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  1. #91
    Old Fogey Fan RimWorlder's Avatar
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    I did a search on ABE and all but the last title were multiply available; I just did a quick search so most likely all of those titles are to be had through ABE - and most around a buck each.

  2. #92
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    That link doesn't work for some reason.
    OK: I'll try again: THIS LINK.

    Better?

    Also, isn't that, again, a UK web site?
    Yes it is, which is why you should be able to get those books. However I mention it here, not because I use it, but because a lot of our US and Canadian Forumites use it (Aus/NZ too, I think.) With free international shipping it makes their prices quite acceptable, I've been told.

    Mark / Hobbit
    Mark

  3. #93
    free international shipping = major plus

    thanks

  4. #94
    Omnibus Prime Moderator PeterWilliam's Avatar
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    I currently don't read any sci-fi, but have thought that I might like a good space opera. That having been said, what do folks here consider the "must read." For instance, if an uninitiate asked me what book they must read as an introduction to fantasy, I would advise The Lord of the Rings. I don't know if the analogy helps, but I'm looking for an undisputed masterwork(s) of space opera (multi-volume series are more than fine).

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWilliam View Post
    I currently don't read any sci-fi, but have thought that I might like a good space opera. That having been said, what do folks here consider the "must read." For instance, if an uninitiate asked me what book they must read as an introduction to fantasy, I would advise The Lord of the Rings. I don't know if the analogy helps, but I'm looking for an undisputed masterwork(s) of space opera (multi-volume series are more than fine).
    Night Dawn by P. Hamilton (Reality Dysfunction and the sequels)
    The first 3 Culture books by IM Banks - Consider Phelbas, Use of Weapons, Player of Games

    And btw in fantasy the only series I would consider a must is GRRM's ASoIF
    Last edited by suciul; February 5th, 2009 at 12:46 PM.

  6. #96
    ASoIF is what I plan to read next, it's been a long time coming.

    And Iain M. Banks' Culture series is probably the most influencial set I've ever read. I just can't get enough, even though at times his books seem to meander about and not get to a point.

  7. #97
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWilliam View Post
    I currently don't read any sci-fi, but have thought that I might like a good space opera. That having been said, what do folks here consider the "must read." For instance, if an uninitiate asked me what book they must read as an introduction to fantasy, I would advise The Lord of the Rings. I don't know if the analogy helps, but I'm looking for an undisputed masterwork(s) of space opera (multi-volume series are more than fine).
    Dune

    ...not the sequels though.

  8. #98
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    While Dune is often considered a "must read" in SF, I have to point out that it is absolutely not space opera. I'm not sure what is considered the "masterwork" of space opera. (Or was he under the impression that all SF is space opera? It is a specific sub-genre.)

    Much of what used to be called space opera has been updated and refined and is referred to as military science fiction. One of the best writers in that particular sub-genre, in my opinion is David Weber. His Honor Herrington series and his Empire of Man series are both well written and highly entertaining.
    Last edited by JeanneTomlin; February 6th, 2009 at 03:53 AM.

  9. #99
    Registered User Werthead's Avatar
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    The masterworks of space opera are, in my opinion, Peter F. Hamilton's The Night's Dawn Trilogy and Stephen Donaldson's Gap Cycle (which utterly annihilates his Covenant fantasy novels in terms of quality). Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos isn't really a space opera (although The Fall of Hyperion has a lot of space battles) otherwise that would be up there as well.

    Alastair Reynolds' Revelation Space series, particularly the trilogy of Revelation Space, Redemption Ark and Absolution Gap, is also a great work, as is Iain M. Banks Culture books, although they just share a setting, not a continuing narrative. David Brin's Uplift series is also excellent (apart from the first one, which fortunately you can skip without missing anything). I've also heard good things about Neal Asher's work and have Gridlinked sitting on the shelf.

  10. #100
    Quote Originally Posted by JeanneTomlin View Post
    While Dune is often considered a "must read" in SF, I have to point out that it is absolutely not space opera. I'm not sure what is considered the "masterwork" of space opera. (Or was he under the impression that all SF is space opera? It is a specific sub-genre.)

    Much of what used to be called space opera has been updated and refined and is referred to as military science fiction. One of the best writers in that particular sub-genre, in my opinion is David Weber. His Honor Herrington series and his Empire of Man series are both well written and highly entertaining.
    Well... I disagree.

  11. #101
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    It doesn't match any definition I know of for "space opera" since space opera is normally set mainly or entirely in space and centers around conflicts involving space travel(space battles, etc.). But arguing over genre definitions is an exercise in silliness so if you want to consider Dune space opera, go right ahead.

    Edit: You do realize that most reviewers don't consider the appellation a compliment?
    Last edited by JeanneTomlin; February 6th, 2009 at 01:59 PM.

  12. #102
    Space opera, sci-fi, I don't see the terms as derogatory. Some people seem too sensitive. Oh right there's the similarity of the term space opera with soap opera and some people don't like soap operas. Live with it. So much attention paid to image, so little to substance.

  13. #103
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    Nonetheless, and whether you like it or not, when someone refers to a work as space opera they generally aren't trying to be nice.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bond View Post
    Space opera, sci-fi, I don't see the terms as derogatory. Some people seem too sensitive. Oh right there's the similarity of the term space opera with soap opera and some people don't like soap operas. Live with it. So much attention paid to image, so little to substance.
    Last edited by JeanneTomlin; February 6th, 2009 at 03:24 PM.

  14. #104
    \m/ BEER \m/ Moderator Rob B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeanneTomlin View Post
    Nonetheless, and whether you like it or not, when someone refers to a work as space opera they generally aren't trying to be nice.
    I think that trend has changed in the past couple of years, with writers like the "New British Space Opera" writers like Alastair Reynolds, Ken Macloed, Charles Stross, Peter F. Hamilton, and Stephen Baxter receiving critical acclaim and awards.

    Still, before reading this thread, I've never seen anybody refer to Dune as Space Opera.

  15. #105
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    There is a lot of what might be considered space opera that I like. I think I mentioned liking David Weber's work which could easily be classed in that group as well as Elizabeth Moon's Vatta series.

    I'm not too worried about what people call it but I do think if you go looking for space ship adventure in Dune you will be disappointed.

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