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  1. #16
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    I was thinking an ongoing science fiction graphic novel series, but that is accurate.

  2. #17
    Speaks fluent Bawehrf zachariah's Avatar
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    If I were you, I would look at what I have already and ask myself: Where is the story? What is happening right now in your universe that is so interesting you can't look away? Who is doing it, and who or what is trying to stop them? Seek out conflict (and 'conflict' doesn't have to be a physical battle) and follow where it leads. See it through the eyes of individuals and their character will reveal itself to you. Follow them through the events that arise.

  3. #18
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    I'd start with a pilot episode and then move on with the rest.

  4. #19
    Speaks fluent Bawehrf zachariah's Avatar
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    Okay Isaac, do you see how that response might be interpreted as perhaps too broad, and vague? It's a statement of the obvious, like a novelist saying "I'd start with the first chapter and then do chapter two." It tells us nothing about what you're considering, or what you want for your story, so it makes giving any meaningful advice or observation next to impossible.

    Let's imagine you have an idea who the 'hero' characters of your universe are. And you know who the bad guys are. The info in your wiki kind of hints at this. You'd imagine the first chapter, episode, whatever, will introduce your heroes doing whatever it is they usually do - or perhaps shows them meeting each other for the first time - these are the standard scenarios where the reader/viewer learns the basics of your world. But at the same time you've got to show them starting on their great task, or some hint at what the grand arc of your story will be, so you might go with the other tried and tested format of showing the big bad guys being really bad, so we know what our heroes (whoever they may be) are up against.

    But even if you nail that completely, you've then got the rest of the story to tell, and saying it's 'ongoing' is not good enough - I've seen a hundred webcomics start out promisingly and then meander into pointlessness as it becomes clear the author has no idea where the story is actually going (or takes a hundred pages to depict what could have been done in five).

    You can sidestep the story issue if you have great characters, then it becomes more like a strip comic like Peanuts, where you just check in to see what your friends are up to today. It doesn't matter if there's no big story behind it all. But I don't think that's what you're after, so you've really got to knuckle down and sort out in your head what it is you want to tell, and the less outside interference you get, the better. Go forth and write, young man!

  5. #20
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    Character Sketches
    1. Mizzik, an alien beast-like creature from the planet Grear. He traveled beyond Grear for adventure, mayhem a satisfy his curiosity. Became a Mercenary.
    2. Jason Sheridan, human from Earth and a science fiction geek. Mizzik takes him onboard after saving Earth from Dragoth pirates. Turns out he's pretty helpful since science fiction has so much in common with science fact. He's always open minded.
    3. Salena, female aquatic salamander-like alien. Rather nymph-like in personality. Always interested in sex. Like the rest of her people, Salaki, the concept of "taboo" doesn't really apply.
    4. Nellishia, female ungulate-like alien. Peaceful, friendly as many members of the Phylless species. Open minded, a scientist, always looking for a peaceful solution to a conflict.

  6. #21
    Speaks fluent Bawehrf zachariah's Avatar
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    That's great, but you can reel off a hundred of those and have the biggest, most comprehensive wiki ever created, and none of that will actually help you in creating a story that anyone will want to see.

    You want to do a graphic novel, right? So first off, are you illustrating yourself or are you planning on writing the script and finding an artist?

    Second, do you know how to create a standard comic-book format script? There are a ton of online resources on how to do this. Read some scripts from graphic novels you like (not the same as reading the finished product), if you haven't already.

    If you know the nuts and bolts of graphic novel storytelling already, try making a few sample scenes between your characters. Stop telling us what they're like - start showing us some action where these personality traits you've listed come alive. From the above, it sounds like the sequence where Jason joins the aliens is your starting point.

  7. #22
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    It is a team effort, so I'm turning to Towson University for help. And I'll further extend my work online at Academy of Art University.

  8. #23
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    I'm also turning to Dark Horse, if I can.

  9. #24
    Speaks fluent Bawehrf zachariah's Avatar
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    I'll sign off now as it's getting dangerously close to Mithra's Birthday, but it looks like you'll have plenty of people to sound off on what works and what doesn't. I'm still not sure if anything I've said has been useful, so I'll just give one last bit of general adivce which applies to all creative projects: Never bore your audience!

  10. #25
    Pro Bono Graphic Designer virangelus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isaac Law View Post
    I'm also turning to Dark Horse, if I can.
    Dark Horse has to be my favorite comic book firm ^^ You have totally just awakened my innermost Geek! LOL. You know what, the question you have asked is SO general, I'm almost inclined to say that you should seek out a mentor to work under, just so you can learn the ropes.

  11. #26
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    So, any more questions to ask? I'd still like to talk about writing science fiction stories.

  12. #27
    We Read for Light Window Bar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zachariah View Post
    If I were you, I would look at what I have already and ask myself: Where is the story? What is happening right now in your universe that is so interesting you can't look away? Who is doing it, and who or what is trying to stop them? Seek out conflict (and 'conflict' doesn't have to be a physical battle) and follow where it leads. See it through the eyes of individuals and their character will reveal itself to you. Follow them through the events that arise.
    Zachariah is right on. Because the modern novel competes against our vast array of instant-gratification media, an unknown writer must set the hook by commencing at an interesting point of real tension. The old-fashioned method--starting years and years ahead of the focused plot--will no longer serve you well. Yes, novels continue to require a hefty amount of back story and history, but you will be more successful in hooking the reader if you find a way to weave the back story into the plot in small doses, via dialogue or memories, as the tale unfolds.

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