Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23
  1. #1

    The Departure by Neal Asher

    I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of Neal Asher's forthcoming novel, The Departure, which is the start of his new Owner trilogy. My review is available on my blog - Review: The Departure by Neal Asher.

    It's not a Polity novel and is very dark at stages. Lots of action and violent, gory deaths. A must for all Asher fans!

  2. #2
    martinelillycrop martielillycrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Taunton
    Posts
    81
    Blog Entries
    1
    You lucky, lucky thing!

    TBH I felt Asher's polity novels were getting stale several years ago, so I'm glad he's moved on. He was my favourite novelist for a while, but I must confess I was so uninspired by a couple of the later Polity offerings, I didn't bother with his subsequent stuff.

    I just read your review and this new book sounds awesome. So much so, I've now preordered a copy off amazon.

    Thanks for putting this up.

  3. #3
    oooh no I see what you're saying, but they started out fresh with poor characters (new author), went 'mild' at the stage you lost interest (prador moon?) then bounced back with tighter personalities for spatterjay and the recent more technical polity stuff. His 'gore' is just at the level where it's graphic novel style in my mind so not upsetting, which I'm so grateful for to him, though I think he'd like to be stephen donaldson heavy I'm so glad he's not. I'm looking forward to it.

  4. #4
    I've read a lot of Asher this year: Line of Polity, Brass Man, Polity Agent and Line War in January, The Technician in February, and then The Skinner and Voyage of the Sable Keech in March/April. I enjoyed them all - the Cormac books & Technician for the first time and the Spatterjay ones for something like the fourth time. I've also read all the Owner short stories (these are set way in the future compared to The Departure) and they are among my favourite stories ever.

    I'm reading The Departure at the moment and I'm struggling a little, to be honest. It's good, but missing that something that I enjoy from Neal's writing. I think the relatively near future setting is probably the reason, although I plan on finishing it soon and will withhold judgement until then...

  5. #5
    I actually enjoyed the near future setting of The Departure. The technology seems very familiar from the Polity universe, but is in its infancy. I think you might actually almost view this as an alternate history of Earth before the Polity (but that might be a stretch).

    I read The Departure shortly after finishing the entire Cormac series in a months time. I've finally managed to track down a copy of Engineer ReConditioned in which the Owner short stories are included, so it would be interesting to see what they are like.

    I think the Owner trilogy has some great potential. It's similar enough to the Cormac series to feel familiar, but the more dystopian setting is refreshing.

    The gore is on a normal Asher level, and perhaps slightly upped. Lots of people have their heads forcibly removed from their bodies, and bodily fluids spewing out into vacuum. Just the right mix for my tastes.

  6. #6
    martinelillycrop martielillycrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Taunton
    Posts
    81
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by pox View Post
    oooh no I see what you're saying, but they started out fresh with poor characters (new author), went 'mild' at the stage you lost interest (prador moon?) then bounced back with tighter personalities for spatterjay and the recent more technical polity stuff. His 'gore' is just at the level where it's graphic novel style in my mind so not upsetting, which I'm so grateful for to him, though I think he'd like to be stephen donaldson heavy I'm so glad he's not. I'm looking forward to it.
    I didn't get as far as Prador Moon. I don't think I finished Polity Agent, in fact.

    I loved the Spatterjay novels, which is why I kept reading his Cormack stuff - I was hoping some of the brilliance of The Skinner would make an appearance. Brass Man was OK but I struggled to finish Cowl (which, admittedly, is a stand-alone novel).

    I suspect he was given too short a deadline by his publishers - 3 book contract to be delivered in 1 year or something ridiculous like that. Shame, if so, as it seems to have affected his standard of writing.

  7. #7
    I'd not considered that but having read them back to back in order I put it down to straight 'development' of him as a writer. I think the bits that are 'less good' let us say may well be down to external pressures, but he doesn't suffer from the total loss of reason or story or worth in the way that Hamilton or Reynolds can and do with his arcs.

  8. #8
    fact is also you can go ask him in his forum on here, he's very responsive!


  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by pox View Post
    fact is also you can go ask him in his forum on here, he's very responsive!

    He might be less so now since he's currently in Crete. He normally pops up every Wednesday now.

  10. #10
    I've got a great interview with Neal Asher up on my blog, which includes a sneak peek at the blurb for Zero Point - check it out!

  11. #11
    how's The Departure gone down with people. I've seen some terrible reviews. ??

  12. #12
    screw other peoples reviews, I ordered it.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by pox View Post
    screw other peoples reviews, I ordered it.
    It's best to make up your own mind. I really enjoyed it and found it to be a promising start to a new storyline and setting.

    Most of the negative reviews are due to the fact that this is not a Polity novel and that people don't agree with the political views expressed in the novel.

  14. #14
    Read interesting books
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ada, MI, USA
    Posts
    2,833
    I actually happen to agree with a lot of the politics of Neal Asher and i enjoyed the first part of the Departure which is the political part, but I disliked the second part which is just James Bond shoot them up not the interesting sf that Mr. Asher usually puts out; still in the series though

  15. #15
    I think the best part of the Owner series is still to come. Like with the Cormac series the first book was just to set the scene. All the really interesting stuff happened in the later books.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •