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  1. #16
    Registered User msmosser's Avatar
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    I have been reading them in the order they were published. I have read the silvercall and iron tower series so far. I have all the others, but have not got around to reading them yet. I like what I have read so far.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Serq
    Cymric, I've read his "Once Upon a Winter's Night", which was set in Mithgar. I'd never heard of him before that and the only reason I bought the book was because the hero had the same name as my boyfriend at the time - Alain.

    It was a light read, but I enjoyed it.
    Once Upon a Winter's Night is an updated version of Norse/Swedish fairytales, not a part of the Mithgar series. The last proposed book in the series is Red Slippers which was published last year.

  3. #18
    KatG I don't know you, but I must say you seem very intelligent and I agree whole heartedly with your opinions in this thread.

    I think McKiernan gets a bad rap from alot of people that is not deserved. I read his Iron Tower and silver call series years ago and have recently re-read them and enjoyed them. I think he is a very good author and I have enjoyed his other books too.

    I also agree with Estanghero, Dragondoom is the best of his books.

  4. #19
    Fulgurous Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    ValleyGirl? What do I usually sound like, Eliza Doolittle?

    "Dragondoom" sounds interesting, but I want to check out the Mithgar series particularly. I'm mostly just trying to keep up with the field, so we'll see if I like him or not. If I sort of like a Mithgar title, I might try a non-Mithgar book of his. I don't for instance particularly like Brook's Shanara series but do like some other works he's written. Of course, by the time I get around to McKernian on my reading list, he may have moved on to many other things, but I try anyway.

    Thanks for the compliment Grawgos!

  5. #20
    Leisure time optimizer Moderator Nimea's Avatar
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    KatG,
    but Dragondoom is a Mithgar book. Or did I misunderstand you?

    I think I said so before in all the other threads about McKiernan: I liked part of his books, and some I thought were bad.

    Let's take a look at the Mithgar books in the chronological order (which is not the way I read them):

    The Dragonstone - did not particularly like it; in fact found it boring and had to work to finish it
    The Voyage of the Fox Rider - just like Dragonstone; did so not enjoy it (read it after Dragonstone)
    Hel's Crucible duology - this is the last stuff I read by him and I did not found it that great; it did not grip me very much;
    Dragondoom - a bittersweet story that kept me awake and made me cry; I read it many years ago and the German translation, but I still remember it to be really good
    Tales from the one-eyed Crow: The Vulgmaster - did not read it in this version because I never bothered to get the graphic novel
    Tales of Mithgar - I really liked this story collection! The Vulgmaster is in here. I liked how he filled Mithgar with even more life (and until then I had only known The Iron Tower and Dragondoom)
    The Iron Tower trilogy - the first books I read; enjoyed them greatly; again, this was so many years ago but I still remember how it had affected me and how much I liked it
    Silver Call duology - I think I send out my sister (who was staying some month in London) to get them for me and she had to search quite a while; I liked the story mostly but had problems with the writing and how the story was told - and at that time I was still thrilled by the overall story McKiernan was doing with his Mithgar books
    The Eye of the Hunter - Now this one is also one I loved; it goes on telling a story that was started in Tales of Mithgar; it has the best cast of characters, or at least that's how I remember it
    Silver Wolf, Black Falcon - have it but did not read it yet; I am curious and want to know how he ends his story arc but since the last books I read weren't that great I am rather reluctant to pick it up
    Red Slippers - did not get it so far, but might do so since I have high hopes for his short stories

    About McKiernan and his 'ripping-off': I commented on this on other threads. I think he makes it clear enough in his forwords (esp. to Iron Tower) why he does it and that's not a bad thing. And I really like his story arc that goes through all the books. If he only wrote good constistently ...

    Eh, well, that's what I have to say about him.

  6. #21
    Registered User Serq's Avatar
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    Posted by LordGrimm
    Once Upon a Winter's Night is an updated version of Norse/Swedish fairytales, not a part of the Mithgar series. The last proposed book in the series is Red Slippers which was published last year.
    You're absolutely right about that. Sorry for the error.

  7. #22
    Registered User drw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nimea
    The Eye of the Hunter - Now this one is also one I loved; it goes on telling a story that was started in Tales of Mithgar; it has the best cast of characters, or at least that's how I remember it
    So here is my question. Can I just jump into The Eye of the Hunter, or should I read the Tales of Mithgar story first? I assume the novel is stand-alone, but would it be a better story or more easily understood if I start with the short?

    KatG. Maybe Eliza Doolittle in reverse! I happen to agree with Grawgos and enjoy your replies (particularly in the writing forum). In that particular sentence, you just seemed to.. babble!.. for awhile! Maybe I'm overly tired, but I got a laugh out of it.

    DRW

  8. #23
    drw, I have not read Tales of Mithgar, but I have read Eye of the Hunter and enjoyed it very much. Reading Tales would probably make it better, but I don't think it is a nessecity.

  9. #24
    Administrator Administrator Hobbit's Avatar
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    Late to the party..... (thanks for the reference, HE, but msmosser beat me to it...thank you for the link!)

    I've got to say that actually I haven't read much McKiernan at all. His books are only available on import in the UK, so I haven't actually had any until recently. I have got recently some second hand copies but haven't got round to reading them properly yet. I've dipped into them, but little more than that so far. As Nimea says, he does admit to Tolkien references and as I understand it (and as you've said above) becomes a little more independent later.

    I've never rushed out to buy them before as I've tended to see them as 'Tolkien-light'/lite, though until I've actually sat down and read a few I can't really comment further. Having said that, what's been said above has encouraged me to move them a little nearer to the top of the pile.

    Hobbit
    Mark

  10. #25
    Fulgurous Moderator KatG's Avatar
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    Well I'm ill, drw, and on medication, so I'm allowed to babble.

    I thought you guys said that "Dragondoom" was a standalone not in the Mithgar series? Or maybe I just misunderstood. Anyway, thanks for the suggestions, Nimea. I think I'll look at the story descripts and see which one most calls me, maybe.

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by KatG
    Well I'm ill, drw, and on medication, so I'm allowed to babble.

    I thought you guys said that "Dragondoom" was a standalone not in the Mithgar series? Or maybe I just misunderstood. Anyway, thanks for the suggestions, Nimea. I think I'll look at the story descripts and see which one most calls me, maybe.
    Dragondoom is part of Mithgar, rather it is the "Once upon a Winter's night" that is not part of Mithgar.

    Mckiernan books are generally stand alone, even being part of a larger whole. The first book I read in the series was Eye of the Hunter and for awhile, it was the only one I read (read one paperback into dust).

  12. #27
    Leisure time optimizer Moderator Nimea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drw
    So here is my question. Can I just jump into The Eye of the Hunter, or should I read the Tales of Mithgar story first? I assume the novel is stand-alone, but would it be a better story or more easily understood if I start with the short?
    You don't have to read that story first . . . as far as I remember. I did so by incident and was rather excited when I found out that this story had a sequel novel.

    To get the whole story-arc one would think it might be best to read all the books in the chronological order - then again, from my own experience: I would have stopped before the good bits. And really since those books are really stand-alones it is easy to just grab what interests one most. You can always go on from there. It is really nice to explore Mithgar like that, too.

    So, KatG, I hope you will tell us what you chose and what you think about it?

  13. #28
    cynical master of time Cymric's Avatar
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    I tried reading the hel's crucible duology and got bored really quick. It seemed like the author spent alot of time educating his readers about his world thru the characters education of the events taking place. This while sometimes an effective tool in writing can become boring after 31 pages.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Spears&Buckler View Post
    McKiernan is nothing but a blatant ripoff of Tolkien. If you've read The Lord of the Rings, there is no need to waste your time with McKiernan.
    IF you read the fowards in his books he acknowledges that he tooks some inspiration from Tolkien, but the characters, plots, and storylines are completely different. Warrows and Hobbits are no alike at all...other that being small....anyways...

    I would Start with the Hels Crucible Duology.....there are many things referanced in this book that will help you understand many things that are happening in other novels......

    You could also start with Tales from Mithgar...this book is actually a collection of short stories that will give you a taste of his style, characters, and the world of Mithgar itself...if you like this book you will love the others.

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