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  1. #76
    King of the Lurkers. Moderator Keyoke's Avatar
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    It's been so long since I've posted anything, let alone scifi.

    I've started Temporal Void by Hamilton. I don't remember alot of details from Void, it's been sometime, but, I remember the essentials.

    I didnt love Dreaming Void as I have other Hamilton books, but, still gonna give this a go, as I've always enjoyed Hamilton immensely.

    Keyoke

  2. #77
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    I read more from Empty Space (the 3rd Kefauchi Tract book by MJ Harrison) and its inventiveness still astounds (like in Light) while the literary quality is very high; the one negative is that like Nova Swing this book so far has a very 70's feel - Light managed to avoid that to a lrge extent with the thread set on Earth in 1999 which felt modern and here a Anna thread started but so far the book did not return there.

    Tonight is Jack Glass publication (Th 26) and I may buy a copy and start reading it rather than continue Empty Space to which i will return immediately after though

  3. #78
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    Started Jack Glass and it seems to be one of those "cannot read anything until finished books"; the first paragraph which opens the book is so funny in so many ways

    "This narrative, which I hereby doctorwatson for your benefit, o reader, concerns the greatest mystery of our time. Of course I’m talking about McAuley’s alleged ‘discovery’ of a method of travelling faster than light, and about the murders and betrayals and violence this discovery has occasioned. Because, after all – FTL! We all know it is impossible, we know every one of us that the laws of physics disallow it. But still! And again, this narrative has to do with the greatest mind I have known – the celebrated, or infamous, Jack Glass. The one, the only Jack Glass: detective, teacher, protector and murderer, an individual gifted with extraordinary interpretive powers when it comes to murder because he was so well acquainted with murder. A quantity of blood is spilled in this story, I’m sorry to say; and a good many people die; and there is some politics too. There is danger and fear. Accordingly I have told his tale in the form of a murder mystery; or to be more precise (and at all costs we must be precise) three, connected murder mysteries."

  4. #79
    I've been really bad with my reading recently, not really having much time at all spend any significant time on anything. I've still got three books on the go: Great North Road by Peter F Hamilton, The Departure by Neal Asher, and Prophets by S Andrew Swann. If I get a chance to dip into one of those in a week it's miraculous. However, The Departure appears to be the one I'm making the most progress on, and I'm really hoping I'll finish it soon. I'll then move to one of the other two before picking something else up - I just don't have the time to read more than one at a time anymore!

  5. #80
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    I read the first part (In the Box) out of 3 from Jack Glass and it was outstanding as expected; 7 men are dumped on an asteroid where they have to serve an 11 year prison sentence by making it habitable - they are given some tools and a start with a little air in a sealed cavern, but they have to keep digging, find water, grow food, make personal chambers...

    In-between the work and reminiscences of the world outside, the pecking order is established and at the bottom there is a legless man Jac who has an obsession with shards of glass and a very fat man, Gordius, former "son/sun god" of a cult. Things happen.

    Next part called the FTL Murders starts with a cast of characters and takes place in quite different locations in the Solar System.

  6. #81
    Registered User Loerwyn's Avatar
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    I'm a couple of weeks behind some members here, but I started Caliban's War yesterday. Yippee!

  7. #82
    Registered User JamieB's Avatar
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    New to this forum, but thought I would throw in my current reading list. Working my way through Kill Decision by Daniel Suarez and Year Zero by Rob Reid.

    Kill Decision isn't really traditional scifi, more of a thriller with some near future scifi aspects. So far it's pretty good.

    Year Zero is humorous scifi. Kind of a Douglas Adams style book.

  8. #83
    I decided to put some time aside to finish The Departure by Neal Asher over the weekend, especially seeing as I needed a break from the work I was doing and it seemed to do the job well. Overall I enjoyed it, the second half being better paced and full of more interesting events than the first half. I'm still disappointed with the book, but I know that it's all down to my expectations. Seeing what happened towards the end has left me wanting to read Zero Point much more now, and with it due out in the next week or two I'll be quite happily reading it - once Prohpets and Great North Road are done!

  9. #84
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    finished Jack Glass by Adam Roberts; now about half in the reread as I cannot yet part from its universe; superb and a great introduction to his work; I plan to do a full rv for tonight and I will open a thread here and c/p it when done

    I also found out last night about Solaris Rising 1.5 an ebook only anthology just out in mid-July to bridge between Solaris Rising of last November and Solaris rising 2 of next year.

    As it has an Adam Roberts story and it is priced very well (if you get it on Kobo you can use coupons which are easily found HERE and lower its $3.99 list price - eg i got it for about 2.60 with a 35% off one) I got it on the spot and actually read the first 7 out of the 9 stories as they were relatively short and I should finish it tonight

    So far the Adam Roberts one is just awesome, the Bodard very good, the Powell and Vine ones good though seen before many times, the Lotz one decent but again seen before, the Resnick one pointless and a waste of anthology space and the Tanith Lee did not work out for me but could do for others; last 2 are Cornell and di Fillippo and I expect good things from them as both authors work well at short length for me usually; overall, good value for the price as the Roberts and Bodard stories are worth the admission price by themselves

  10. #85
    Registered User Zsinj's Avatar
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    I tried reading C.S. Lewis' "Space Trilogy" recently. I liked "Out of the Silent Planet," but once I started reading the second book in the trilogy, "Perelandra," I found that it was far too preachy for me. Really, it makes the religious overtones of his "Chronicles of Narnia" relatively tame by comparison, so I stopped about 1/4 of the way through. I'm now reading "Stranger In a Strange Land" by Robert A. Heinlein and I am thoroughly enjoying it. I really like the thriller-like atmosphere.

  11. #86
    Still working on Kim Stanley Robinson's 2312.

    There is an awful lot of telling in this book. On the one hand, I think Robinson might be one of those authors who's refined the infodump into a noble art all its own. On the other hand, some of the places there's telling feel like they might be better presented as scenes.

    Just as a for instance, since it's occured to me: The major characters of 2312 spend a lot of the middle of the book working. Building habitats, making habitats better, things like that. Very little of this is examined in the micro level in full scenes; we get detailed descriptions of some of the work, but -- so far as I remember -- we're not really grounded in that work by experiencing the characters engaging in specific instances of it much. I'd have liked some more focus on this, because it'd be cool [Paul McAuley made the formation of mud for an off-earth biome central to gripping scenes in The Quiet War; I'm sure Robinson could do it too], and also because it's central to the book's plot and in-universe politics and balance of power.

    Still an intriguing book, but I'm not sure how my ratio of love and admiration will ultimately shake out regarding it. There'll be some of both, though.

  12. #87
    Vanaeph Westsiyeed's Avatar
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    Finished Pollen, the sequel to Vurt (of sorts), by Jeff Noon. It's similar to Vurt in the writing style and cyber-style/drug culture setting, though not as focused I think. Would give Vurt 8.5 and Pollen 6.5/10.

    Started Paulo Bacigalupi's Pump Six and Other Stories, finished one story and very good so far, the story sucked me in straight away, as has the start of the second one.

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