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  1. #1
    Peckish hippokrene's Avatar
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    What Listening to a Story Does to Our Brains.

    I thought this might be of interest.

    We all enjoy a good story, whether it’s a novel, a movie or simply something one of our friends is explaining to us that they’ve experienced. But why do we feel so much more engaged when we hear a narrative about events?

    It’s in fact quite simple. If we listen to a powerpoint presentation with boring bullet points, a certain part in the brain gets activated. Scientists call this Broca’s area and Wernicke’s area. Overall, it hits our language processing parts in the brain, where we decode words into meaning. And that’s it, nothing else happens.

    When we are being told a story though, things change dramatically found researchers in Spain. Not only are the language processing parts in our brain activated, but any other area in our brain, that we would use when experiencing the events of the story are too.

  2. #2
    It could be worse. ~tmso Moderator N. E. White's Avatar
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    Hmmm, that's an interesting quote. I didn't read the full article, but I'm not sure if they got that right. I've heard that that is the same for when we (silently) read a story, too. Not sure where I heard that, but essentially when we read, our brain thinks we are actually experiencing the story. So, I'm not sure it is unique to listening to a story.

  3. #3
    Author tchrofengl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by N. E. White View Post
    Hmmm, that's an interesting quote. I didn't read the full article, but I'm not sure if they got that right. I've heard that that is the same for when we (silently) read a story, too. Not sure where I heard that, but essentially when we read, our brain thinks we are actually experiencing the story. So, I'm not sure it is unique to listening to a story.
    Listening to stories and reading them do use some different parts of our brains, so we do relate differently. When we read silently, we can skim over words and still get the story, when we listen (without reading along), we listen to each word, so our understanding and appreciation is a little different. Some students of mine prefer reading stories aloud while others prefer reading to themselves, and different students can get what they need from both methods, albeit with varying degree of success.

  4. #4
    A powerpoint can be engaging, too.
    The problem is boring people ruining it.
    Igor

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