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  1. #16
    Books of Pellinor alison's Avatar
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    Yes, I'm impressed with the blind typing too, Gary! I'm not quite your classic touch typist, if I did that my writing would be most avant garde

    I find your comments about a shape interesting. I think I understand what you are saying, but it is hard for me to fully comprehend. Are you saying that the emotional ending to the book is your true target, and not neccessarily the storyline events that comprise it?
    Hi Richard - it's a bit hard to talk about, isn't it? I'm trying to describe intuitive things that aren't really graspable in words, that happen while I'm previsioning a book. The actual writing is really where it all happens for me. But re your question: it's fair to say that yes, I'm going for a particular emotional place in the work, and that is probably my primary objective; it's certainly the aspect I feel most clear about. But the story is the means by which I do it. So both things are very hard to separate from each other.

  2. #17
    Registered User tuttle's Avatar
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    Hi Alison,

    It is difficult to describe the creative process, but interesting to talk about. I have two very talented daughters who process information in drastically different ways, yet they both manage to get to the same conclusion. The whole process of creating something intriques me, but when I try to describe how I do it, it appears so stiff and structural that one might think it could be automated.

    As I delve into the process of creating the next book, I will think about your shapes and see if I can visualize what you have described. It should be fun

  3. #18
    Books of Pellinor alison's Avatar
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    I spend an awful lot of time thinking about what the process is, I'm afraid (it's probably another vice). I am very fascinated by how artists work, what is in common and what isn't. Maybe the only thing in common is that you end up with something - a piece of writing, a performance, a painting, whatever - at the end of it! But you're right, Richard, it's very hard to put into words. When you talk about "mood", I think about "smell" - sometimes it's like I get a sniff of whatever it is, and just have to put my nose down and go for it. But it sounds kind of the same!

    Do you have rituals? (Now this is probably getting personal!)

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    Hello

    I was fascinated by your thoughts about maps. I wonder, did you start writing your first novel and realize that you needed a map to better get the movements in your world or did you make a map to keep everything straight after you started writing?

    My problem with maps, I can't draw, but I found I could not go beyond chapter three without it.

    By the way, since Allison will probably read this response, let me ask you both this question.

    First, I have written a trilogy, book 3 is nealry complete. I need to do the full re-reads of all three and the general tightening up of everything and then I am going to try and tackle the publishing aspects.

    What do you both recomend, that I try to find a publisher or that I try to find an agent?

    I have been writing all my life, but have NO writing credits to my name. These are my first books.

  5. #20
    Registered User tuttle's Avatar
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    Hi Alison,

    Quote Originally Posted by alison
    Do you have rituals? (Now this is probably getting personal!)
    Rituals? Thank goodness, no.

    Interestingly, I have spent no time trying to understand the process, but this discussion with you may change that. I am very organized with my writing, probably due to my background in creating computer systems, but I have never tried to analyze why I write the way I do. Perhaps some reflection on that is in order.

  6. #21
    Registered User tuttle's Avatar
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    Hi Chris,

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris G.
    I was fascinated by your thoughts about maps. I wonder, did you start writing your first novel and realize that you needed a map to better get the movements in your world or did you make a map to keep everything straight after you started writing?

    My problem with maps, I can't draw, but I found I could not go beyond chapter three without it.
    Actually, I make the map before I start writing. I will ponder a story for weeks or months before the first line is written. I find that I need definition on two things before I start writing. First I need a map. I must know what my world looks like. The map can be crude, but I must have a visual impression of where the action will take place. That map will almost certainly change over the course of the story, but the changes will only be in the details.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris G.
    What do you both recomend, that I try to find a publisher or that I try to find an agent?
    I would start with an agent as most publishers will not accept unagented submissions, but I also would not rely on MY advice on this topic. It is an important question, and I think you should ask some of the other authors on this site.

  7. #22
    Books of Pellinor alison's Avatar
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    Interestingly, I have spent no time trying to understand the process, but this discussion with you may change that. I am very organized with my writing, probably due to my background in creating computer systems, but I have never tried to analyze why I write the way I do. Perhaps some reflection on that is in order.
    Richard, I seriously doubt whether there is any should about all that. Only if it's fun and interesting. I suspect that I tend to think about all this stuff because the fact that I have such a strong desire to write basically baffles me. After three decades of wondering about it, I still really don't know why I do. But what matters is the fact that I do, not the why!

    As for maps - Chris, I got about ten pages into my first book and realised I needed a map and a timeline, so I knew where I was. And a note book for the language I was making up and for various names, so I wouldn't spell them wrong or forget them. And then I needed to connect the dots a bit. I like making maps - I used to do it as a child - so while I'm no cartographer, I enjoyed getting out the coloured pens and making the drawings. So for me, all these things grew organically out of the narrative. After Book 1, the geography is more or less there, I can't move mountains even though in this world I am God.

    And I think you would need to get an agent, Chris (though I didn't get an agent until I had a publisher - but I was already published as a writer in another field, which helped me). This can be as difficult as getting a publisher; but it helps, and an agent will you on how best to present your work as well. Publishers get something like 3000 unsolicited ms a year, so it can be a tough road.

  8. #23
    Registered User tuttle's Avatar
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    Hi Alison,

    Quote Originally Posted by alison
    the fact that I have such a strong desire to write basically baffles me. After three decades of wondering about it, I still really don't know why I do.
    I misunderstood your earlier statement. Let me clarify.

    I haven't thought much about the way I write, but I fully understand why I write. I write because it is a creative outlet, and I love the feeling that develops when a creation comes to fruition. I have had other professions that bring the same joy, and the feelings of completion are quite similar.

    In creating complex manufacturing computer systems, there is a similar feeling of creation, but there is also a constraint on your imagination. The systems must adhere to certain guidelines and satisfy predetermined requirements. In writing fantasy, none of those apply. One is free to let the imagination run wild, but it the strong desire to once again obtain that wonderful feeling of creation that drives my writing urge.

    When I am between books, I find myself longing to begin the next. Even taking time to savor the latest release becomes unbearable.

    Must finish this post<twitch>...new book idea is calling me!

  9. #24
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    soz my bad
    Last edited by Tari; February 25th, 2005 at 07:57 AM.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuttle
    I am curious if other authors write in a similar fashion. Do you assume the characters in your books? Do you toss away reality and actually become the character when you write? Or do you view it more from the sense of a movie director where you watch from afar and manipulate the pieces on the board?
    Hi Richard,

    in answer to your question it depends on who my characters are. there are some characters i find easier to step into. i'm in yr11 and am doing the Drama Studies course and this helps me alot with my writing. but when i write i usually have a main idea, like the climax and a character or two to become involved and let my characters write out their own adventures for me. but like i said it depends on how im writing and who im writing (if that makes sense). i tend to become my character rather than view them from the outside and manipulate them.

    In DS (Drama Studies) we've just finished a course of Verbal and Non'Verbal communication and our assignments was to analyse a photo of a family made up of five siblings. their mother was a drug addict and she died and we had to meet up at her funeral. most of these people hadn't seen or heard from each other for over ten years. it's difficult but we focused on their interaction but mainly on character building. to get good marks in this course you have to become your character and the world he/she/it are in and it isn't easy.

    we study how to get to know our characters, meet them and explore them then become them and this affects how i write my characters. because i'm an actor (they cannot be called actresses any more which if u ask me stinks ) i find it easier to step into a character and perform it out rather than be a director. i wrote our school production last year for our class and as i wrote i'd spend hours walking and talking with my friend in character, trying to see how they interact on the stage and same goes for my books. if im in strife or my characters have come to a halt in the middle of the story i get up and act out the characters in the same situation. i lock the door and turns up theme music and go for it. i know i look stupid but it works for me.

    ~Tari

  11. #26
    Registered User tuttle's Avatar
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    Hi Tari,

    Elven Princess - I like that!


    Quote Originally Posted by Tari
    i find it easier to step into a character and perform it out rather than be a director.
    Interesting. For some reason I had not equated acting with writing, but it makes sense the way you describe it. If someone had asked me to play a part in a play, I would have walked away knowing that I am not suited to such a diversion, yet that is much the way I write. Of course there is still a tremendous difference in mentally creating a character and physically portraying one, but it does cause one to think about the similarities.

    Question: Why is it no longer acceptable to call one an actress? Is this now on our list of deragatory terms?

  12. #27
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    Hi Richard

    Tari is my name in Elvish . . . . it also means queen but princess sounds better, i think. excuse any typos performed buy me my hands dont seem to want to obey me today.

    I'm actualy not surprised that you hadn't equated writing with acting before. most people haven't simply because they haven't studied drama or acting as thoroughly as i've been priveledged to. i've been in the master performance class at my school for two years now and am loving it.

    Of course there is still a tremendous difference in mentally creating a character and physically portraying one, but it does cause one to think about the similarities.[
    Like i said i've had experience with having to portray written characters as well as making them up as i go along with both writing and acting. some are harder to do then others but i've found it easier to portray someone i wrote simply because i know them so well. most people wouldn't have the courage to get up and act out a character unless you've had the experience before. yes physically portraying a character is different compared to mentally creating one yet they are the same in so many ways if you think about it.

    To answer your question i'm not entirely sure why they dont call them actresses anymore. i know it has nearly been completely fazed out in live theatre but i think movies have kept it as actress (i prefer live theatre, it's so much more skillful and intense, especially if your on the stage it's absolutely terrifying! ) i know all actors/actresses are alo called Fesbians in some places. which we get called all the time by our director.

    ~Tari
    Last edited by Tari; February 26th, 2005 at 11:41 PM.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuttle
    Question: Why is it no longer acceptable to call one an actress? Is this now on our list of deragatory terms?
    I'm 15 (nearly 16 . . . .he he he . . . .me on the road!!! Run Hide!) sorry. what does deragatory mean?

  14. #29
    Registered User tuttle's Avatar
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    Hi Tari,

    Quote Originally Posted by Tari
    I'm 15 (nearly 16 . . . .he he he . . . .me on the road!!! Run Hide!) sorry. what does deragatory mean?
    It means disrespectful or disparaging.
    15? Wow, it sounds like you are getting some great training!
    As for typing mistakes or typos, I think we all tend to overlook them on a forum. Or at least I hope we do LOL.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuttle
    As for typing mistakes or typos, I think we all tend to overlook them on a forum. Or at least I hope we do LOL.
    Actually i am geting really good training. and once again my hands are not obeying me . . . . .much. so i hope most people overlook my typo's as long as pepople can understand what i'm saying it shouldn't matter. Gilraen say's hi. my friend is sitting next to me right now laughing at me . . . . yet again *hangs head in shame*

    Okay then yes you can no longer call a female actor an actress because they believe it's sexist by classifying them seperately. so yes it's derogatory. (Gil reminded me again of this answer. so i thank her again.)

    i gtg i'm @ school and class just ended.

    ciao
    ~ Tari

    P.S. I love u're pic. care to elaborate for me plz?
    Last edited by Tari; March 2nd, 2005 at 05:15 AM.

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