Page 3 of 30 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 436
  1. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    140
    Shadow Moon by Lucas and Claremont

    Never go into Willow so that might have hurt this. I was really ready for this George Lucas and favorite X_Scribe Chris Claremont, never got to page 20....

  2. #32
    Registered as What?
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    The Breadbasket-Boy! I do feel yeasty!
    Posts
    1,160
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbry
    Shadow Moon by Lucas and Claremont

    Never go into Willow so that might have hurt this. I was really ready for this George Lucas and favorite X_Scribe Chris Claremont, never got to page 20....
    While I liked the movie, Willow , I thought that this book was just plain boring. I,too, didn't get very far into the novel.

  3. #33
    Black Rimmersman
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by Archmage
    I completely agree with you about Jordan...Except I will take it a step further...basically just about everything after book 6 has been completely off course and unneccessary. I am just hoping Jordan finds his way back to his original plot and that the saga ends as well as it began.

    I completely disagree with you about Fool's Fate by Hobb. I found the entire saga, The Farseer Trilogy and The Tawny Man Trilogy, to be outstanding. I look at it as one saga, although it is broken up into two seperate trilogies. It is one of my all time favorite sagas.

    Peace
    *SPOILER FOR ROBIN HOBB* do not read if you have not finished the last book!

    I loved the Farseer Trilogy, Liveship Books and Tawny Man trilogy. It was just the ending of Fool's Fate. That last two chapters. (Without giving anything away) She really did not resolve the big character dynamic... and the death of you-know-who was only done to give her an easy way out and allow *blank* to be with *blank*.

    Did you understand any of that?

    Best,
    Joe
    Last edited by Ingen_Jegger; July 26th, 2004 at 07:30 PM. Reason: spoiler potential

  4. #34
    Lemurs!!! Moderator Erfael's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Up a tree
    Posts
    4,880
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingen_Jegger
    I loved the Farseer Trilogy, Liveship Books and Tawny Man trilogy. It was just the ending of Fool's Fate. That last two chapters. (Without giving anything away) She really did not resolve the big character dynamic... and the death of you-know-who was only done to give her an easy way out and allow *blank* to be with *blank*.

    Did you understand any of that?

    Best,
    Joe

    Just to be nice to people, a nice big spoiler warning may be in order here.

  5. #35
    Black Rimmersman
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by Erfael
    Just to be nice to people, a nice big spoiler warning may be in order here.

    I tried to be a cryptic as possible, but I threw a spoiler warning in there just in case. Thanks.

  6. #36
    Archmage
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingen_Jegger
    *SPOILER FOR ROBIN HOBB* do not read if you have not finished the last book!

    I loved the Farseer Trilogy, Liveship Books and Tawny Man trilogy. It was just the ending of Fool's Fate. That last two chapters. (Without giving anything away) She really did not resolve the big character dynamic... and the death of you-know-who was only done to give her an easy way out and allow *blank* to be with *blank*.

    Did you understand any of that?

    Best,
    Joe
    SPOILER WARNING

    I think she resolved it quite well. In the end, Burrich was Burrich. He showed strength, and conviction, and love, for his children, for his wife, and for Fitz. In the end, he embraced that about himself which he rejected and hated, to save his son. Just as he did when he pulled Fitz out of the grave and brought him back to his body from Nighteyes. That resolved his biggest character dynamic and expressed his greatest strength. That because of love, he was able to push aside what he despised, to help those that he loved. Burrich, ever the protector, ended as the protector. I think the resolution is evident.

  7. #37
    Registered User magze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    united kingdom
    Posts
    487
    I agree its great that everyone has different views on books i have to admit i have enjoyed the Sword of Truth series except the last two ,Pillars of Creation and Naked Empire but i seem to be in the minority

  8. #38
    I like what I like... Richardb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    1,092
    I have tried the first three Goodkind novels and... blech. Awful stuff.
    Janny Wurtz novels are just awful (not the Empire, those are great).
    War of the Flowers was abysmal, the antidote for goodness...
    Lord of the Isles... god's I get a hairball just thinking on it
    Sara Douglass novels (I've tried several, so I have to generalize) are like a nice anestesia if you want to numb your brain.

    But that's just me. All popular books, I know, and popular authors.

  9. #39
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    2,059
    Quote Originally Posted by Jasc
    The #1 award for “Most Appalling Fantasy Book Ever Written” and for the Most “Appalling Fantasy Author” would have to go, unequivocally, to Robert Stanek’s Keeper Martin’s Tale. You ain't seen bad baby, till you plow through his putrid prose.
    Someone at Amazon posted a fantasy list and raved about Stanek. I found some excerpts on line and was really glad they were there; saved me some money.

    Made me wonder why some good writers I know say it's hard to get published.

  10. #40
    Registered as What?
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    The Breadbasket-Boy! I do feel yeasty!
    Posts
    1,160
    Quote Originally Posted by AuntiePam
    Someone at Amazon posted a fantasy list and raved about Stanek. I found some excerpts on line and was really glad they were there; saved me some money.

    Made me wonder why some good writers I know say it's hard to get published.
    Supposedly Stanek is the one who wrote all those rave reviews.

  11. #41
    Cranky old broad AuntiePam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    2,059
    That explains it.

  12. #42
    Black Rimmersman
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by Archmage
    SPOILER WARNING

    I think she resolved it quite well. In the end, Burrich was Burrich. He showed strength, and conviction, and love, for his children, for his wife, and for Fitz. In the end, he embraced that about himself which he rejected and hated, to save his son. Just as he did when he pulled Fitz out of the grave and brought him back to his body from Nighteyes. That resolved his biggest character dynamic and expressed his greatest strength. That because of love, he was able to push aside what he despised, to help those that he loved. Burrich, ever the protector, ended as the protector. I think the resolution is evident.

    SPOILER!!!

    I think Burrich died more to allow Robin Hobb a way to have Fitz go back with Molly without confrontation, a move done to side-step the dynamic between Fitz and the Fool that had gone on for all 9 books. She really did not deal with the love between them at all. One moment the whole series revolved around it, the next it was like "we are different, goodbye forever". and the book ended. Not a very good resolution in my mind to a fantastic series and great ongoing conflict.

    Best,
    Joe

  13. #43
    Long Time Reader Firebrand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    First Time Poster
    Posts
    38
    Personally I liked Runelords, yes the magic was kinda weak, but I spent most of my time visualizing the endowment agumented battles, which must have been insane, more of a comic book kinda thing then normal fantasy lit. Also I mean it WAS inspired by a hallucination.

    as for douglas, you can't blame her for the hades daughter plot, its just a stolen revamped version of troy, I liked her book under the hanging wall, the wayfarer redemption was allright but it fell off badly after the first book, and I'm still not sure what ordinary avar look like...

  14. #44
    Lemurs!!! Moderator Erfael's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Up a tree
    Posts
    4,880
    Quote Originally Posted by Firebrand
    Personally I liked Runelords, yes the magic was kinda weak
    I thought the magic was the single most interesting things about these books. There were a great many ethical questions that had to be dealt with in regards to endowments and the liege/follower relationship. For once a magic system that had long-standing repercussions, not just an endless fount of power that users could tap.

  15. #45
    Oi Memnoch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Boston MA (from Sydney Aus)
    Posts
    56
    This is easy...Dance of Demons without a shadow of a doubt. And they say bad things about Ed Greenwood...wait till you see this one.

    Let me tell you - Gary Gygax definitely created the uber-munchkin concept with the culmination of his central character, Gord the Rogue, first introduced in Saga of Old City and Artifact of Ultimate Evil (I'll skip the descriptives for Gord and his cohorts as I'm assuming that if you've managed to get this far you know who they all are). Elminster seriously looks like a shrimp compared to this guy. At this stage of the saga (I think there are seven books ahead of it) Gord's still human (using that term very loosely), but he's got about a zillion innate powers and godlike abilities.

    In one sequence he kills about two THOUSAND demons (I kid you NOT) by himself, while his partner (also human) kills another two thousand. All this happens in one encounter.

    In another one he faces off with the Reaper, Nerull, Lord of Hades, also known as Infestix, also known as the supreme leader of the yugoloths (daemons) and kicks his ass.

    Did I say that Gord, at this stage, is not even thirty years old?

    Dance of Demons has to be the WORST book I've ever read - Gary, who is rightly regarded as the father of D&D, must've gone completely dry on ideas and penned this for the money. His former narrative brilliance, so much in evidence in Saga of Old City and Artifact of Ultimate Evil, raised hopes that he was one of the few D&D writers who could stand among the contemporary fantasy crowd (or to a young - at the time - muppet like myself, he seemed like one, anyway). But this book is a shocker. No suspense, no twists, nothing but Super-Gord cutting a swathe through every single thing. It's D&D munchkinism at its absolute worst.

    Gord is now the Champion of Balance (Good and Evil are BOTH undesirable) and is IMPERVIOUS to defeat and demon lords like Graz'zt, Demogorgon, Mandrillagon and Orcus, as well as daemonkings like Anthraxus and Infestix, and the Dukes Infernal (Asmodeus and Co.) quail before his relentless onslaught. And YES, as I said before, he's still human.

    And just what exactly can Super-Gord do? (Don't worry, these aren't spoilers as they are revealed in the first five pages of the book.) Well, he can communicate by telepathy. He can move to any place with a thought. He can drop off other wizards' radar and do the stealth bomber thing. His armor is lighter than air. He has a magic ring which when worn makes it impossible for anyone to hurt him either physically or magically. Since he supposed to be a thief, he has these special gloves which allow him to fall any distance and land like a cat (ie fly downwards). Oh, and he wields Courflamme, the Mighty Sword of Neutrality, which has the ability to kill thousands of demons with a thought.

    Here are some excerpts of one of his battles in the Abyss that will have you rolling on the floor.

    "Gord raised the diamond-bright part of Courflamme, aiming at the demon's outthrust head. The sword's tip suddenly spat forth a black bolt of force. The crackling ebon dart sheared off the top of the fiend's head, and the impact of it actually flipped the demon's massive body over in a somersault.

    Without pausing to view his work, Gord turned and faced his next foe, now aiming the long blade as if it were a wand. Again the inky core of the weapon sent forth a blast of dark power, and another of the charging demons died. It became almost mechanical thereafter: Gord pointed the blade, willed destruction, and again another monstrous beast crashed down dead. Again, again, yet again. Soon a half-circle of twitching demon corpses formed a barrier in front of him, a wall so great that the young champion could see nothing but its stinking height."

    And if that's not enough for you, Gellor, his sidekick, has certainly grown from being that raspcallion guardian of Gord's from the first couple of books. Here's an example of what he's like in combat with demons:

    "Gellor brought forth his ivory kanteel, adjusted one of the golden pegs, and gently stroked the silver strings of the little harp. A ripple of beautiful notes washed outward, and the demon-beasts reacted as if they had been struck by a tidal wave.

    When the sounds from the enchanted strings of the instrument struck, fully a dozen of the massive monsters were bowled over, while a half-hundred of the lesser scavengers were blown away, some actually torn to pieces in the process."

    And here's a final excerpt to blow you away (literally):

    "Side by side, the two heroes strode across the endless leagues of the foul layer that was the entry to the Abyss. In a short time, thanks to their innate force, they came to the towering bluffs that housed the gateways to the next twenty tiers of the agglomeration of planes that formed the depth of evil called demonrealm, the Abyss. A few hundred lesser demons were there to contest their entry, prevent them from going on, but those malign guards died in vain, swiftly and without great effort from the pair. A clear and bright melody from the kanteel, some dark and deadly lightnings from the rejoined sword, Courflamme, and none stood to oppose them."

    The lobotomy is complementary, of course.

    Oh, and a special note to Gary's lawyers should they decide to chase me - this is just an opinion!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •