Writing a prequel by Jim Bernheimer

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When I decided to write a prequel to Confessions of a D-List Supervillain to add more substance to the universe before advancing the storyline, I underestimated the amount of reluctance that goes along with prequels in general. Curse you George Lucas! You’ve tainted the concept of prequels forever. I guess it’s not all his fault (just mostly). From a reader’s perspective, they know how the story...

Article: Empires: Extraction and Empires: Infiltration

Empires extraction
On the recent release of Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction, both authors involved (Stephen and Gavin) wrote about their reaction to each other’s work, and the joys and perils of working collaboratively. CAUTION: Some of this may be NSFW. Here’s the second part of this article – Gavin’s reaction to Empires: Extraction:   Empires: Extraction – A Reaction Or what...

Article: Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction

Empires Infiltration
On the recent release of Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction, both authors involved (Stephen and Gavin) wrote about their reaction to each other’s work, and the joys and perils of working collaboratively. CAUTION: Some of this may be NSFW. Here’s the first part of this article – Stephen’s reaction to Empires: Infiltration: Empires: Infiltration  – A Reaction For...

Why Adults Need to Read Young Adult and Children’s Books by Jeyn Roberts

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I always find it odd when people tell me they won’t read young adult novels. When I will ask them why, I get a numerous amount of different excuses. — They’re dumbed down. — They aren’t mature enough. — They deal with subjects only kids care about. — They’re not literary enough. — I only read books that I can discuss with my peers. I’d be embarrassed to admit I read YA. I could...

The Quirks of Playing in Two Sandboxes: Erin Lindsey on Pseudonyms [GUEST POST]

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I remember very distinctly the first couple of times I mentioned to another author that I had just sold a second series to Ace/Roc. There were looks. Not looks of envy – oh no. It was more of a have-you-gone-completely-barkers thing. Which, it turns out, was not an unreasonable question. The thing is, I have a full-time day job. A busy one, which requires a lot of “overtime” and international...

Dystopia vs. Utopia by Gavin Smith (Guest Post)

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As Gavin has his latest SF novel, The Age of Scorpio, released in paperback, he provides us with a Guest Post that looks at the ever-present argument in SF:  Dystopia vs. Utopia? So somewhat irritatingly editors expect you to pitch for publishing deals rather than just respecting your obvious (sub)genius and giving you money to go away and write stuff. A little while ago I was doing such a pitch and...

Rules and Ornaments in Secondary World Fantasy by Robert Jackson Bennett [Guest Post]

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When I sat down to write City of Stairs – my first secondary world novel – I realized I felt I’d written secondary worlds before. My first novel, Mr. Shivers, ostensibly takes place in our own world, as the characters pursue a murderer across the Dustbowl at the height of the Great Depression. There were obviously some parameters to the story that were set in stone: I could not, say, stick...

There is No Genre, Only Story by Kameron Hurley (MIRROR EMPIRE Blog Tour)

Cover art by Richard Anderson
So Robert J. Bennett wrote a post recently about the expectations we bring to stories based on what genre they are marketed as. Far beyond the old “magic and dragons” vs. “science and spaceships” debate, Bennett posits that genre categories have become so narrow that saying something is “epic fantasy” doesn’t just imply magic and mythical creatures, but gives readers expectations that...

Climate Fiction by Claude Nougat

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Climate Fiction: A Brand New Genre Promised to a Big Future Cli-fi has achieved a record of sorts: even though it has been around only since 2008, when the term was first coined by climate activist Dan Bloom, it has already become the subject of academic research. At the University of Copenhagen, a PhD student, Gregers Andersen, has explored global warming in fiction and philosophy in a widely-publicized...

What Makes Urban Fantasy by Gail Z. Martin

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If you want to get down to bare bones, what defines “urban fantasy” is the setting. By definition, it’s….urban. Often set in a big city, sometimes in a small town, the story also takes place here and now, as opposed to a long time ago and far away. But beyond that, how binding are the tropes? What leeway do authors have to stretch the boundaries of the subgenre? And are tattoos...
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