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Thread: Reading Aloud

  1. #1
    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
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    Reading Aloud

    Okay, so this is a bit of a selfish thread, but it may be interesting anyway. When you go to a reading by an author, what types of chapters do you prefer to hear: Descriptive chapters, action scenes such as battle scenes or chapters where magic is manifested, highly thoughtful situations that are introspective and filled with contemplative issues, or chapters with many characters and lots of dialogue?

    If I left out any other preferences, please state them. It's often very hard to decide what to read aloud to people who are unfamiliar with your books and your world. What do you think would leave the most lasting impression?

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    MJ Dusseault Spears&Buckler's Avatar
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    I've actually never been to an author's read before. I don't mean to change the subject, but how do you find out about things like that going on?

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    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
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    I guess it depends upon where you live. If you live in NYC then New York Magazine, The Village Voice and Time Out NY all list the scheduled readings. At all the conventions authors read as well, so if there is a con in your town you can most probably go and listen. Barnes and Noble and Borders also conduct readings periodically. You can check you local bookstores as well.

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    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
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    Those are all givens, Steve!!! What I want to know is what people really and truly enjoy hearing. I am usually bored stiff when I go to a reading. I don't want to bore my audience, but different strokes for different folks. What I might find interesting, another may fall asleep to.

  5. #5
    Where have I been? Moderator JRMurdock's Avatar
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    What I DON'T like:

    1) Being read to.
    2) monotone
    3) Being read to.
    4) a boring reader.
    5) Being read to.
    6) Imobile readers
    7) Being read to.

    What I DO like:
    1) A mix of description and Action.
    2) An author enthusatic about his/her work and getting the audience worked up as well.
    3) A reader who spends more time talking with the audience rather than reading (practice practice practice and memorize your piece so you don't really need to read, but can use the book as a prop).
    4) A reader who doesn't look like he/she is actually reading, but talking directory the audience.
    5) Inflection
    6) Appropriate pause.
    7) Meter (pacing)
    8) Movement by the reader. Flailing arms. Mock action. Shouting. Jumping. Get into the story man!
    9) I want to FEEL the story, not just be read to.

    Does that help at all?

  6. #6
    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
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    Yes, it all helps. I have to wade through 2400 pages of text and pick out a 20 minute section, so everything helps.
    I tend to get too serious when most people at the readings simply want to be entertained. Too much dialogue in the chapter makes for a tedious read - "he said," "she replied", "he exclaimed" etc. But on the other hand, I want to read or hear, when I go to a reading, something that is indicative of the author. If the chapter's too heavy, then it gets boring, and if it's all action, then the person listening will get the wrong impression of my books. I have been doing sample readings this year to various small groups in NYC and testing out different chapters. I know what I would prefer to read, but I won't do that - I'd probably put the audience to sleep - too philosophical and too hard to listen to.
    But, Maus, I only read. I am not a very good actor, and I am not terribly animated when I read. I have a good speaking voice, as I teach yoga and my voice is soothing and easy to listen to. But I hope the words themselves generate the ambiance and create the images because I kind of hold the pages pretty tighlty with my hands and don't often use them as I speak.
    You can't please everyone. Some people are very moved by sad chapters and serious chapters, and some people want fighting and magic. It's often hard to pick out a chapter that will make sense so out of context, that combines what everyone wants. But, it's really good to know what people hate! And it helps to know what they prefer.

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    Anitaverse Refugee FicusFan's Avatar
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    I just came back from Worldcon and went to a bunch of author readings. You can also find them at local cons.

    I usually only go to the readings of authors I know and am already reading. I should use it to find new authors - but I have no patience at being read to about something I know nothing about.

    I don't mind if the work is in progress or already out. Though I know it is easier to sell something that exists.

    What I don't like is when they read small snippets from various parts of the work. I want them to start at the beginning and continue until the reading is done, not jump from pillar to post. You aren't really trying to highlight your writing skills for the audience so much as you are trying to tell a story and build a connection. If you do it well enough they will buy the book when you are done because they care about what happens next. No amount of technical razzle dazzle will make them buy the book if they didn't like/care/find interesting the story/characters.

    I don't care much for a lot of names in the material being read. Usually they are fancy and funky and I need to see them in writitng to understand them.

    I also don't like being yelled at. I went to a reading once and the author was also a theater actor. It was a small intimate setting: a couple of rows of seats in the bookstore, and he was projecting as if he was on the stage. I was in the front row and stopped listening and couldn't wait for him to shut up.

    Also mumbling is not good. You can also tell when they are afraid because you can hear their chest cavity tightening up with every breath they take. It distracts from what you are hearing in terms of the story, because you are waiting to see if the author is going to keel over.

    Reading something funny is always good and helps keep the author's name in your mind.

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    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
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    Ficus, I agree with just about everything you said. The only exception is that if the author attempts to be funny and fails at it, then the effect in a small room can be really bad.

    It's hard to tell a story in one chapter whatever the subject matter. Epic fantasy, due to its customary length, poses an even greater challenge in that regard. Picking the right chapter to read is so important, and I totally agree that skipping around from chapter to chapter is not a good idea. Lots of difficult names is definitely something to avoid when reading aloud.

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    Under construction Jamza1986's Avatar
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    lol do authors have to read it out loud? I'd dread that

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    Fulgurous Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    As someone who has had to sit through a number of readings whether I wanted to or not, here's what I would suggest:

    Do two excerpts of ten-fifteen minutes long, no longer. While Ficus makes an excellent point about snippets, a long twenty minute read is going to put most listeners to sleep even if they like the work.

    Set up each excerpt with a brief but clear explanation of where it fits in the story, who the people are, even if you're reading from the very beginning of the work.

    Pick at least one excerpt with some strong visual action and dialogue exchange that is dramatic. Pick at least one section for one of the excerpts that involves exposition from a main character's point of view, that character's thoughts, perhaps as he or she makes a realization or self-discovery. Think King Arthur's monologue when he's found out about Guenivere and Lancelot's romance in the musical "Camelot." (If you don't know it, rent the film with Richard Harris doing it as King Arthur.) At least part of one excerpt should have something humorous to it. You want to let listeners know that your writing is fun and exciting (the action and dialogue, humor) and also has depth (the character development.) Imagery description is a plus but shouldn't be the be-all, end-all.

    You don't have to be a theater actor, but you do have to be a radio actor. You have to use your voice. Jim Dale does the audio version of the Harry Potter books and he's wonderful -- and I say that as someone who cannot get into audio versions. He has a sonorous voice, like you say you have. If you can listen to him, see how he does the different voices and the pauses and such, it should be moderately easy to imitate as a style. Imagine the audience to be young children and you'll find that you lapse into a more exaggerated, rhythmic storyteller style automatically.

    In between the excerpts, talk briefly about how you came to write the story, what's important about it to you, why you think it's of interest to them, more explanatory details about character and plot. Leave enough time in the presentation at the end for people to ask questions.

    Make sure there are really good snacks and enough to drink. Have a promotional item with the book's title like bookmarks, pins or pens available for peope to take even if they don't buy the book.

    Chat up and be really nice to the bookstore folk or whoever is running the reading and try to make sure that the person who introduces you has actually read the book.

  11. #11
    Edited for submission Holbrook's Avatar
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    Never done a reading, but have given lectures/talks.

    From experience; Always make sure you are comfortable, both in clothing, and the position you are standing or sitting in. Sounds stupid, but if you don't feel relaxed and sure of yourself it shows. You lose the attention of your audience if you are not able to give them all yours and that is what you are trying to do in a way, hold them, make them listen. If they see you are relaxed in their company (well look it) it gets you off to a good start.

    Find something to do with your hands, if reading hold a book. Hands are horrible things if left to their own devices when talking.

    Practice what you are going to say/read/talk about. In front of a mirror. Yes that sounds very vain, but you notice things you do while you are talking, things you don't even know you are doing. especially the hands *grin*

    Keep your eyes on the whole of your audience, That is try and fix your gaze over them or on a fixed spot. I don't mean glare, Don't single out a single person, especially if it is in a small room, you make them feel uncomfortable and others notice it. On the other hand if you notice a friend at the beginning a smile and a nod makes you and your audience feel closer, for want of a better word. It makes you real to them.

    Never look at your feet or hands or on the fool in the first row picking their nose. It gives the impression you are not interested in doing this and people will lose interest in you. The nose picker or like can make you freeze and lose your pace.

    Highs and lows, build your talk taking your listeners up, then down, then up again. With a section of work I would chose something that leaves the audience asking "what is next?"

    Make sure you know that section backwards and forwards, if you are answering questions after make sure you have a good set of answers. Draw them up if you can, cover as many bases as you can. With it being your book it should be easier. Nothing worse than some one going... eeerrrrr yes.... good question. It screams they haven't got a clue.

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    The Doctor... Sammie's Avatar
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    This is a really interesting thread - there's loads of good advice here, for all sorts of public speaking.

    My only contrinution would be - make sure you have a glass of water (plus jug) on hand! Mouth's have a tendancy to go dry at the worst possible moments. Also, taking a sip of water is a great way of buying yourself a moment to collect your thoughts if you get stage-fright or are asked that really HORRIBLE question. (But don't reach for the water without looking, when you are already jittery with nerves, and send it flying! - Haven't done this during my own presentation, but did it during a friend's, while waiting for my turn! )

    Nothing worse than some one going... eeerrrrr yes.... good question. It screams they haven't got a clue.
    True. And yet confidently saying "That is a very good question", or even better a very interesting question, as if you are commending the questioner and are quite certain of the answer yourself, is another useful time-buying skill.

    Specific to the reading - my feeling would be that it's advisable to start with action/drama (to get our attention) and finish with the same (so's to provide that cliffhanger/keep us wanting more). Then sandwich the sad/serious/emotional piece in the middle. Either way, remember people will remember everything they REALLY like (or don't, but hopefully that wont be an issue!), but besides that, they will mainly remember the begining and the end....

  13. #13
    GemQuest Moderator Gary Wassner's Avatar
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    The last two readings I did I chose totally different types of chapters. One was sad but was very descriptive. It also had a good action segment in the middle of it. The other was less vibrant and much more contemplative. Some people in the audience thought it was brilliant, and they loved the imagery. From my perspective, I felt that it was too long and too serious as I was reading it!! I don't know why I didn't realize that before hand. I decided on that chapter about an hour before the reading, and I discarded all of my other choices at the last minute.
    I try to keep my readings to 20 minutes. More than that, I agree, people wander no matter how interesting the book. But I have never read more than one chapter during a reading. It's hard to find a chapter that is cohesive and that short that it would take only ten minutes to read! That's like 7 or eight pages! I don't have any chapters that are only 7 or 8 pages.

    I am also beginning the reading at World Fantasy this year with a poem. It's short enough so that it will not alienate the audience, but it is important to me. My books have more and more poetry in them as the series progresses. It sets a mood in this case, and leads into the chapter I am planning on reading very well.

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    Thumbs up I LOVE to read aloud!

    But I think I am the exception rather than the rule amongst the other writers I know. I did an appearance with Raymond Fiest & he doesn't read aloud - just takes questions and answers from the audience - so I was asked to read first! Was I nervous in front of 50 or so Fiest fans? Just a tad! (Checkout the full garlicky story on my website if you fancy a chuckle: www.millerlau.com)

    I do rehearse my readings. I can't imagine why some others do not... Maus, I completely agree with you about the monotone thing - ruins the reading.

    To be honest I have found that people are beginning to fidget round about the 10 minute mark (and that's not just my reading, honest! I've observed the same at cons even with the big names). I would probably never read for more than 20 minutes at a push.

    Surprisingly, many writers do not rehearse or even think about the reading until about 10 mins beforehand. And (sorry - pet peeve coming up!) many of my male counterparts don't seem to think they even need to look tidy!
    Personally, I think that's unprofessional. No, we are not on a fashion parade but I would be less inclined to buy a book by someone I could not take seriously... I guess I'm saying it all goes towards your credibility...
    (I hope I'm not offending anyone here - it IS only my take on it.)

    A tip I was given by my fave mega-star! Was that, in order to stop your throat from tightening and making your voice squeaky and nervous sounding, is to suck a boiled sweet - or eat anything in fact - this sends a chemical message to your brain which stops it from producing the 'fear/flight' endorphines. Your brain 'thinks' (subconciously) that if you are eating - you are NOT in fact under threat...

    Hmm, I'm thinking: A101 Presentation Skills For Authors. Now that would be worth doing...

    Anyway - sorry for waffling on distracting myself from editing...

    Hugs
    Funky

  15. #15
    Registered User Leiali's Avatar
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    I have been to a fair few readings, and the ones that stick out in my mind are the ones where the speaker has been funny, telling anecdotes relevant to their work. The weird thing is, though I prefer the authors Phillip Pullman and Robin Hobb to Jasper Fforde and David Gemmell, Fforde and Gemmell were by far and away better at readings because they were comfortable telling a story out load. They were engaging, interesting, relaxed and fun. Hobb and Pullman were both very dry, and though interesting, a little dull at times as they were not natural speakers. Hobb especially seemed terrified - fair enough I know, but she was amongst people who had clearly bought all of her considerable number of books. So anyway, relax and have fun!

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