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Thread: Hannibal Lecter

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  1. #1
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    Hannibal Lecter

    How many people consider Hannibal to be part of sci fi? I personally do. His abilities to manipulate people would not work in real life, so I would classify this as sci fi.

  2. #2
    Registered User Loerwyn's Avatar
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    Horror/psychological thriller, sure.

    Sci-Fi/Fantasy? Not in the slightest. There's no sci-fi element to Hannibal at all, he's not "enhanced" in any way.

  3. #3
    @PeteMC666 PeteMC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth2 View Post
    His abilities to manipulate people would not work in real life, so I would classify this as sci fi.
    Oh I don't know, Charles Manson pulled it off. As said, I certainly wouldn't class his character as SF in the slightest.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth2 View Post
    How many people consider Hannibal to be part of sci fi? I personally do. His abilities to manipulate people would not work in real life, so I would classify this as sci fi.
    Not really s.f./f, but I would add him to horror. Some readers don't want to admit non-supernatural works to horror, but I think the first two Lector novels form one argument for doing so.


    Randy M.

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    I wouldn't say he is horror. I didn't find Silence frightening. It was interesting, but not frightening.

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    Registered User Loerwyn's Avatar
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    Just because you didn't find it frightening doesn't mean it's not horror. I doubt most people would find early horror films that scary, but when they came out they were terrifying.

  7. #7
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Horror without a doubt. Silence of the Lambs, at least, has as much of a connection to Science Fiction as does CSI.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth2 View Post
    I wouldn't say he is horror. I didn't find Silence frightening. It was interesting, but not frightening.
    I agree with Loerwyn, and Rob makes a good point.

    If we go strictly by reader reaction, then probably by now Poe's work, Lovecraft's stories and Dracula and Frankenstein are not horror: We've seen it so often, there's nothing there to scare us and if we still read it, we read it for reasons other than, as M. R. James called it, "a pleasing terror."

    But if we classify by the intention that seems implicit in the work and by the structure of the work, all of those are still horror. And I think that's true of Red Dragon and The Silence of the Lambs. For instance, the scenes in Buffalo Bill's cellar and the feel of much of Francis Dolarhyde's conception of the Red Dragon all hark back in the approach to the Gothics and the stories we think of as classic ghost/horror/Gothic stories, I think more so than they do most mystery/detective/crime stories.


    Randy M.

  9. #9
    Registered User Loerwyn's Avatar
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    You can get that vibe with Poe, definitely. Taking The Tell-Tale Heart as a clear example, the pacing of that story builds up tension and this rhythm that keeps pushing you on. In its day it might have been truly horrifying, but now? Not so much, but that pacing still remains. That heart-beat tempo is still thumping beneath the text.

  10. #10
    Does anyone know what the author is up to now? Does he have any intention of returning to the character?

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