
    • The First Law Trilogy
    • The Mistborn Series
    • Four books of the Sword of Truth series (sorry to fans, but good gracious I thought this was awful; first series I couldn't finish)


    And several others that I can't remember offhand. While I love WoT and MBotF, I've found that a good portion of my enjoyment of the first two KK books is the focus on a single protagonist / narrative perspective. I enjoy the myriad storylines used by Erikson / GRRM / etc., but sometimes it gets a bit much and somewhat frustrating when you don't hear from a favorite character for a long time, even a whole book in GRRM's case.

    Does anyone have any recommendations that are fairly similar to the KK Chronicles in terms of structure? I like the medieval fantasy setting and really enjoyed the University aspect. Unrequited love is great, but common enough that it's fairly prevalent. A happy ending would also be nice. I've given Glen Cook a shot, but it just didn't seem to fit for me. I've been thinking about picking up The Red Wolf Conspiracy (The Chathrand Voyages #1) by Robert Redick, but I'm not sure if I'll enjoy the sea-focused setting as much. I read the Scar by Mieville about a year ago, and while pretty cool, just didn't resonate with me; I think I like horses / knights / armor / etc. too much.

    Hopefully I haven't been too absurdly vague here. I'd like to have something to burn through until a A Memory of Light comes out, and hopefully something for afterwards as well.

  2. #2
    Unreasonable reasoner
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    The closest I've read is "Blood Song" by Anthony Ryan, though it's first of a series and the sequels aren't out yet.

    Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb.

    "Prince of Thorns" by Mark Lawrence is 1st person and very entertaining in my opinion.

  3. #3
    Thanks Choki. Farseer Trilogy is on my to do list, but holding off a bit. I've been a bit wary of the "anti-hero" archetype Prince of Thorns seems to employ since reading "The First Law" series (great, but the ending killed me). I think I am going to given the Riyria Revelations series a shot. One person named it one of their top 2012 reads in the thread here and the setting / structure seems to mesh pretty well with what I want on the surface (traditional fantasy, limited number of protagonists, etc.). If anyone has strong opinions either way about the series, I'd love to hear it.

  4. #4
    Blood Song is really what you need to read!

  5. #5
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    Red Wolf Conspiracy...

    I think you would really enjoy the Red Wolf Conspiracy. The plots and subplots, twists and turns are captivating. The romance is somewhat similar in some cases to NoTW and WMF. The last book in the series is just about to be released so I can't speak to the ending, but it is one of the best series I have read.

    Another series you might like is Terra Incognita by Kevin Anderson. I also like it a lot though it is partially set at sea (though not as much as Red Wolf). I don't hear about this series that much and I think it is underrated. This is a finished series (important to me).

    Another one of my very favorite series is the Inda series by Sherwood Smith. Again an underrated gem. Very epic is scope, well written and character driven. Though there is the caveat that one of the books in the series if very nautical (pirates), with some pirate subplots in later volumes... But the majority of the series involves an equestrian based militaristic society.

    The newer Deed of Paksnarrion books by Elisabeth Moon are also quite wonderful. She has matured as a writer from the first series (which I also liked but these show a definite improvement in characterization). Again one of my favorites.

  6. #6
    The best books I've read lately are WoT, MBOTF, FirstLaw, Mistborn, ASOIAF, and Abercrombie's other Standalone's. Those were all really good. Sword of Truth doesn't seem like a book I would like at this point. Nor does Shanara, which I find similar to that type. So I would say my tastes seem to be closely related to yours.

    I have tried Wizard of EarthSea, Farseer, Colfire trilogy, and Demon Cycle lately and wouldn't recommend any of them. Demon Cycle MAYBE. So with that said, I can't recommend Farseer. I read book1 and probably won't attempt book2. I do plan on reading Riryia's books. He's going to be one of my next reads. I've heard only good things. I would also seriously highly recommend Abercrombie's Best Served Cold and The Heroes. Stephen King's Dark Tower is another one worth reading. Two that I am looking forward to most(besides KingKiller which I'm waiting for book3 to start) are Scott Bakker's Prince of Nothing and Scott Lynch's Gentlemen Bastard. Haven't read either, but pretty confident I will like both.
    Last edited by chris777; December 3rd, 2012 at 07:41 PM.

  7. #7
    What have we learned? Skynjay's Avatar
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    The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch seems like the go to here. While not in a university it does deal with the learning process of two main characters in a centralized setting much like Kingkiller. It was my favorite new discovery last year. For something different try The Folding Knife by KJ Parker. If you enjoyed the rise and fall of Kvothe, then it may be up your alley, though it may not technically fall under your happy ending request. The Spirit Thief by Rachael Aaron has a very Kvothe like character, Eli Monpress is very much the full of himself scamp that young Kvothe is.

    For what it is worth lots of people love the Ryria books(including my co-reviewer), but I couldn't even finish the first one, it was a week comparison to other thief books like those out by Lynch and Rachael Aaron, so I would start there if the sub-genre interests you.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by finnskeeper View Post
    I think you would really enjoy the Red Wolf Conspiracy. The plots and subplots, twists and turns are captivating. The romance is somewhat similar in some cases to NoTW and WMF. The last book in the series is just about to be released so I can't speak to the ending, but it is one of the best series I have read.

    Another series you might like is Terra Incognita by Kevin Anderson. I also like it a lot though it is partially set at sea (though not as much as Red Wolf). I don't hear about this series that much and I think it is underrated. This is a finished series (important to me).

    Another one of my very favorite series is the Inda series by Sherwood Smith. Again an underrated gem. Very epic is scope, well written and character driven. Though there is the caveat that one of the books in the series if very nautical (pirates), with some pirate subplots in later volumes... But the majority of the series involves an equestrian based militaristic society.

    The newer Deed of Paksnarrion books by Elisabeth Moon are also quite wonderful. She has matured as a writer from the first series (which I also liked but these show a definite improvement in characterization). Again one of my favorites.
    I'll back up the Chathrand series, I love this. I have to get the last book soon!
    I've only read NotW so far, but I hear Blood song is similar.

  9. #9
    I've also been interested in books similar to Kingkiller Chronicle. Rothfuss is one of my favorite contemporary fantasy authors. One thing in particular that interested me was the magic university. I'm gonna give The Magicians by Lev Grossman a try because it sounds like it fits into that category. I'll let you know how it measures up to Rothfuss. Of course, when talking about magic schools it's hard not to mention Harry Potter.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by chokipokilo View Post
    "Prince of Thorns" by Mark Lawrence is 1st person and very entertaining in my opinion.
    Quote Originally Posted by Skynjay View Post
    The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch seems like the go to here.
    It's funny these are mentioned because I was just reading King of Thorns yesterday and thinking about how Lawrence's style reminds me of Lynch. Not sure what it is, exactly, but my brain was making the connection on some level. But neither of them really remind me of Rothfuss. The one thing that I think Jorg might have in common with Kvothe (and Severian from Book of the New Sun for that matter) is that they all strike me as unreliable narrators.

  11. #11
    Lots of great responses here; thanks. I read the six Riyria Revelations books in like a week. Enjoyable and I would recommend to Chris777 and others with similar interests. It doesn't hold a candle to a series like MBotF in terms of lore, plot development, prose, etc. but it made me smile / laugh several times and it had a really great ending that tied everything together nicely.

    Quote Originally Posted by chris777 View Post
    The best books I've read lately are WoT, MBOTF, FirstLaw, Mistborn, ASOIAF, and Abercrombie's other Standalone's. Those were all really good. Sword of Truth doesn't seem like a book I would like at this point. Nor does Shanara, which I find similar to that type. So I would say my tastes seem to be closely related to yours.

    I have tried Wizard of EarthSea, Farseer, Colfire trilogy, and Demon Cycle lately and wouldn't recommend any of them. Demon Cycle MAYBE. So with that said, I can't recommend Farseer. I read book1 and probably won't attempt book2. I do plan on reading Riryia's books. He's going to be one of my next reads. I've heard only good things. I would also seriously highly recommend Abercrombie's Best Served Cold and The Heroes. Stephen King's Dark Tower is another one worth reading. Two that I am looking forward to most(besides KingKiller which I'm waiting for book3 to start) are Scott Bakker's Prince of Nothing and Scott Lynch's Gentlemen Bastard. Haven't read either, but pretty confident I will like both.
    I am going to give Best Served Cold a shot next I think. I could go for a strong heroine; I'd also like some grit / gore / sex, a lot of the books I've read recently have been pretty good-natured. I'm a bit tentative to The Heroes because I really hated Black Dow in The First Law Trilogy. Abercrombie needs to drop the anti-hero motif with Ninefingers and put together another trilogy with a positive spin; Logan was an awesome character.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skynjay
    The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch seems like the go to here. While not in a university it does deal with the learning process of two main characters in a centralized setting much like Kingkiller. It was my favorite new discovery last year.
    This sounds interesting, but I refuse to do series that aren't completed as I apparently have the patience of a two-year old. You should have seen my face when I burned through all 12 WoT books and went to download the last one only to find out it wasn't coming out for like 8 months. So brutal haha. I can appreciate your comment about Riyria Revelations though; it is pretty vanilla for a tale focused on thieves. I'd like to give the Dagger and the Coin a shot, but I'll wait until the last book comes out in March.

    Quote Originally Posted by Finnskeeper
    The newer Deed of Paksnarrion books by Elisabeth Moon are also quite wonderful. She has matured as a writer from the first series (which I also liked but these show a definite improvement in characterization). Again one of my favorites.
    Does anyone else have an opinion on these books? They sound intriguing; almost a Medieval version of Mulan.

  12. #12
    Lots of great responses here; thanks. I read the six Riyria Revelations books in like a week. Enjoyable and I would recommend to Chris777 and others with similar interests. It doesn't hold a candle to a series like MBotF in terms of lore, plot development, prose, etc. but it made me smile / laugh several times and it had a really great ending that tied everything together nicely.

    Quote Originally Posted by chris777 View Post
    The best books I've read lately are WoT, MBOTF, FirstLaw, Mistborn, ASOIAF, and Abercrombie's other Standalone's. Those were all really good. Sword of Truth doesn't seem like a book I would like at this point. Nor does Shanara, which I find similar to that type. So I would say my tastes seem to be closely related to yours.

    I have tried Wizard of EarthSea, Farseer, Colfire trilogy, and Demon Cycle lately and wouldn't recommend any of them. Demon Cycle MAYBE. So with that said, I can't recommend Farseer. I read book1 and probably won't attempt book2. I do plan on reading Riryia's books. He's going to be one of my next reads. I've heard only good things. I would also seriously highly recommend Abercrombie's Best Served Cold and The Heroes. Stephen King's Dark Tower is another one worth reading. Two that I am looking forward to most(besides KingKiller which I'm waiting for book3 to start) are Scott Bakker's Prince of Nothing and Scott Lynch's Gentlemen Bastard. Haven't read either, but pretty confident I will like both.
    I am going to give Best Served Cold a shot next I think. I could go for a strong heroine; I'd also like some grit / gore / sex, a lot of the books I've read recently have been pretty good-natured. I'm a bit tentative to The Heroes because I really hated Black Dow in The First Law Trilogy. Abercrombie needs to drop the anti-hero motif with Ninefingers and put together another trilogy with a positive spin; Logan was an awesome character.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skynjay
    The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch seems like the go to here. While not in a university it does deal with the learning process of two main characters in a centralized setting much like Kingkiller. It was my favorite new discovery last year.
    This sounds interesting, but I refuse to do series that aren't completed as I apparently have the patience of a two-year old. You should have seen my face when I burned through all 12 WoT books and went to download the last one only to find out it wasn't coming out for like 8 months. So brutal haha. I can appreciate your comment about Riyria Revelations though; it is pretty vanilla for a tale focused on thieves. I'd like to give the Dagger and the Coin a shot, but I'll wait until the last book comes out in March.

    Quote Originally Posted by Finnskeeper
    The newer Deed of Paksnarrion books by Elisabeth Moon are also quite wonderful. She has matured as a writer from the first series (which I also liked but these show a definite improvement in characterization). Again one of my favorites.
    Does anyone else have an opinion on these books? They sound intriguing; almost a Medieval version of Mulan.

  13. #13
    I wrote a lengthy response with quotes to everyone who replied, but it disappeared somehow during the approval process a few days ago (think because my post count is low).

    Some great responses here; thanks. I ended up going with Best Served Cold first (thanks Chris) and am about a third through it; hopefully the ending is not as rough as The First Law Trilogy. I'll likely follow that up with The Chathrand Voyage trilogy which should be finished right about when A Memory of Light (last WoT book) is released. After that, I'm not sure. I may give the Dagger and the Coin series a go as I believe the last book is scheduled to be released in March 2013.

  14. #14
    So I'm about 1/4 of the way into The Magicians and Grossman has a very different writing style than Rothfuss. The two biggest differences I notice are pace and word choice.

    Rothfuss is a wordsmith who takes a lot of time to tell his story using flowery and descriptive language. I think it's about 200+ pages into Name of the Wind before Kvothe makes it to the University, and there was an elaborate background on sympathy and how the magic of the world operated.

    By contrast, two chapters into The Magicians and Quentin is already at school casting spells. Grossman's pace of storytelling is faster and his word choice is more economical and matter-of-fact.

    Neither of these are bad things, in fact I find both books enjoyable and they certainly have the "magic school" element in common, but other than that they strike me as very different books.

  15. #15
    http://tinyurl.com/363ogv DurzoBlint's Avatar
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    Peter V. Brett's writing style reminds me of Rothfuss in some respect. First book in his Demon Cycle series is The Warded Man or The Painted Man (depending on if your in the US/UK market). The third book in the series The Daylight War is set to be released in February and I just finished it and think it is probably the best one yet.

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