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Thread: Your technology

  1. #1

    Your technology

    I'd like to know something. If any of you have ever written original sci-fi works--what kind of technology did you introduce? How was it used? I'm curious.

  2. #2
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    Hi. My novel is "The Ganymede Project." The technological concept is that Thought Tunneling Devices (TTDs) are capable of directly connecting neural tissue with a quantum communications channel. A U.S. government program discovers TTDs in alien tissue from a crashed UFO and experiments with them.

    The TTDs consist of very large (cell-sized) doped fullerenes. The doping creates pores of various sizes in the surface of the fullerene, allowing the interior nano-machines to characterize and interact with their biochemical environment. Once they have characterized the environment, they can modify the body plan of the host.

    In a nervous system seeded with TTDs, the devices emit various nerve growth factors (NGFs) which cause surrounding neurons to grow into the porous fullerene surface, where they interface with the channel.

    The alien race uses TTDs to communicate across vast distances at faster-than-light (FTL) speeds.

    When present-day humans begin experimenting with the devices, they inadvertently tap into a galactic internet, but the owners of the patent donít like intruders.

    The Ganymede Project is the first book in a Thought Tunnels Trilogy. The second book is in-work, and I have the third one outlined.

    Descriptions and excerpts from The Ganymede Project can be found on my web site: http://ganymede-project.com

    The site also identifies some of my current areas of interest.

    -- John S. Morrison

  3. #3
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    I received e-mail from a fan which touched on the use of technology, and thought it may be of general interest, since the question had already been raised in this forum. Here goes:

    QUESTIONS:

    John,

    I had some questions about the book I don't think most people would have picked up, but wanted to know more information. That is, if it is allowed to be shared through email or better served in person.

    Since I consider your novel "Tom Clancy-like", but more high tech, there is a usual, if not, known perception it's based on reality of some sorts. Here are my questions:

    1). Why did you name it, "Ganymede" after one Jupiter's moons? Is there something more to Jupiter than meets the eye?

    2). Why was there a character, in the back of the room, as an ambassador from "Draconius"? Why not Venus, or Andromeda?? This one intrigues me.

    3). Richard Chandra (I believe is his name) had some very interesting characteristics. Was he half human half alien or 3+ strands of this DNA was activated?

    4). Galactic Internet. I know we have talked about it, but the origination of the idea leaves me wondering since, "if" there aliens existed, a "hive" mentality would be appropriate due to advancement of their communication process where thoughts are shared instantaneously.

    5). Terminology. Actually, I am well versed on the terminology used throughout the book and it's origins, but I take it clearance had to be issued before the book was public in regards to what could be stated or not stated? I cannot think of the specific examples (I'll have to go back), but I think there were certain words I couldn't believe were allowed in the book. Maybe I'm incorrect in this manner.

    I'm sure the next book will ponder more questions.

    ANSWERS:

    Michael,

    These are good questions, and with your permission, I'd like to post the answers on my web site.

    1. "Ganymede" - Yes, it is the name of one of Jupiter's moons, but it is also a character from Greek mythology. Ganymede was a young boy who was snatched up by an eagle and became the servant of Zeus. In a similar fashion, Project Ganymede snatches a fetus in order to mould it into a servant of an organization whose emblem is the eagle.

    2. "Ambassador from Planet Draconis" - There is or was a person in Nevada who claimed to be an ambassador from the planet Draconis. I believe he even tried to get a highway named after himself. I've changed the name but used the character.

    3. "Richard Chandra lineage" - In the book, Richard Chandra began life as a fetus that was "innoculated" with a substance extracted from alien tissue. The gray substance was composed of nanomachines with the following characteristics:
    - The "scaffolding" of each machine was a fullerene roughly the size of a cell.
    - The fullerene was "doped" (incorporated non-carbon impurities) which created openings or pores of various sizes in the outer structure of the fullerene - allowing molecules of various sizes to filter through to the interior of the machine.
    - Each machine contained a "chemistry set" which could characterize and modify its biochemical environment. Presumably the machines would issue forms of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) to control the development of the nervous system. (Biologists are just beginning to understand how NGF works to architect the nervous system from undifferentiated cells.)
    - Each machine contained a quantum communications channel capable of sending and receiving information.

    The reason why the alien race used the machines was to preserve contact over vast distances.

    The answer to your question, then, is that Richard Chandra is a "re-engineered" human.

    Last year a nanotechnology conference in Austin, Texas laid out a plan for R&D which incorporated all of the features which I proposed in the book (except, of course, a quantum communications channel). The conference did recognize that some form of communications is required with embedded nanomachines, just to get information in and out.

    In the book, the early linkage between Chandra and the innoculated lab rats has the effect of modifying Chandra's psychology in a destabilizing way.

    4. "Hive mentality" - Exactly. This may also be where the human race is headed, given a logical extension of current R&D and the selective pressures on a space-faring species.

    5. "Terminology" - If you are thinking that there are classified code words used in the book that should not be released, I can assure you that is not the case. I provided a complete copy of the manuscript to the security office at a certain intelligence agency prior to publication. They had nine months advance notice to deal with any problems. I have also given the book to several friends in the community--some of whom were security officers. No one ever suggested there was anything that should not be published. No editing or censorship occurred as the result of this review process.

    6. "I'm sure the next book will ponder more questions" - Yup, but a slightly different set. They have to do with the make up of the human mind and brain, our relationship with ourselves, how/if we communicate with God, and the nature of good and evil. The questions also have to do with the role of historic personalities in shaping the collective consciousness. Then again, this is just a rough-and-tumble UFO yarn. ;-)

    Best Regards,

    -- John Morrison

    [This message has been edited by yurisverdlov (edited June 02, 2001).]

    [This message has been edited by yurisverdlov (edited June 02, 2001).]

  4. #4
    SF Author Spacejock's Avatar
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    My novel 'Hal Spacejock' involves a future where many things are familiar. Sure, there are spaceships and hyperspace drives and robots and so on, but people still eat, drink, lie, cheat and steal.

    The planets are earthlike, but with a whole galaxy to settle I would argue that most 'normal' people would choose to live on something familiar rather than a hell-hole like mercury. (I'm talking about the bulk of the population here, not deep-space miners)

    Anyway, I think I avoided any major slipups. Most everyday things speak because voice recognition and synthesis have evolved. There is a single, common language. There is a loose Union of all the planets, but the reader only gets a vague idea of how many planets that might be.

    The novel is really a vehicle for humour, rather than a serious attempt to design and describe a distant future. I was reminded of the folly of over-describing 'invented' tech when I read a book recently which had been writting in the 60's. The author wasted a paragraph on this amazing technology which could scan a car and deduct the road toll from the owner's bank account with an electronic transaction. I know that this tech has been used in several cities for years, and to read the author's enthusiastic description just dated the story for me.

    I'd rather give the gizmo a name and describe what it looks like. I don't need to look under a bonnet to tell you what a motor sounds and feels like from inside the car, and neither should your reader.

    Cheers for now,

    Simon Haynes http://www.spacejock.com

  5. #5
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    Here are more questions from a fan, and answers, relevant to this topic.

    QUESTION:

    One question I do have is ( the issue of linking) Nanotechnology with the functionality of the Internet, and is it something you will write about in your next book? I haven't seen it mentioned in other media, but would be extremely interested in how nanontechnology could be combined with communications. Now, this would be the next level after laser communications for sure.

    -- Michael

    ANSWER:

    The next two books in the trilogy deal broadly with the problem of linking brains with nanomachines and networks, and the potential impact on our culture (and other cultures) when that happens.

    If nanomachines are embedded in tissue, lasers are not a good communications medium, although blue-green lasers do have some penetrating power in a watery environment.

    Lasers are highly directional, whereas a quantum channel (based on quantum entanglement) is associational. The communications device must know where to point a laser in order to communicate with the receiving device; however the location of a quantum-entangled receiver is "known" by the universe. Although some recent experiments by NEC have attempted to combine quantum and laser communications, they wind up with laser limitations imposed on the quantum channel. For this reason I've just used a generic quantum channel in the novel.

    -- John Morrison

  6. #6
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    Here are more questions from a fan, and answers, relevant to this topic.

    QUESTION:

    One question I do have is ( the issue of linking) Nanotechnology with the functionality of the Internet, and is it something you will write about in your next book? I haven't seen it mentioned in other media, but would be extremely interested in how nanontechnology could be combined with communications. Now, this would be the next level after laser communications for sure.

    -- Michael

    ANSWER:

    The next two books in the trilogy deal broadly with the problem of linking brains with nanomachines and networks, and the potential impact on our culture (and other cultures) when that happens.

    If nanomachines are embedded in tissue, lasers are not a good communications medium, although blue-green lasers do have some penetrating power in a watery environment.

    Lasers are highly directional, whereas a quantum channel (based on quantum entanglement) is associational. The communications device must know where to point a laser in order to communicate with the receiving device; however the location of a quantum-entangled receiver is "known" by the universe. Although some recent experiments by NEC have attempted to combine quantum and laser communications, they wind up with laser limitations imposed on the quantum channel. For this reason I've just used a generic quantum channel in the novel.

    -- John Morrison

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