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  1. #1

    In Need of Encouragement

    I need some help. I'm trying to read The Witches of Eileanan by Kate Forsyth, and I need someone to give me a reason to keep reading. I'm about 125 pages into the second book, and something just isn't working. They aren't bad books. The basic premise of the story is pretty good. The characters, while not terribly original, aren't cookie-cutter types. The back-story seems well done. The magic, while pervasive, isn't overly powerful and is, to this point, well thought out. The problem is, I just don't care; not about the story and not about the characters. There's just no emotion in Forsyth's writing. Sure, she tell the reader how the characters feel, but she isn't able to make me feel it.

    It's sad, because I think the story has potential. I mean, I want to like these books. I want to care what happens. Forsyth hasn't yet done anything that makes me want to put the books down, but neither has she done much to make me want to pick them up.

    So I guess I'm looking for anyone who has read this series and had a similar experience. Someone who can tell me that it's worth it to continue reading. If not that, then I'd settle for someone telling me that the books don't get better, so I can put them down and move on to something else.

  2. #2
    Would be writer? Sure. Davis Ashura's Avatar
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    Join the club. I tried reading the first book myself long ago, but I couldn't get into it. One thing that just bothered the heck out of me was the brogue that everyone spoke it. It was irritating enough to eventually distract me, and I ended up not being able to relate to the characters.

  3. #3

    you wimps

    iv read all kate's books , theres a reason the first one was slow, it gets so much better in the third and forth.....it goes from politics to awsome-ness if you quit now then you wont be able to start again so pick up that book and get with the program . it only gets better and i hear there talking about making the first book a movie



    READ you imagination counts on it




    thank you for taking my advice

    ill be watching O_O

  4. #4
    Wow. That's exactly how I'm feeling about Raymond E. Feist's Magician. I'm about halfway through Magician: Master now and it's only a determination to finish everything I start now that has kept me from putting it down.

    It's not bad. There's a lot that's good. I'm just having a hard time caring.

  5. #5

    All downhill after Magician...

    Honestly, Magician (Apprentice and Master) is the best Feist I have read...I found it more intense and believable than the later works, and more chock full of the unique feel of Midkemia. In later books, dark elves seem just to pop up as a plot device, and you get a sense that if one character stops being important or dies, another will just roll along and pick up the sword...Also, Pug becomes too powerful, and thus is less used, sort of like an RPG character who reaches such a high level that the referee has to refuse to let the player use him...If you are having trouble staying in now, Silverthorn will finish you...but Darkness at Sethanon picks up a bit and adds a lot of new stuff.
    One gets the idea with Feist that there is no underlying primary set of values or rationale for the heroes...no "Good" with a capital G...which would be fine if the ambiguities of good and evil were the focus instead, but that doesn't seem to be the case either. It's just a world that rolls on and on...maybe for some that's a good thing. It's certainly closer to our world, in which no battle is ever final, and no war ever gets us closer to the world we want...but I read fantasy to escape from that!
    I do enjoy Feist in spite of my criticisms, and would welcome any counterpoint to my words.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Osiris View Post
    Honestly, Magician (Apprentice and Master) is the best Feist I have read...I found it more intense and believable than the later works, and more chock full of the unique feel of Midkemia. In later books, dark elves seem just to pop up as a plot device, and you get a sense that if one character stops being important or dies, another will just roll along and pick up the sword...Also, Pug becomes too powerful, and thus is less used, sort of like an RPG character who reaches such a high level that the referee has to refuse to let the player use him...If you are having trouble staying in now, Silverthorn will finish you...but Darkness at Sethanon picks up a bit and adds a lot of new stuff.
    One gets the idea with Feist that there is no underlying primary set of values or rationale for the heroes...no "Good" with a capital G...which would be fine if the ambiguities of good and evil were the focus instead, but that doesn't seem to be the case either. It's just a world that rolls on and on...maybe for some that's a good thing. It's certainly closer to our world, in which no battle is ever final, and no war ever gets us closer to the world we want...but I read fantasy to escape from that!
    I do enjoy Feist in spite of my criticisms, and would welcome any counterpoint to my words.
    You want a counterpoint, how about this one. I loved Silverthorn. It reinvigorated my interest in the series and I am now enjoying Sethanon.

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