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  1. #1

    Where is Horror going?

    Where do you see the Horror genre going in the near future? Will there be more Horror novels published or less? Will Zombies remain a popular subject or will they fade and will something else take their place?

  2. #2
    Registered User Snowy's Avatar
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    I have not read any horror novels in a long while now, the last ones being some of Clive Barkers which kinda leaned on the side of fantasy over horror (e.g. Imagica), but used to enjoy James Herbert, Shaun Hutson etc when I was younger.

    In terms of zombies, thats a difficult call. Guessing by your moniker you are a fan, as am I when they are done well. I never found zombies particularly scary but love a well made zombie film. They have certainly been well used of late, from WWZ and How to survive a zombie apocalypse in literature, Left 4 Dead 1 & 2, Dead Island etc in gaming, and unnumerable films in recent years - maybe zombies and vampires need a rest for a while?

  3. #3
    I like zombies, although I actually have not read much zombie fiction lately. I am reading IT right now actually.

  4. #4
    Fulgurous Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    Werewolves are still giving it a go. Monsters, demons, and post-apoc or dystopian secondary world horror with monsters and/or demons seems to be happening. Cursed objects pop up on a regular basis, and ghosts, often in haunted houses. Haunted places seems definitely to be of interest in film -- the Chernobyl film, Paranormal Activity, etc. SF horror has been mainly concentrated on zombies, but I suspect we'll be seeing a fair number of alien monster horror in film and book, a la Prometheus. Horror is a fairly large player in the graphic novel field -- I don't know as much about what's going on there.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by KatG View Post
    Werewolves are still giving it a go. Monsters, demons, and post-apoc or dystopian secondary world horror with monsters and/or demons seems to be happening. Cursed objects pop up on a regular basis, and ghosts, often in haunted houses. Haunted places seems definitely to be of interest in film -- the Chernobyl film, Paranormal Activity, etc. SF horror has been mainly concentrated on zombies, but I suspect we'll be seeing a fair number of alien monster horror in film and book, a la Prometheus. Horror is a fairly large player in the graphic novel field -- I don't know as much about what's going on there.
    And a fair amount of Lovecraftian/weird fiction is popping up: novels from Night Shade books (John Jacobs Horner & Laird Barron) and Roc (Caitlin Kiernan), as well as several anthologies -- original stories from Titan & Dark Horse, reprints from Prime & Night Shade. Maybe the Vandermeer's anthology The Weird is a harbinger for still more.

    I expect we'll continue to see a lot of horror from small presses catering to the tastes of small groups of horror readers -- there are a lot of zombie books from small presses now, for instance. With e-publishing, that may increase quite a bit.


    Randy M.

  6. #6
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    Can't disagree with any of that: these things tend to go around in cycles. We've supposedly begun a resurgence with Horror here in the UK, though I don't think it's as obvious as some would think. The small presses have always kept the genre going here (PS Publishing and the like.)

    Think we're seeing a return to scary vampires, rather than twinkly. Urban Fantasy in the Dresden Files vein seems to still be popular.

    Lovecraftian horrors: definitely. And like Randy, I do think The Weird collection is partly to blame, that and China Mieville.

    But I also think we're getting a lot more mainstream novels (crime/detectives and the like) with supernatural/horror elements, as the genre filters out to the mainstream. Who are now claiming it to be something new.

    Mark
    Mark

  7. #7
    Fulgurous Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    I was sort of not counting those because they sort of straddle horror and dark fantasy (they sort of make up a lot of dark fantasy,) and the amount of horror material in the stories varies. But yes, Lovecraft is feeling the love right now, which is nice. I think I also should have thrown epidemics in there. Epidemics titles seem to pop up.

    The horror resurgence in the UK sounds like its main thrust is horror in films and t.v., and horror is continuing to do well in film all over, but written horror in general will be getting a fair amount of titles because publishers launched the horror category market about seven years ago, and definitely there are some indie titles, although I haven't heard of a specific break-out horror indie writer as yet. (But there may well be some ones.)

  8. #8
    There is a hell of a lot going on in horror fiction right now, you have your modern classic style like Ligotti, Straub, Lumley, Campbell, Simmons, and of course King, who are all still going strong.

    Then you have your Splatterpunks, Skipp, Lansdale, McCammon, Ketchum, Lee, and Spector are all still writing.

    There are your dark fiction writers like Bryan Smith, Brian Keene, Gord Rollo, Mary SanGiovani, J.F. Gonzalez, Cody Goodfellow, Robert Devereaux, and Wrath James White.

    Now we also have bizarro fiction writers like Carlton Mellick III, Steve Aylett, Jeff Burk, Eckhard Gerdes, D. Harlan Wilson, Chris Genoa, Andrew Goldfarb, Cameron Pierce, and Bradley Sands. The love of the horror genre is growing stronger all the time and I really think it will surpass fantasy and science fiction in the years to come.

    Zombies will never go away, just like vampires, werewolves, ghosts, and demons. There are still people who believe they could exist today. I have a friend who firmly believes that a zombie apocalypse is on the horizon.
    Last edited by Bob Gray; May 13th, 2012 at 01:08 PM.

  9. #9
    I think there will be more, although I think there will be more books published in general.

    Zombies? Yeah, here to stay I think. In the end, most zombie stories end up pretty similar, but I think that's what makes them interesting. Vampires will always be around as well, in some form.

    I'm more just curious if there will every be another Stephen King or that caliber of horror author. Since publishing has become relatively easy, and there's a glut of books in general, it will be interesting to see how well authors are able to make themselves noticed. I think horror in particular is a very populist genre.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mrfancypants View Post
    I think there will be more, although I think there will be more books published in general.

    Zombies? Yeah, here to stay I think. In the end, most zombie stories end up pretty similar, but I think that's what makes them interesting. Vampires will always be around as well, in some form.

    I'm more just curious if there will every be another Stephen King or that caliber of horror author. Since publishing has become relatively easy, and there's a glut of books in general, it will be interesting to see how well authors are able to make themselves noticed. I think horror in particular is a very populist genre.
    There are a few that I would put in King territory. Dan Simmons, been around for a while but I feel that he is getting a lot of that same recognition that King did and he is the only person that I've read that reminds me of King's style, I'm not sure why, he is just one of those writers that I feel I will be reading for a very long time.

    Brian Keene, not similar in style but has a very unique style all his own, at the same time he does bring a lot of pop culture into his stories the way King does. He receives a lot of recognition, continues to write extensively including novels, short stories, comic books, cross-over stories and the like. He has written almost as much as King but in a shorter amount of time. It seems like he always has six or seven different projects going on at the same time.

    Last but certainly not least, Joe Hill, mostly because of the quality of writing and the fact that in comparison to his father he has written very little, he is about where his father was when he wrote Salem's Lot or The Shining, so there will most likely be much more high caliber writing in the future. Part of it is too, though not much, because he is his father's son.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gray View Post
    There are a few that I would put in King territory. Dan Simmons, been around for a while but I feel that he is getting a lot of that same recognition that King did and he is the only person that I've read that reminds me of King's style, I'm not sure why, he is just one of those writers that I feel I will be reading for a very long time.

    Brian Keene, not similar in style but has a very unique style all his own, at the same time he does bring a lot of pop culture into his stories the way King does. He receives a lot of recognition, continues to write extensively including novels, short stories, comic books, cross-over stories and the like. He has written almost as much as King but in a shorter amount of time. It seems like he always has six or seven different projects going on at the same time.
    I think from a quality of writing standpoint Simmons and Joe Hill come close (not as sure about Brian keene, since I haven't read any of his books), but I don't know from a recognition standpoint. Stephen King is a household name, sort of a brand unto himself. Dan Simmons is well known by horror fans, but I'm not sure how well known he is outside of that circle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gray View Post
    but certainly not least, Joe Hill, mostly because of the quality of writing and the fact that in comparison to his father he has written very little, he is about where his father was when he wrote Salem's Lot or The Shining, so there will most likely be much more high caliber writing in the future. Part of it is too, though not much, because he is his father's son.
    I do think, as much as he probably doesn't like it, being who he is probably might help him get over a few hurdles in terms of becoming known outside of horror fans. His writing is excellent, but people (for better or worse) will connect with his pedigree, now that it's known.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by mrfancypants View Post
    I think from a quality of writing standpoint Simmons and Joe Hill come close (not as sure about Brian keene, since I haven't read any of his books), but I don't know from a recognition standpoint. Stephen King is a household name, sort of a brand unto himself. Dan Simmons is well known by horror fans, but I'm not sure how well known he is outside of that circle.



    I do think, as much as he probably doesn't like it, being who he is probably might help him get over a few hurdles in terms of becoming known outside of horror fans. His writing is excellent, but people (for better or worse) will connect with his pedigree, now that it's known.
    No, Simmons isn't exactly a household name yet but here's the thing, when I go to Barnes and Noble I am able to find only a few horror writers on the shelves. Barker, whom I wouldn't say is anything like King, Koontz who again is nothing like King, King of course, and yes Simmons. That tells me he is a very popular writer, and since we're talking about what the future holds for horror, I would say that Simmons is headed for that mainstream recognition that King has. Maybe you will say that just because Simmons can be found in every local bookstore doesn't put him in Stephen King territory and I can concede that you could be right, but I challenge you to go to your bookstore (retail not used) and see how many modern horror writers you can find. Oh, you will probably find Brian Keene and Joe Hill as well.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gray View Post
    No, Simmons isn't exactly a household name yet but here's the thing, when I go to Barnes and Noble I am able to find only a few horror writers on the shelves. Barker, whom I wouldn't say is anything like King, Koontz who again is nothing like King, King of course, and yes Simmons. That tells me he is a very popular writer, and since we're talking about what the future holds for horror, I would say that Simmons is headed for that mainstream recognition that King has. Maybe you will say that just because Simmons can be found in every local bookstore doesn't put him in Stephen King territory and I can concede that you could be right, but I challenge you to go to your bookstore (retail not used) and see how many modern horror writers you can find. Oh, you will probably find Brian Keene and Joe Hill as well.
    That's a fair point. It's probably not entirely fair to try comparisons with Stephen King anyway.

    To be a little clearer, though, my main point of discussion was looking even further out than the current crop of authors, who I agree, still likely have a decent chance at gaining significant individual recognition. I'm more thinking say, 10 years out, as e-books continue to come, self-publishing becomes even easier, and the publishing industry model shifts (assuming that it will). I'm more just speculating as to whether the genre (and maybe books as a whole) will be more made up of numerous (thousands) of individual authors (I hesitate to use the word "amateur," but along those lines), with a more flat level of popularity across the whole. I'm sure good authors will still rise above to some extent, but with the ease of publishing now, it will be interesting to see if the next generation of writers will have as much opportunity to differentiate themselves.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by mrfancypants View Post
    That's a fair point. It's probably not entirely fair to try comparisons with Stephen King anyway.

    To be a little clearer, though, my main point of discussion was looking even further out than the current crop of authors, who I agree, still likely have a decent chance at gaining significant individual recognition. I'm more thinking say, 10 years out, as e-books continue to come, self-publishing becomes even easier, and the publishing industry model shifts (assuming that it will). I'm more just speculating as to whether the genre (and maybe books as a whole) will be more made up of numerous (thousands) of individual authors (I hesitate to use the word "amateur," but along those lines), with a more flat level of popularity across the whole. I'm sure good authors will still rise above to some extent, but with the ease of publishing now, it will be interesting to see if the next generation of writers will have as much opportunity to differentiate themselves.
    I'm not a big ebook fan but I don't believe it will effect the quality of writing in the future. I'm not disputing that the amount of self-publishing may effect the amount of amateur writing that becomes available but there has always been self-publishing. I feel that the next generation will go above and beyond in differentiating themselves.

  15. #15
    Browser Triceratops's Avatar
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    Well, I hope it's not going anywhere soon. Just sold a werewolf book that isn't really a werewolf book, per se, because it departs from the usual tradition and tropes. Zombie films seem to have picked up somewhat. I do know I enjoyed Zombieland, for what it was worth. I think the genre needs a shot in the arm via a new writer, with a great voice and unique slant or concept.

    chris

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